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Kingston previews liquid-cooled RAM

Kingston previews liquid-cooled RAM

The new Kingston HyperX RAM features a liquid-cooling heatspreader for immediate connection to your system's loop.

Memory manufacturer Kingston have sneaked out some pics of new RAM chips designed for water-cooled systems just in time to make everyone's wish list for 2010.

As revealed over on Softpedia, the new DDR3 memory - released under the company's HyperX brand - features barbs for connecting to a liquid cooling loop along the top of the heatspreader.

Designed for hardcore overclockers - or those with such a cramped case that airflow is at a premium and high-speed RAM just won't cool down - the memory modules are currently in testing at the company's labs, with an announcement due at CES 2010 next month.

Sadly, prior to that announcement, all we have are a couple of pictures - so far the company hasn't released any specifications for the RAM hidden underneath the new heatspreaders. While we'll have to wait for pricing information and speed details, it's clear that Kingston is hoping to capture the hearts of the overclocking community with an easy way to add RAM into a watercooling loop.

While the liquid cooling system built into the heatspreader will certain get some interest, the real proof will be in the overclocking potential of the RAM hidden underneath: with Corsair already setting world records with standard air-cooled Dominator DDR3, Kingston will have to ensure that the hardware matches the cooling system and overs overclockers the performance they crave.

Does the idea of adding your RAM into your watercooling loop fill you with joy, or are you going to need to see some specs and pricing information before you get too excited? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

22 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
yakyb 24th December 2009, 10:12 Quote
ummm havnt OCZ been doing this for years
DragunovHUN 24th December 2009, 10:43 Quote
Eh, barbs. They don't look replaceable either. I guess compression fittings wouldn't really fit on there.
Horizon 24th December 2009, 10:47 Quote
Pretty much why I have always like Corsair's and Muskin's solutions better.
biebiep 24th December 2009, 10:57 Quote
I'll pass on the RustBowl of aluminium :)
H2O 24th December 2009, 16:03 Quote
Corsair Dominators + MIPS RAM block is the way to go. What if you have a DOA stick and don't know it until you plumb and fill the system? That would make for one long afternoon.
D-Cyph3r 24th December 2009, 16:05 Quote
Right up there with watercooling your HDD's in terms of pointlessness...
HourBeforeDawn 24th December 2009, 17:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by biebiep
I'll pass on the RustBowl of aluminium :)

you do know aluminum doesnt actually rust.
Cupboard 24th December 2009, 18:00 Quote
having aluminium in a loop could potentially make other things corrode more though.

I think... :D

being as in the past people have commented on how pointless water cooled RAM is, they do seem a bit useless to me.
TSR2 24th December 2009, 18:32 Quote
Yes, the article says they are for either 'hardcore overclockers' in which case the user would be expected to have a nice chilly case, or 'those with cramped cases' who wouldn't really be likely to be using performance RAM anyway. They seem more for the shiny factor than anything else.
sear 24th December 2009, 19:15 Quote
What's the point? It has geek appeal but the 1.65v modules run cool enough even when overclocked.
HourBeforeDawn 24th December 2009, 19:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupboard
having aluminium in a loop could potentially make other things corrode more though.

I think... :D

being as in the past people have commented on how pointless water cooled RAM is, they do seem a bit useless to me.

run anti corrosion stuff
RichCreedy 24th December 2009, 23:39 Quote
aluminium does rust but only on the surface, which then protects the underlying metal

any cooling system with mixed metals has the potential for increased corrosion, due to the interaction of the metal salts reacting with the other metals.
Autti 25th December 2009, 03:15 Quote
aka redox reactions.
Jipa 25th December 2009, 22:08 Quote
How many world record setups have you seen with water cooling on the ram? How many kits of water cooled ram have you seen on flashy project logs with barely any overclocking included? Pointless.
s3v3n 28th December 2009, 17:45 Quote
In the past (ddr and before) I always built PCs with basic ram because I was in school and didn't have the money to buy super fancy ram. When I got a job and built a system with ddr2, I bought the top of the line stuff. That was the last time I bought top of the line ram... I've had 5 pairs die withing a year of use, some within months, while running 0.1-0.2v under the rating. These are ram from Corsair, Cruicial, and OCZ. Top of the line names. It just seems the extra 1% in speed causes the ram to fail 10x as fast.
Are all "Enthusiast" ram like that? Because I have generic DDR ram that's been running in my Athlon for over 6 years.
But I'll give them credit, those companies RMA without a hassle.
PandaMonster 28th December 2009, 18:11 Quote
Water cooled is like saying you drive a fast car when you are driving a Honda Civic.

You think you are a bad ass for having it (you're not) and that air is weak (it's better, actually). You know, no hassle, and only a minimal gain from going to water-cooling. The top air-cooler (probably a noctua) out-does many water-cooling setups. I know this is not the best one (Corsair H50 Cooler) but the Noctua performs better.

Water-cooled ram is like having a boosted Civic (you're still slow) and have to put up with the hassle of tuning your turbo and not breaking your engine all the time. In this case, hoping you have no leaks any where.

Verdict:

Stick with air especially on RAM.
Xtrafresh 29th December 2009, 20:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by PandaMonster
Water cooled is like saying you drive a fast car when you are driving a Honda Civic.

You think you are a bad ass for having it (you're not) and that air is weak (it's better, actually). You know, no hassle, and only a minimal gain from going to water-cooling. The top air-cooler (probably a noctua) out-does many water-cooling setups. I know this is not the best one (Corsair H50 Cooler) but the Noctua performs better.

Water-cooled ram is like having a boosted Civic (you're still slow) and have to put up with the hassle of tuning your turbo and not breaking your engine all the time. In this case, hoping you have no leaks any where.

Verdict:

Stick with air especially on RAM.
flamebait alert!

Please get off the high horse. I have a nice watercooling setup, and i know full well i overpaid, and i'm still happy with it. It looks better, it runs cooler, it makes less noise, and it makes the geek in me all fuzzy inside. I can admit i have it for the bling and the want-factor, and i am chuffed to bits with it. Argueing that i dont need it will get you on the arguement that nobody really needs anything more then a q6600 and a gtx8800, and that everyone who upgraded after that is a fool. I have news for you, you are on the wrong website for that message

Ofcourse the RAM is pointless and OTT. The real thing that Kinston is getting wrong here is that it still looks bad and has no interchangable barbs.
knuck 29th December 2009, 21:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtrafresh
flamebait alert!

Please get off the high horse. I have a nice watercooling setup, and i know full well i overpaid, and i'm still happy with it. It looks better, it runs cooler, it makes less noise, and it makes the geek in me all fuzzy inside. I can admit i have it for the bling and the want-factor, and i am chuffed to bits with it. Argueing that i dont need it will get you on the arguement that nobody really needs anything more then a q6600 and a gtx8800, and that everyone who upgraded after that is a fool. I have news for you, you are on the wrong website for that message

Ofcourse the RAM is pointless and OTT. The real thing that Kinston is getting wrong here is that it still looks bad and has no interchangable barbs.


well said

I would also like to add that the civic haters are 10 times more annoying than what they hate, which is a good car and has always been.
matt.bungle 30th December 2009, 11:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Cyph3r
Right up there with watercooling your HDD's in terms of pointlessness...

What's the point!!
lamboman 30th December 2009, 22:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by PandaMonster
Water cooled is like saying you drive a fast car when you are driving a Honda Civic.

You think you are a bad ass for having it (you're not) and that air is weak (it's better, actually). You know, no hassle, and only a minimal gain from going to water-cooling. The top air-cooler (probably a noctua) out-does many water-cooling setups. I know this is not the best one (Corsair H50 Cooler) but the Noctua performs better.

Water-cooled ram is like having a boosted Civic (you're still slow) and have to put up with the hassle of tuning your turbo and not breaking your engine all the time. In this case, hoping you have no leaks any where.

Verdict:

Stick with air especially on RAM.

Erm, if you buy a proper water cooled setup, it will out perform an air cooled setup. Water transfers heat better than air...hence why nearly all modern day cars are water cooled, not air cooled...

Stick a few heavily overclocked GTX285s, an i7 at 4.2GHz, about 8 hard drives, into a mid-full size case, and try to keep them cooler than a half decent water cooled setup.

Finally...turbo Civics, when done properly, can be FAST. Strong engines that can take a lot of power with little to no mods, and cheap. It's the OWNERS that are the problem. That can be said for anything, including the enthusiast PC world...

Anyway, this looks like a pretty mediocre implementation of something that's already been done a hell of a lot, and done pretty well at that. (Talking about the memory kit, of course :)
Elton 30th December 2009, 23:25 Quote
I don't think you'll be able to fit all that into a Mid-tower.
lamboman 30th December 2009, 23:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elton
I don't think you'll be able to fit all that into a Mid-tower.

I wasn't thinking mid-tower, I was thinking a slightly smaller full-tower case. Sorry for not making myself clear.
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