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Kingston leaks Clarksdale demo ran DDR3 at 1.35V

Kingston leaks Clarksdale demo ran DDR3 at 1.35V

Kingston's slide showed that Intel ran its Clarksdale DDR3 at just 1.35V

Kingston unveiled today that Intel's Clarksdale IDF demo that showed off a system running at 28W idle and 70W load used specially low voltage 1.35V DDR3, compared to the standard 1.5V, in order to achieve its power goals.

Kingston claimed it is a viable future technology that it is working on (or with, since Kingston is not manufacturing the IC), and not a cheat by Intel.

After reiterating several times today during presentations here in California that Kingston does not talk about any product it doesn't intend to sell, and since this is JEDEC backed and for desktop hardware, not just mobile, this product is likely to be available in some form next year.

Does it also mean more overclocking overhead without heavily overvolting the memory and CPU? We'll see.

Let us know your thoughts, in the forums.

5 Comments

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alwayssts 13th October 2009, 03:59 Quote
Unless I'm missing something, they're probably just using the Elpida 40nm 2Gb chips that were just announced, that use 1.2/1.35v. Sampling in Nov, Mass production at end of year.

They say they have 100% yield at 1600mhz/1.35v, and I've assuming 1.2v is 1333, so yeah, I'm guessing it will overclock well...

If that scaling is a worst-case scenario (since they can get 100% yield with it), that would mean 4GB sticks doing 2133 at 1.65v...As a BASELINE. When chose chips get binned, expect some amazing speeds.

Granted, I don't know the sticks they used in that Clarksdale machine, but really, we're talking what...<2W difference at load for 1gb 1066/1333 at 1.35v compared to 1.5v. They simply used it so the system would consume less than 70W. IIRC it was like 69.6W or something.
Bindibadgi 13th October 2009, 04:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by alwayssts
Unless I'm missing something, they're probably just using the Elpida 40nm 2Gb chips that were just announced, that use 1.2/1.35v. Sampling in Nov, Mass production at end of year.

Yea, we're just saying that it was confirmed that Clarksdale's memory controller supports it. And on the desktop, not just mobile. :)
salesman 13th October 2009, 04:50 Quote
This is news I like hearing.
Jack_Pepsi 13th October 2009, 08:52 Quote
Drool 1.2v 1333MHz - I like the sound of that!

:D
Moyo2k 8th November 2009, 09:13 Quote
leaked accidentally :p, ofcourse
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