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Seagate responds: SSDs still on for late 2009

Seagate responds: SSDs still on for late 2009

The future of Seagate might be less circular than the above company logo would imply.

An analyst has seems to have stirred a hornets nest within Seagate, which has vehemently denied the delay of its Enterprise SSDs - claiming that they will see store shelves before 2010.

After we posted our news piece on the original report, Seagate contacted bit-tech to correct the issue:

"In addition to its existing industry-leading enterprise product lines, Seagate remains committed to solid state development and is on track to deliver its first enterprise SSD product shipments later this calendar year. Seagate has increased its development focus on solid state and will continue to invest the appropriate resources to be successful in this emerging storage market."

Seagate also elaborated: "The Seagate SSD offering will be a product for high-end enterprise computing where we see SSDs creating a new tier of performance and where we see the best-fit application for the technology at this time. Our 30 years of experience and expertise in the enterprise storage segment will enable us to ensure that our SSDs are what are required by the market and that they are compatible with existing storage ecosystems.

Seagate has no plans to get into flash manufacture. Our focus is on making SSDs into IT-ready products that matches the compatibility, standards and capabilities of today’s disk drives."


From the reply above we can ascertain that it won't manufacture NAND Flash, so is Seagate investing in solid state controller technology or is it just buying OEM products and rebranding them into it's own enterprise solution?

Last time I met the ex-Seagate CEO, Bill Watkins, at an event in London late last year, he stressed the importance of owning all the aspects of hard drive manufacture, to guarantee long term stability and business (especially for enterprise). However - in regards to the introduction of solid state - Seagates ethos seems to have changed. With that in mind, we asked if Seagate saw current SSD technology as a short-term whim only, where it does not have to deeply invest?

To this, Seagate simply replied with spin, avoiding specifics, "We are not simply rebranding; this will be a Seagate product. Our strategy is to lead in storage devices, whether they are rotating magnetic devices, solid state or some other storage technology. Therefore we are thinking long-term, not short-term."

Let us know your thoughts in the forums.

5 Comments

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Dreaming 13th July 2009, 18:53 Quote
Oh dear Richard, you're going to land yourself in hot water asking too many questions :p. It's worrying that there hasn't been a breakthrough mass-market SSD yet, but I guess the technology just isn't there yet. With all of Seagate's 'experience' you would think they would focus on this but it just looks like they just want their name represented on the SSD shelves.

Also, what is a 'storage ecosystem' :p. Last time I remember there were no carnivores and herbivores and green plants in my PC.
Turbotab 13th July 2009, 19:03 Quote
As much as I love the idea of a SSD in my system, the industry is going to have to find a way of drastically increasing capacity, beyond simply decreasing node sizes. With 1.5 TB hard drives available for little over £100, and 2 TB parts already dropping in price, mechanical drives are not dead yet.
Cptn-Inafinus 13th July 2009, 19:48 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreaming
Also, what is a 'storage ecosystem' :p. Last time I remember there were no carnivores and herbivores and green plants in my PC.

I thought of that my self. Although it would be nice to have my hard drives evolve into SSD's out of their own free will.
B3CK 13th July 2009, 20:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreaming

Also, what is a 'storage ecosystem' :p. Last time I remember there were no carnivores and herbivores and green plants in my PC.


Green plant drive http://www.engadget.com/2009/01/27/western-digitals-2tb-caviar-green-hard-drive-launches-gets-pre/

and carnivore drive http://www.engadget.com/2008/04/30/western-digital-velociraptor-drive-gets-reviewed/

Couldn't think of any herbavores off the top of my head, but you can still get solar'istic with a http://www.hitachigst.com/portal/site/en/menuitem.8027a91c954924ae4bda9f30eac4f0a0/
Paradigm Shifter 13th July 2009, 20:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbotab
As much as I love the idea of a SSD in my system, the industry is going to have to find a way of drastically increasing capacity, beyond simply decreasing node sizes. With 1.5 TB hard drives available for little over £100, and 2 TB parts already dropping in price, mechanical drives are not dead yet.

And reliability of solid state media as well.

Now, while I know that hard drives aren't going to last forever, I very much doubt that an SSD will last as long as the HDD in my hardware firewall has - that drive is now nearly 14 years old, and has been doing 24/7 duty with logs being near-constantly written to it for more than the last 9.

...

That being said, I asked SuperTalent about availability in the UK of a 64GB SSD I saw on NewEgg for $195. There is one UK retailer of it, and they want £225 for the drive. Now, I know we live in R.O.B, and that the value of the Sterling has taken a hammering over the last few months... but £225 when it's (equivalently) £120 (+ state sales tax) in the US just makes me want to spit.
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