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Intel explains future Core i7, i5, i3 branding

Intel explains future Core i7, i5, i3 branding

Future Intel CPUs will be broadly named over the Core brand, with i3, i5 and i7 "modifiers" depending on performance and features.

Intel has spilled the beans on its future CPU naming, claiming to have acted in an effort to simplify things, but in effect, quite the opposite has happened for us home builders.

The Core 2 Duo and Quad brands will vanish and will be replaced modified progressively after Lynnfield arrives with Core i3, i5 and i7 monikers. That's not to say Lynnfield equals Core i5 though.

Instead, Lynnfield will span Core i5 and Core i7 brands and the choice of brand will vary between features (like HyperThreading) and processor performance.

Intel spins its Core marketing modifier as:

"For example, upcoming processors such as Lynnfield (desktop) will carry the Intel Core brand, but will be available as either Intel Core i5 or Intel Core i7 depending upon the feature set and capability. Clarksfield (mobile) will have the Intel Core i7 name."

That's great for the mass market of users who simply buy whole PC and never open the case: seeing the i3, i5, i7 split should make the performance jumps more transparent as these consumers don't care what socket or memory architecture goes inside. However, for us home builders knowing that you're buying a "Core i7" on LGA1156 or LGA1366 is a big deal, since they are obviously not socket compatible.

"So the key here is there will be a range of features and capabilities within the Intel Core family - our flagship brand representing the highest performance and the latest technology - but simplified into entry-level (Intel Core i3), mid-level (Intel Core i5), and high-level (Intel Core i7)."

What isn't specified are the "features": does this mean HyperThreading, memory channels (two or three) or other components like graphics-on-CPU or even fundamentals like Virtualization?

Intel will continue to use the Atom, Celeron and Pentium brands at the low end in addition to the new three, although with LGA775 Celeron and Pentium CPUs will be phased out within six to 12 months. With regards to notebooks, the Core modifier will also permeate here too and after many years of success, the Centrino branding is finally being retired to cover its WiFi and WIMAX products only.

So, there we are, Lynnfield will fit under the Core i5 brand... and also i7. And although not expressly stated, we expect the Core 2 product line to be remodified to be Core i3, with the refreshed G45 G41 and P43 chipsets. Wonderful.

Is Intel taking a leaf out of Nvidia's marketing exercise books? Let us know your thoughts in the forums.

58 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
[PUNK] crompers 17th June 2009, 19:16 Quote
this is ridiculous, it makes my head spin just reading this, god knows what choosing a proc will be like!

defo taking a leaf out of nvidia's book here, in the worst possible sense
Hoffs 17th June 2009, 19:21 Quote
just a tad confusing.
Goty 17th June 2009, 19:32 Quote
So wait, we're going to have Atom, Celeron, Pentium, Core i3, Core i5, AND Core i7 all at the same time?

... and WHY exactly haven't they fired their entire marketing department, yet?
joe-amnesiac 17th June 2009, 19:38 Quote
So a Core i7 could be a nice 1336 or a useless 1156 socket. Wonderful.

The Core i'x' should be representative of the socket it uses. I hope online retailers have the sense to distinguish between all these.
Bad move Intel.
Icy EyeG 17th June 2009, 20:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe-amnesiac
So a Core i7 could be a nice 1336 or a useless 1156 socket.

Why is the socket 1156 useless?? IMAO the design approach for the socket 1156 will give us more tidy (cheaper?) motherboards (simplified layout with single chipset design) and eventually smaller motherboards too (DTX or ITX).
I've always thought the socket 1336 as a Skulltrail substitute for the enthusiasts (after all this socket is also for Xeons, right?).
Rocket_Knight64 17th June 2009, 20:07 Quote
Er... wat? Have Intel and Nvidia got a little partnership going on here?

Why are ATI the only ones with sane people naming the products?
oasked 17th June 2009, 20:19 Quote
Wat?

If they're phasing out socket 1366 anyway, Core i7 will be almost exclusively 1156 by the sounds of things, with lower end chips being i5.

Its still a bloody mess though.
alpaca 17th June 2009, 20:26 Quote
i could not help but point out you're using the same photo time and time again.
you should maybe put a cheesecake photo instead. or something else that's nice to look at. or another i7 photo.(i assume this photo is relix holding an i7)
adam_bagpuss 17th June 2009, 20:29 Quote
will people stop sayin 1366 is been phased out.

IT NOT

it is just becoming more workstation orientated, later on this yeah 6core intel chip (forogt name) is coming out on skt 1366 not 1156
WildThing 17th June 2009, 20:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by crompers
this is ridiculous, it makes my head spin just reading this, god knows what choosing a proc will be like!

defo taking a leaf out of nvidia's book here, in the worst possible sense

QFT
Icy EyeG 17th June 2009, 20:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by adam_bagpuss
will people stop sayin 1366 is been phased out.

IT NOT

it is just becoming more workstation orientated, later on this yeah 6core intel chip (forogt name) is coming out on skt 1366 not 1156
blu 17th June 2009, 20:40 Quote
i dont care for the naming schemes either, they are flooding the market with too many products. there should be two sockets for intel like there is now the LGA775 for desktop and LGA771 for workstation/server. the rumors were making this huge deal about the core i7 being a big product which it is, but i was disappointed with the announcement of the 1156 being i5 socket because of the upgrade ability limitation when the core i7 is 1366. I feel they are mixing the desktop market and the server/workstation market with how they launched the core i7 and pushed the 1366 socket to the desktop users when the 1156 socket is going to be mainstream.
sear 17th June 2009, 20:41 Quote
Holy ****, Intel, you suck. NVIDIA is bad ,but this is just confusing and makes everything five times more difficult for anyone who doesn't buy through an OEM. Bad move Intel.

P.S. Thanks for phasing out the existing Core i7 processors. I guess the price/performance ratio on the i7 920 is just too good for the end user, huh?
tejas 17th June 2009, 20:41 Quote
Richard, as far as solutions it's quite easy to solve this naming catastrophe from Intel... and that is to buy AMD Phenom II LOL ;) j/k

Lol@Lynnfield branding as Core i7 and i5 that will really confuse matters!
ssj12 17th June 2009, 20:47 Quote
Nvidia taught Intel well.
FeRaL 17th June 2009, 21:03 Quote
Inserts picture of confused looking dogs face...

This is what happens when people with bigger egos than IQs get put in charge...
Richh999 17th June 2009, 21:08 Quote
Nvidia's brand system now looks sane compared to this.. At least you know what range your card is in roughly... Although the 9800GTX or is it a 9800GTX+ or GTS250?? Well I now have no clue to what to buy from intel, an i3 or i5 or i7, what I can gt any of them for each socket, wiat, how do I know which socket each ones for... Are they only bringing out 3 processors for each socket, so i3 is 920, i5 940 and i7 965???
Bindibadgi 17th June 2009, 21:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by adam_bagpuss
will people stop sayin 1366 is been phased out.

IT NOT

it is just becoming more workstation orientated, later on this yeah 6core intel chip (forogt name) is coming out on skt 1366 not 1156

As far as 1366 affordability goes, it's pretty dead.
Turbotab 17th June 2009, 21:31 Quote
i3, i5, i7 desktop/mobile blah blah blah, Intel i8 your naming plans.
oasked 17th June 2009, 21:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindibadgi
As far as 1366 affordability goes, it's pretty dead.

Exactly. Who will be able to afford a $999+ 6-core chip?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbotab
i3, i5, i7 desktop/mobile blah blah blah, Intel i8 your naming plans.

Hehehe, brilliant.
MiNiMaL_FuSS 17th June 2009, 21:41 Quote
I can see the reviews now

- "the i7 on the second socket beats the i5 on the first sockt but the seoncdes sockt has an extra feature for the i7 but then if...balls to it, lets just say the AMD processor wins"
l3v1ck 17th June 2009, 21:48 Quote
Intel seem to have caught Nvidia's naming diarrhoea. The same CPU name for different socket CPU's...... They could easily have said Core i3, i5 and i8 instead of i3, i5, and i7. The switch between 7 and 8 would have made everything clear.
TWeaK 17th June 2009, 21:56 Quote
So what, are Intel and Nvidia employing the same marketing execs now?
ssj12 17th June 2009, 21:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by oasked
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindibadgi
As far as 1366 affordability goes, it's pretty dead.

Exactly. Who will be able to afford a $999+ 6-core chip?

Me, and I will get one... next year.
Cupboard 17th June 2009, 22:36 Quote
I have no idea who thought this would be a good idea.

I think they should have released everything at once, with the current i7s restricted to "Xeon" and then use the new naming system for home users.
Squallers 17th June 2009, 22:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbotab
i3, i5, i7 desktop/mobile blah blah blah, Intel i8 your naming plans.

Winner +rep for outstanding service to punnery
I-E-D 17th June 2009, 23:18 Quote
WTF. why not just have 1 name for each i5/7/9/1111/-900000000000000005?
p-dawg86 17th June 2009, 23:36 Quote
Don't forget that AMD has kind of the same problem with the Phenom and Athlon chips. Yes their organized better but I believe both companies are going to have WAY too many chips on the market - again.
Diosjenin 17th June 2009, 23:41 Quote
So let's see if I have this straight:

1) Core 2 will be rebranded as Core i3 so they can sell off their old stock surplus in the face of a newer product. This is the nVidia equivalent of 9800GTX=GTS250, 8800GT=9600GSO, etc. Horrible move, no matter which company does it. It's like MS looking at all these Vista discs they have lying around, slapping a new "Windows 6" label on them, and re-releasing it alongside Windows 7.

2) Lynnfield (1156) will be branded as both Core i5 and Core i7, depending on whether the specific chip in question is or is not castrated. This is a move so ridiculous, I have trouble seeing even nVidia making an equivalent one. 700MB CDs may have been a step up from 650MB CDs, but nobody went around calling them DVDs. You know why? They weren't. This is disingenuous and misleading at the very best. People will be paying more for what they think will be extra performance that won't show up in the product they receive.

3) Clarksfield (mobile) will be branded as i7 despite the fact that mobile chips are almost universally slower than equivalently priced desktop chips. I know that convincing people that laptops can be just as fast as equivalently priced desktops is a time-honored tradition for Intel and AMD alike, but you'll forgive me if I'm not too happy that they're still finding ways to keep the wool pulled over people's eyes here. Unless you're putting a real i7 (whatever that means now) in your laptop, with identical clock speed and all the same features, you're not getting an "i7," you're getting an "i5." The problem is the same as in the previous point - people will pay more for performance that they won't end up receiving in the product.

4) "True" Core i7 chips (i.e. 1366/Nehalem) will be f***ing expensive. I understand that from a purely business standpoint, Intel needed something to compete with Phenom II while they were prepping Lynnfield, but to remove that product from all but the highest end of the market once that gap is filled only serves to keep the best performance away from all but the richest enthusiasts; more money for them, less power for us.

Another reason to buy AMD. At least their naming schema (both CPU and GPU) follow comprehensible formulas and guarantee compatibility.

consumerist.com had better start hounding Intel for this.


- Diosjenin -
Elton 18th June 2009, 00:02 Quote
Not even Nvidia did this bad..

Well, AMD, you're my next build target.
Icy EyeG 18th June 2009, 01:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindibadgi
As far as 1366 affordability goes, it's pretty dead.

Yep, everyone that rushed to buy a 1366 Core i7 system based in the Core i7 920 hoping to upgrade later to a new CPU in the same price range was pwned by Intel.
Cupboard 18th June 2009, 02:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icy EyeG
Yep, everyone that rushed to buy a 1366 Core i7 system based in the Core i7 920 hoping to upgrade later to a new CPU in the same price range was pwned by Intel.

I don't see why this is the case - the new ones will drop in price eventually then an upgrade can be had.

The 920 is a good processor by itself and so will last for long enough that affordable 6-core+ processors will be around.
livenoise 18th June 2009, 02:40 Quote
What's the problem... just look at the processor specs when they come out and buy the one which has what you're after... who cares what it's called?
thehippoz 18th June 2009, 02:58 Quote
that ntune guy gets around
Turbotab 18th June 2009, 03:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupboard
I don't see why this is the case - the new ones will drop in price eventually then an upgrade can be had.

The 920 is a good processor by itself and so will last for long enough that affordable 6-core+ processors will be around.

You speak truth, I've already forgotten about the sexa-core Gulfstown, even my Q6700 will be fine until late 2010 when Sandy Bridge is launched.
general22 18th June 2009, 04:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Article
And although not expressly stated, we expect the Core 2 product line to be remodified to be Core i3, with the refreshed G45 G41 and P43 chipsets. Wonderful.

Um is making this kind of statement really acceptable in a news article? I mean if it is not stated then why put that in there?
Diosjenin 18th June 2009, 06:37 Quote
UPDATE: Looks like Anandtech has a little more information.

- Diosjenin -
-EVRE- 18th June 2009, 06:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by general22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Article
And although not expressly stated, we expect the Core 2 product line to be remodified to be Core i3, with the refreshed G45 G41 and P43 chipsets. Wonderful.

Um is making this kind of statement really acceptable in a news article? I mean if it is not stated then why put that in there?

^^ looks like an Intel troll.

because Bit-Tech is probably right...

I dont get why any product would need to be renamed. People like and TRUST consistency. What Nvidia and Intel are doing is like the magicians cup trick.
JaredC01 18th June 2009, 06:53 Quote
So from a system builder's standpoint, would I be better off building an i7 setup BEFORE the change?
Jenny_Y8S 18th June 2009, 07:53 Quote
Am I the only person that thinks this naming convention is a good idea?

What has been the main criticism about CPU / GPU naming conventions? From what I've seen it's that the "layman" couldn't tell if one was faster than the other by number alone.

Now as I understand it, an i7 will be "better" than an "i5"?

Sounds good to me
Bindibadgi 18th June 2009, 08:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by general22
Um is making this kind of statement really acceptable in a news article? I mean if it is not stated then why put that in there?

Because they say the Core 2 lines will be phased out, but since the processors will stay for a while longer the only logical choice is they become i3's. The G41/P43 refresh boards will come in Sept. also, as other LGA775 chipsets like the P45 become EOL sometime in that quarter.
bassboi72 18th June 2009, 09:59 Quote
I guess Atom will be for Windows XP/Windows 7 Starter on netbooks... Celeron & Pentium for Windows 7 Starter/Home Basic on desktops... Core i3, Core i5, AND Core i7 for Windows 7 Home Premium and above.

But wait, 5 different CPUs with different speeds... and a different socket for some of them. Wouldn't that be somewhere near at least 20+ different configurations to choose from?!

Insanity!
Burnout21 18th June 2009, 10:20 Quote
ah wonderful, Intel has just done what nvidia has been up to.
kenco_uk 18th June 2009, 10:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by adam_bagpuss
will people stop sayin 1366 is been phased out.

IT NOT

it is just becoming more workstation orientated, later on this yeah 6core intel chip (forogt name) is coming out on skt 1366 not 1156

Socket 1366 needed to be kept for the server/workstation market, replacing (or rebranding) Xeons.

Intel should've hung on to release Socket 1156 for the home market.

There's nothing wrong with the 'current' LGA775/Core2 setup atm.
Icy EyeG 18th June 2009, 11:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupboard
I don't see why this is the case - the new ones will drop in price eventually then an upgrade can be had.

The 920 is a good processor by itself and so will last for long enough that affordable 6-core+ processors will be around.

Well I honestly think that unless the higher Socket 1156 CPU never goes higher than the €200 price point, Intel will systematically phase out the lower end Socket 1366 CPUs instead of dropping prices. Otherwise they'll promote "competition" between both sockets. That's why I think that Core i7 920 was an exception in terms of price and we won't see that again with the arrival of the Socket 1156 CPUs. However, this is just my opinion and I do hope I'm wrong.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenco_uk
Socket 1366 needed to be kept for the server/workstation market, replacing (or rebranding) Xeons.

Intel should've hung on to release Socket 1156 for the home market.

There's nothing wrong with the 'current' LGA775/Core2 setup atm.

I completely agree. If Intel cared about the average consumer they would have released the Socket 1156 CPUs first and reserve the Socket 1366 CPUs for the server/workstation market and the ultra-enthusiast users (like Skulltrail).
antaresIII 18th June 2009, 11:47 Quote
Nvidia never did something this bad; the base product was so good that it lasted for a very long time (till g300) covering two ati's generations. If the competitor calls steps generations, than the one making jumps has marketing problems.
Intel on the other hand is not capable of making jumps any more because it has hit the wall of their licence-armor x86 architecture. They (ab)used the last big core2 to build a marketing platform which should hide the performance still-stand when going over 3 cores. The tech customers are however something very different from those keen on cosmetics (L'Oreal,Vichy,...). The novelty of an excellent 4core has weared out long ago. We only needed an optimization of the platform (ddr and sli/crossfire). This optimization(x58) was then sold by Intel in the same way as salad on the market where they dip it in water before weighting it. Only 1% of customers was willing to open the purses. The greed was left hungering; now they've got themselves experts in blackmailing.
Many of us had big hopes in Cell (IBM) PC, however the company decided again against customers and tech in favor of "their" small blue.
general22 18th June 2009, 11:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindibadgi
Because they say the Core 2 lines will be phased out, but since the processors will stay for a while longer the only logical choice is they become i3's. The G41/P43 refresh boards will come in Sept. also, as other LGA775 chipsets like the P45 become EOL sometime in that quarter.

Oh so it's a rebrand to clear stock then?
Quote:
Originally Posted by -EVRE-
^^ looks like an Intel troll.

because Bit-Tech is probably right...

Kill yourself idiot, I can't even ask a question without being branded a troll.
Chocobollz 18th June 2009, 17:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diosjenin
So let's see if I have this straight:

1) Core 2 will be rebranded as Core i3 so they can sell off their old stock surplus in the face of a newer product. This is the nVidia equivalent of 9800GTX=GTS250, 8800GT=9600GSO, etc. Horrible move, no matter which company does it. It's like MS looking at all these Vista discs they have lying around, slapping a new "Windows 6" label on them, and re-releasing it alongside Windows 7.

2) Lynnfield (1156) will be branded as both Core i5 and Core i7, depending on whether the specific chip in question is or is not castrated. This is a move so ridiculous, I have trouble seeing even nVidia making an equivalent one. 700MB CDs may have been a step up from 650MB CDs, but nobody went around calling them DVDs. You know why? They weren't. This is disingenuous and misleading at the very best. People will be paying more for what they think will be extra performance that won't show up in the product they receive.

3) Clarksfield (mobile) will be branded as i7 despite the fact that mobile chips are almost universally slower than equivalently priced desktop chips. I know that convincing people that laptops can be just as fast as equivalently priced desktops is a time-honored tradition for Intel and AMD alike, but you'll forgive me if I'm not too happy that they're still finding ways to keep the wool pulled over people's eyes here. Unless you're putting a real i7 (whatever that means now) in your laptop, with identical clock speed and all the same features, you're not getting an "i7," you're getting an "i5." The problem is the same as in the previous point - people will pay more for performance that they won't end up receiving in the product.

4) "True" Core i7 chips (i.e. 1366/Nehalem) will be f***ing expensive. I understand that from a purely business standpoint, Intel needed something to compete with Phenom II while they were prepping Lynnfield, but to remove that product from all but the highest end of the market once that gap is filled only serves to keep the best performance away from all but the richest enthusiasts; more money for them, less power for us.

Another reason to buy AMD. At least their naming schema (both CPU and GPU) follow comprehensible formulas and guarantee compatibility.

consumerist.com had better start hounding Intel for this.


- Diosjenin -

My thoughts on your comments:

1 & 2) Yes, it maybe a problem for us enthusiast but for Joe Higashi.. err, Joe Dirt? Um.. Joe average, they'll simply ignores it because they don't know that it's a rebranded products. And even if they, I think they won't think it as a problem because it's Intel anyway, everything made by Intel should be good.

3) I don't think laptop's CPUs were slower than an equivalent desktop CPUs anymore nowadays. IMO, it's not the CPU which should be blamed for the slower performance, it's mroe like the other components can't keep up with the CPU, eg. the onboard GPUs, slower RAMs, slower HDD, etc. So the CPU itself is actually a little faster than their desktop equivalent, they're just can't be pushed like their desktop counterparts because of the environment they must live in; the cooling system and the max heat dissipation which must be lower because you wouldn't want your lap to burn while you're using your laptop, don't you? ;-)

Anyhow, I would say Intel would be able to walk out of this problem safely. I really don't get it why only Valve seems to be troubled with all of this "rebranding" problems? XD nVidia did this for years and their sales still on top.. why??? ~_~
-EVRE- 18th June 2009, 19:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by general22

Kill yourself idiot, I can't even ask a question without being branded a troll.

cmon, you have to admit your statement would read exactly what an Intel troll would post.
Don't want to be branded a troll, don't post like one.
Quote:
Um is making this kind of statement really acceptable in a news article? I mean if it is not stated then why put that in there?

you should have just asked why Bit-Tech thought Intel was going to rebrand its chipsets. I respect what Bit-Tech writes, so far they haven't made foolish statements.
Quote:
Kill yourself idiot

You sir, need to grow up before you post on these boards..
Sir Digby 18th June 2009, 19:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by general22

Kill yourself idiot, I can't even ask a question without being branded a troll.

Angry Internet Man

I'm quite glad that my C2D 6750 is still fine for me even at stock speed in a poor motherboard with slow memory. My next upgrade will be to a better motherboard and memory - then seriously looking at AMD unless Intel sort out this mess.
pimonserry 18th June 2009, 20:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anandtech article
The LGA-1156 Core i7s will be the 8xx series, while the LGA-1366 i7s will be the 9xx series. The i5s will be the 6xx series and the i3s will be the 5xx series.

Looks like the i7 8-- series will be the ones to have then ;)

Unless you make a boycott decision and move to AMD :)

This still isn't QUITE as bad as NVidia's renaming I think, as NVidia were trying to pull off old products as ones in the new range, despite fundamentally being the same product.
i3 is the only one Intel are doing like this, which isn't so bad, as I can see the people buying i3 will be the sort of people who don't care much what processor is inside.

Socket 1156 i7 chips will be the way forwards I reckon (overclocking/bang-for-buck wise).
Elton 18th June 2009, 22:22 Quote
Well, I'm getting a X4 940 BE or a X4 920, just because it's cheaper..
javaman 19th June 2009, 00:36 Quote
Reading through that and the comments I think ive worked someting out that makes sense, at least to me. The brand will reflect the quality of the part but in the sense of if the part is full functioning ie. full cache and running at intended clock speed rather than a cut down version of a top end part. i7 is top end so socket 1366 is it will all be top parts along with the cream of 1156 and laptop parts (since laptops parts need low power useage will same speeds). i5 is i7s with missing cache and lower clock speeds. Any comments on this suggestion or has the hamster died but the wheel is still spinning?? lol
general22 19th June 2009, 01:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by -EVRE-
cmon, you have to admit your statement would read exactly what an Intel troll would post.
Don't want to be branded a troll, don't post like one.

Maybe you should figure out what a troll is before branding people as one. You are just one of those typical forumers who are always quick to use the troll argument on anyone's opinion they disagree with. It wasn't a troll post at all, I was wondering why they had put in such a prediction in a news article as they don't normally seem to do that on bit tech.

Quote:
Originally Posted by -EVRE-
you should have just asked why Bit-Tech thought Intel was going to rebrand its chipsets. I respect what Bit-Tech writes, so far they haven't made foolish statements.

I didn't say anything about foolishness on the part of Bit-Tech. I also didn't say they were wrong. Please go back to primary school and learn some reading comprehension.
HourBeforeDawn 19th June 2009, 01:56 Quote
so AMD/ATI is like for the most part the only "honest" company in this field
dec 21st June 2009, 13:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali Nield
just a tad confusing.

understatement of the year. fitting after the gts 250 shenanigans.
Ending Credits 21st June 2009, 14:07 Quote
One thing that made me laugh was looking at the Phenom II categories on Scan.

$ categories for Phenom II, one ategory with a single processor in it, one has two processors and then 3 and then 4 processors in each category.
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