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Rumour: New socket to replace LGA1366 due in 2011

Rumour: New socket to replace LGA1366 due in 2011

Intel's next generation platform to replace LGA1366 will arrive late next year, so an upgrade to the Core i7-930 is still a good investment.

Here’s a quick bit of overheard info for you – Intel’s replacement for its current high-end Core i7 CPU range will arrive in Q3 2011, so if you’re planning an LGA1366 upgrade now (perhaps with a Core-i7 930) then it’s still got plenty of life left in it.

The bad news is, there will be no compatibility between current LGA1366 Core i7s and the new socket. Intel is planning on launching a new socket for every new major CPU revision as it’s continuing to incorporate more and more features into future CPUs, which means pin-counts and sockets will inevitably change.

Our sources in Taiwan also told us that the new chipset that will accompany this socket - inevitably being called "X68", although this is far from being an official name - will feature four DDR3 DIMM channels. It will only support one DIMM per channel as this maximises memory bandwidth, but memory density will be overall lower than current LGA1366, Core i7 systems as there will only be four sockets versus the six you see on current X58 boards. The chipset will include more PCI-E lanes of some description, either 2.0 or 3.0.

No details on the socket pin-count or size are available yet, however we do know the first CPUs will be a native eight-core, 16-thread design (as seen in the just launched Xeon X7650), based on the upcoming Sandy Bridge architecture.

The good news is for those who upgraded to LGA1366 in late 2008 or even last year have had a fantastic investment of their money as we expect their systems will continue to be the fastest products available until the replacement late next year. Interested in saving up for a new 8-core behemoth? Does this change your upgrade cycle? Let us know your thoughts, in the forum.

47 Comments

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GFC 12th April 2010, 10:36 Quote
Bad news for me. I was kind of expecting to get a double digit-core cpu in my x58 rig.. :/
Tulatin 12th April 2010, 10:37 Quote
Well, three years isn't a terrible lifespan for a socket, I suppose. Mind you, it's in Intel's habit to swap sockets/standards with each major chipset release.

That said, these boards are going to be horribly expensive. Just the thought of wiring up four discrete channels passing through a northbridge.
rickysio 12th April 2010, 10:41 Quote
Will be saving up for now, and upgrade my LGA775 rig!
stonedsurd 12th April 2010, 10:44 Quote
Oh god, ANOTHER one?
ramliz 12th April 2010, 10:47 Quote
As much as I love computers, I am not rich and a pc is still just a pc I tend to buy a monster every 4-5 years take every little bit of pleasure from the build I still have my lovely Q6600 works good for me, the next socket could be a temptation but this just out confirmed i7 is not for me.
Cerberus90 12th April 2010, 10:50 Quote
Intel have turned it AMD from the past.

And AMD have turned into Intel from the past. :D

AMD had socket A, 75, 939
Intel had 775 for ages (and 478).

AMD ruled performance with the Athlon.
Intel struggled with the P4.

AMD has had AM2 and AM3.
Intel 775, 1366,1156,and now another one

Intel ruling performance with Core i and c2d range
AMD struggling.

:D
BlackMage23 12th April 2010, 10:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulatin
Well, three years isn't a terrible lifespan for a socket, I suppose. Mind you, it's in Intel's habit to swap sockets/standards with each major chipset release.

That said, these boards are going to be horribly expensive. Just the thought of wiring up four discrete channels passing through a northbridge.

How long has 775 been around for?

I'm still using a E6600 on a P45 board, and see no reason to upgrade my CPU at the moment.
My next upgrade will probably be for a DX11 graphics card.
If I feel that I need more CPU power I'll just switch to a Q6600 or Q9300 as lots of people are selling those as they upgrade.
dyzophoria 12th April 2010, 11:09 Quote
if changes to the new architecture is that much or there will be a bunch of new stuff to introduce a new pinout is understable, but introduce a new socket with almost the same specs that's different
Farting Bob 12th April 2010, 11:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulatin

Just the thought of wiring up four discrete channels passing through a northbridge.
Northbridges? How quaint!

They seem to be pushing the X58 and this successor into enterprise territory more and more. Its clear that 1156 will last at least a while, anything else and your asking to pay a early adopters fee with no guarantee that your next upgrade will be compatible.
Autti 12th April 2010, 11:48 Quote
Eh, i dont really mind this.
Pin count is a hardware limitation, and we all know there is only one way to remove that limitation.

Intel must be envisaging that 4gb dimms will be abundant and cheap(ish) in 2011, because servers always want more memory, and limiting it to 4 slots seems crazy. Go try and tell an enterprise server they can only use 3 memory slots per CPU and they would laugh at you and buy something else.
BlackMage23 12th April 2010, 12:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Autti
Eh, i dont really mind this.
Pin count is a hardware limitation, and we all know there is only one way to remove that limitation.

Intel must be envisaging that 4gb dimms will be abundant and cheap(ish) in 2011, because servers always want more memory, and limiting it to 4 slots seems crazy. Go try and tell an enterprise server they can only use 3 memory slots per CPU and they would laugh at you and buy something else.

Don't forget that they are talking about the desktop part, not a Xeon.

This will make its way into workstations, but servers will be for the Xeon part.

and don't forget that the 4 slots will probably be able to take 32GB of memory (assuming 8GB modules start to show up then).
wuyanxu 12th April 2010, 13:00 Quote
well, that's expected, Intel have already moved to 4-channel memory in their 8-core server chip. and when you buy the best, expect to be outdated faster than mainstream folks.

socket LGA1576 next year?
kingozzy666 12th April 2010, 13:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuyanxu
well, that's expected, Intel have already moved to 4-channel memory in their 8-core server chip. and when you buy the best, expect to be outdated faster than mainstream folks.

socket LGA1576 next year?

Oooh I never noticed that pattern. Would be funny if you're right.
wuyanxu 12th April 2010, 13:14 Quote
outdated as in not the best in town, it will still be very fast, but you will have to spend more to have similar performance as mainstream. (think i7 860 LGA1156 platform vs i7 930 LGA1366 platform, similar performance, one's the best the other is mainstream)
V3ctor 12th April 2010, 13:33 Quote
2011... nice year to retire my Q6600 rig... I was waiting on sandybridge or bulldozer/lano from AMD... But I'll wait until 2011, it's not that my cpu is terribly slow now, maybe it comes at the same time as Windows 8 :)
javaman 12th April 2010, 13:48 Quote
I can see AMD releasing another socket when they integrate their graphics into the CPU. TBH is their any point of integrating graphics into the CPU at this stage. They're no better than what they're replacing and they just added extra heat which will reduce overclocking.
Redbeaver 12th April 2010, 14:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by V3ctor
2011... nice year to retire my Q6600 rig... I was waiting on sandybridge or bulldozer/lano from AMD... But I'll wait until 2011, it's not that my cpu is terribly slow now, maybe it comes at the same time as Windows 8 :)

same boat with u :) Q6600 on 775 is still good for now.

2011 its a new socket.

and maybe next year ill grab a cheap Fermi470 to keep it running for another year.
frontline 12th April 2010, 14:35 Quote
It wIll be 2011 before i even consider another major upgrade. An i7 system would be nice, but i really can't see the justification for an upgrade at the minute, as my existing system is more than capable of doing everything i need it to do.
l3v1ck 12th April 2010, 15:07 Quote
Well LGA1366 didn't last long then did it? Or maybe we've all been spoiled with LGA775. That would put me off buying an LGA1366 CPU/motherboard now.
Ross1 12th April 2010, 15:21 Quote
This is basically the reason i didnt want to go for 1366. Its pretty much had 1 reasonably priced CPU during its life (920, replaced by 930). It may get a non EE six core chip in late 2010, and thats it.
Djayness 12th April 2010, 15:43 Quote
Wow, I'm still on my x48 maximus SE lol :p

Guess i'll just skip x58 and wait till 2011 for the new socket, games are pretty much GPU limited anyhow and 4ghz on the q6600 isnt going to slow much down anytime soon.

Waiting till crysis 2 before I spend any dosh though...
xaser04 12th April 2010, 16:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by stonedsurd
Oh god, ANOTHER one?

Not really as this will be the X58 LGA1366 replacement. X58 will be EOL by this point (as no doubt will the i7 in its current form).
ZERO <ibis> 12th April 2010, 16:54 Quote
If this drives down the 1366 extremes in a few years this will be nice because I can then upgrade my 965 to a 975 or better without losing another G lol.
PingCrosby 12th April 2010, 17:08 Quote
Bloody ell...havent even managed to save up for an i7 core yet.
dark_avenger 13th April 2010, 00:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulatin
Well, three years isn't a terrible lifespan for a socket, I suppose. Mind you, it's in Intel's habit to swap sockets/standards with each major chipset release.

That said, these boards are going to be horribly expensive. Just the thought of wiring up four discrete channels passing through a northbridge.

On an i3/15/i7 the memory is directly connected to the CPU
ZERO <ibis> 13th April 2010, 05:09 Quote
Yea but who knows what the memory will be connected to on the new boards! That is what is so scary!
gavomatic57 13th April 2010, 08:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Djayness


Waiting till crysis 2 before I spend any dosh though...

I wouldn't bother waiting for that. If it can run on a 360 it can run on anything.

My question is, what becomes of i5 in all of this?
phuzz 13th April 2010, 10:07 Quote
Hmm, I'm still on 775 (not alone by the looks of it), so I'm looking forward to upgrading my cpu/mobo and memory all at the same time. Who knows, maybe AMD will retake the high ground next year, then I could continue my unbroken stretch of alternating manufacturers each upgrade.

(and thanks to BlackMage for pointing out the cheapness of quad cores on ebay, I think I'll have a little incremental upgrade sometime this year)
ddg4005 13th April 2010, 10:45 Quote
I'm still running Socket 775 boards and CPUs in both my boxes. I wasn't planning on upgrading either of them until SATA 6G, USB3.0, and PCIe 3.0 are natively supported in an Intel chipset. Maybe by 2012 that'll happen.
ab2c4 13th April 2010, 18:33 Quote
This is all good news to me. I am currently running a q9550 and I can't justify right now paying the cost to upgrade to an i7 quad core setup. Two years from now I would be in an excellent position to upgrade to an 8-core (I would have gotten all I could get out of the q9550 by then for gaming). Or, depending on how much the cpu/mobo/ram would cost, possibly a higher clocked 6-core if the price difference was large enough.

Regardless of upgrading to a 6 or 8 core setup, it would be a huge upgrade over my socket 775 system I am currently running and worth the money to do so at that point.
Sloth 13th April 2010, 20:10 Quote
I already decided that I wouldn't buy a whole new system until 6+ cores was the norm, sounding like the new socket will be the time for that. Though who knows if this E6750 will follow me all of the way there...
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZERO <ibis>
Yea but who knows what the memory will be connected to on the new boards! That is what is so scary!
Probably the CPU again. No real reason to go back on that change.
MSHunter 14th April 2010, 03:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by PingCrosby
Bloody ell...havent even managed to save up for an i7 core yet.

I was just thinking the same thing :D
ccxo 14th April 2010, 04:16 Quote
Makes you wonder if leaving i7 alone and just get a cheap i5 setup.
Bindibadgi 14th April 2010, 05:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccxo
Makes you wonder if leaving i7 alone and just get a cheap i5 setup.

To be honest, i7 isn't exactly going to become slow overnight ;)
Initialised 19th April 2010, 22:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sloth
I already decided that I wouldn't buy a whole new system until 6+ cores was the norm...
April 27th, Thuban aka Phenom II x6 1055T and 1090T launch, if I was buying around now I'd be looking at AM2/3 rather than 1156.
Splynncryth 20th April 2010, 19:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Autti
Eh, i dont really mind this.
Pin count is a hardware limitation, and we all know there is only one way to remove that limitation.

Intel must be envisaging that 4gb dimms will be abundant and cheap(ish) in 2011, because servers always want more memory, and limiting it to 4 slots seems crazy. Go try and tell an enterprise server they can only use 3 memory slots per CPU and they would laugh at you and buy something else.

Memory slots is a big selling point for the new blade Cisco is selling (and the rest of the hardware to go with it). It can support 48 DIMMs (with some limitations).

But the article says it 4 channels, not 4 DIMMs per CPU. If the CPU can support a 3 DIMM per channel configuration like some of the Xeon stuff now does, then you have 12 DIMMs per CPU for a total of 24 DIMMs which is quite good.

As for the socket, I had personally hoped QPI would help here and let at least some of the stuff they are building onto the CPU sit close to it but allow for a common interconnect. But I hoped FB-DIMMs would have matured to allow for a common memory interface as well, and that was pure wishful thinking.
Coltch 23rd April 2010, 15:43 Quote
Was looking towards an i7 set-up in the next couple of months as my current skt939 system is starting to show its age (still handles everything I throw at it though).

Another socket type doesn't bother me as the current i7 on 1366 will blow away my current AMD rig, as that is about 4-5 years old and went EOL ages ago I think the i7 would probably last me the same amount of time regardless of whether it was EOL or not.
borandi 24th April 2010, 20:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splynncryth

But the article says it 4 channels, not 4 DIMMs per CPU. If the CPU can support a 3 DIMM per channel configuration like some of the Xeon stuff now does, then you have 12 DIMMs per CPU for a total of 24 DIMMs which is quite good.
Quote:
Originally Posted by article

Our sources in Taiwan also told us that the new chipset that will accompany this socket - inevitably being called "X68", although this is far from being an official name - will feature four DDR3 DIMM channels. It will only support one DIMM per channel as this maximises memory bandwidth

The ex58-ud3r, the old budget x58 board, has only 4 DIMM slots to save space and money. As previously stated, Intel are banking on 4GB sticks being more main stream. But even still, unless you're doing something other than the norm (VMs, or as I do, scientific simulation), 4x2GB on your system will be plenty.
Bindibadgi 25th April 2010, 05:12 Quote
May I highlight that at this point nothing is confirmed by Intel itself.

It could well be that Xeons support more than 1 DIMM per channel, but I would expect that Xeons will have LR-DIMM support for greater DIMM counts.
flibblesan 25th April 2010, 06:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerberus90
Intel have turned it AMD from the past.

And AMD have turned into Intel from the past. :D

AMD had socket A, 75, 939
Intel had 775 for ages (and 478).

AMD ruled performance with the Athlon.
Intel struggled with the P4.

AMD has had AM2 and AM3.
Intel 775, 1366,1156,and now another one

Intel ruling performance with Core i and c2d range
AMD struggling.

:D

And the upcoming Phenom II X6 CPUs are AM3. I wouldn't say AMD are struggling by any means. Intel certainly beats them with higher-end CPUs, but AMD is doing well with the lower to mid-range market. The upcoming X6 will only help AMD gain more of this market.

Sorry for being off-topic.
wuyanxu 25th April 2010, 10:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindibadgi
May I highlight that at this point nothing is confirmed by Intel itself.

It could well be that Xeons support more than 1 DIMM per channel, but I would expect that Xeons will have LR-DIMM support for greater DIMM counts.
however, the Sandy-bridge LGA1155 is confirmed?
mars-bar-man 26th April 2010, 13:39 Quote
I'm not planning on upgrading until I finish Uni, and I haven't actually started yet. So in 3 and a bit years I'll begin to think about a total overhaul, may upgrade the GPU eventually, but for now, it runs everything fine.
kingjohn 3rd August 2010, 00:39 Quote
i hope no one is complaining cause i must have the slowest 1066 mbrd and probably the oldest , probably even older than the original 1066 norman conquest when the saxons had thier asses kicked .
japhid 24th August 2010, 04:14 Quote
Been waiting for 4 channel / 8 core for the last three years. My next build will be based on it and has been on the drawing board for that long. Just had to wait for released technology to catch up.

I first heard about 4 channel about four years ago and it wasn't brand new then. I reckon all developments are drip-fed to us about five years late so the manufacturers can maximise profits. I bet there is already technology, in the labs, ready for production, at least a hundred times faster than what has already been released.
delorean1981 8th September 2010, 15:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by V3ctor
2011... nice year to retire my Q6600 rig... I was waiting on sandybridge or bulldozer/lano from AMD... But I'll wait until 2011, it's not that my cpu is terribly slow now, maybe it comes at the same time as Windows 8 :)

Yeah I hear ya, nice time to retire my 775 P4, shudder, I know. Between this and the hopeful Light Peak tech, I can't wait.
ninox999 2nd January 2011, 12:36 Quote
you see? this is why i went to am3. amd's range can do the same stuff intel's do. cheaper and same speeds! all intel is doing is charging you an extra $500 AUD for a bit more speed and a new socket that seems even more pointless than the last one to the 775 or 1156 fans who are still worthy to their pc. intel should be getting feedback and opinions from fans and be doing upgrades on what the FANS WANT instead of going with the future. there is still people out there that have even older sockets and are still happy with them!
Amorris 9th February 2011, 11:14 Quote
Once the Q6600 hit, I upgraded and purchased the G0 stepping version. Mainly due to recommendations from sites such as Bit-Tech – what a fantastic CPU and for the length of time I had it. Was incredibly good value for money.

Early 2009 I moved onto the i7 920 D0 – once again, due to recommendations made by places like Bit-Tech.

Can’t help but feel I've struck gold twice in a row, purchasing at the right time and getting almost 3 years out of the 1366 platform before 2011 comes along. Oddly, whenever I purchased, RAM has always been at its lowest price also.

I'll be watching places like Bit-Tech carefully when the 2011 comes along, purchasing based on their recommendations as always.

I never want bleeding edge computing, I can't help but feel the benefits of buying such fast components never justify the price tag. Not unless you really need it (Video encoding all day long etc), which 99% of people don't...

From what I've seen over my last two upgrades, there is always that “sweet spot” CPU.. One that offers incredibly good performance, with a very competitive price tag. Which will last you to the next generation with ease, with plenty of room to overclock if required.
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