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Lynnfield overclocks to 5GHz

Lynnfield overclocks to 5GHz

Sources at Taiwanese motherboard manufacturers say initial overclocking tests have been somewhat surprising.

COMPUTEX 2009: Several sources at Taiwanese motherboard manufacturers have said that Lynnfield is going to be a dream to overclock with early samples hitting 5GHz... on air cooling.

Intel has remained mum on Lynnfield’s details, but its partners are very keen to talk about it. The Turbo mode, which dynamically adjusts the CPU frequency to deliver the maximum performance for the given thermal design power, will “add something north of 500MHz” to the CPU’s default clock speed in single threaded applications said an Intel spokesperson.

Our sources indicated that you are, in fact, likely to see an extra 600MHz for free in single threaded apps. This means the rumoured high-end 3.2GHz Lynnfield chip will hum along at 3.8GHz in some workloads, which is much more than the current Core i7 processors, which get an extra 200MHz or so for free when there’s power to spare.

This obviously means great things for overclocking and contrary to other reports we’ve read on the ‘net, it looks like Lynnfield is going to hit those 1GHz+ overclocks we’ve seen on the current Core i7 chips because 5GHz is “easily achievable,” said one source. Another said that they’d hit 5GHz “with very little effort,” which could make for some exciting times if you’re a cost-conscious enthusiast.

Obviously, we’ll reserve our final judgement until we’ve looked at how retail CPUs are overclocking, but these early whispers are looking promising.

Got a thought? Tell us in the forums.

38 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
dec 3rd June 2009, 12:35 Quote
awww man the 4ghz club is getting shut down already?
DragunovHUN 3rd June 2009, 12:45 Quote
Too many Intel news too frequently. What is someone looking to upgrade supposed to do now?
Zero_UK 3rd June 2009, 13:09 Quote
Lol, Agreed Dragun. I think I may just wait till the end of the year to get a i5 and GTX3##
Dreaming 3rd June 2009, 13:12 Quote
That's extremely impressive!

I will be waiting in anticipation for Bit-Tech's review :D
g3n3tiX 3rd June 2009, 13:24 Quote
What socket does it use ? (ie. Can it replace a Core i7 ?)
V3ctor 3rd June 2009, 13:25 Quote
Then... i7... What is it for? Only because of the tripple channel?
Paradigm Shifter 3rd June 2009, 13:27 Quote
It uses socket 1156, so no, it can't replace an i7 (which uses socket 1366)

This all sounds very wonderful, but if they're ES chips, means bugger all. Show me retail available chips doing this without breaking a sweat (and not getting close to their thermal limit) and I'll think about getting enthusiastic.
Baz 3rd June 2009, 13:39 Quote
5Ghz Quad Core you say? Phwooaarrr!
sub routine 3rd June 2009, 13:51 Quote
wowee
technogiant 3rd June 2009, 14:20 Quote
So why is it so much better at overclocking than Core i7?....I would imagine another stepping of the latter will be out soon with similar performance?
Icy EyeG 3rd June 2009, 14:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by V3ctor
Then... i7... What is it for? Only because of the tripple channel?

i5 and i7 are completely different in terms of interconnection with the rest of the components in the motherboard.
IMAO, the i5's biggest limitation is the number of PCIe lanes that come from the CPU directly (20?). Of course that this isn't a problem for the majority of consumers (you can split 16 lanes across two PEG slots). So apparently the i7 is for workstations (that don't need ECC RAM?) and enthusiasts (like the Skulltrail was, only this time is cheaper and less power hungry, I think)...
BlackDiamond 3rd June 2009, 14:52 Quote
Intel was trying to get the CPUs with the highest profit margin that are based on the Nehalem architecture to the market as soon as possible - the Xeons. They didn't have a new ICH ready so they gave use the X58 + ICH10R and a non-Xeon chip for the Enthusiast market. That way they had presence in the high-end user segment that bought them enough time to complete the Nehalem architecture. i7 has a lot in common with the Xeons because it is a server chip that was made available to the high end market, while the mainstream product, the i5 uses a different design that is much better suited for desktop users. For example, the PCIe lanes to the video cards are connected directly to the CPU and do not go through the Northbridge - which possibly means better performance in the i5 than in the i7.
BTW socket 1156 has different mounting holes than 775 AND 1366 - what a ripoff!
I for one think that Intel has screwed us over with yet another one of their temporary solutions just to buy themselves enough time to create the "real" solution. I will stick to my overclocked Q6700 until i5 comes out.
Kasius 3rd June 2009, 15:52 Quote
Big-pimping.. Thats my next build on hold, look forward to seeing the bit-tech review :D
stonedsurd 3rd June 2009, 16:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackDiamond
Intel was trying to get the CPUs with the highest profit margin that are based on the Nehalem architecture to the market as soon as possible - the Xeons. They didn't have a new ICH ready so they gave use the X58 + ICH10R and a non-Xeon chip for the Enthusiast market. That way they had presence in the high-end user segment that bought them enough time to complete the Nehalem architecture. i7 has a lot in common with the Xeons because it is a server chip that was made available to the high end market, while the mainstream product, the i5 uses a different design that is much better suited for desktop users. For example, the PCIe lanes to the video cards are connected directly to the CPU and do not go through the Northbridge - which possibly means better performance in the i5 than in the i7.
BTW socket 1156 has different mounting holes than 775 AND 1366 - what a ripoff!
I for one think that Intel has screwed us over with yet another one of their temporary solutions just to buy themselves enough time to create the "real" solution. I will stick to my overclocked Q6700 until i5 comes out.
Quite so.
Xtrafresh 3rd June 2009, 16:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackDiamond
Intel was trying to get the CPUs with the highest profit margin that are based on the Nehalem architecture to the market as soon as possible - the Xeons. They didn't have a new ICH ready so they gave use the X58 + ICH10R and a non-Xeon chip for the Enthusiast market. That way they had presence in the high-end user segment that bought them enough time to complete the Nehalem architecture. i7 has a lot in common with the Xeons because it is a server chip that was made available to the high end market, while the mainstream product, the i5 uses a different design that is much better suited for desktop users. For example, the PCIe lanes to the video cards are connected directly to the CPU and do not go through the Northbridge - which possibly means better performance in the i5 than in the i7.
BTW socket 1156 has different mounting holes than 775 AND 1366 - what a ripoff!
I for one think that Intel has screwed us over with yet another one of their temporary solutions just to buy themselves enough time to create the "real" solution. I will stick to my overclocked Q6700 until i5 comes out.
Truth in there mate.

I'm not sure Intel screwed us over, Core i7 was never intended to be a real desktop superstar. It's a workstation part through and through.

It's released for those of us that care enough to cater to our ePeen addiction, but aside from that they kept working on pricing and refreshing their 775 lineup. It's been clear from the start that 1366 was never meant to replace 775, that is the task of the 1156. From these early reports, and based on what Anand recently published, that will be done pretty well. A 5GHz quad will do very well, thanks very much
I-E-D 3rd June 2009, 16:54 Quote
Might be a reason not to get the i7 920 then :)
Samek1337 3rd June 2009, 17:05 Quote
Now that's a pity. Now I realised, that I should have waited to i5 + GTX 3xx, but noooo, I had to rush it and get an i7 and a GTX 295, what a dumbass. But now I'll have them money to buy me two SSD's and 12GB of 1800MHz RAM, and that will make my ePeen grow quite a bit. :)
Jojii 3rd June 2009, 17:42 Quote
Breaking news: Technology products go obsolete quickly. Internet users shocked.
Xtrafresh 3rd June 2009, 17:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jojii
Breaking news: Technology products go obsolete quickly. Internet users shocked.
Nominated for win!
Cptn-Inafinus 3rd June 2009, 18:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jojii
Breaking news: Technology products go obsolete quickly. Internet users shocked.

I lol'd.
Combatus 3rd June 2009, 18:11 Quote
Holy guacamole!!!
Skiddywinks 3rd June 2009, 18:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jojii
Breaking news: Technology products go obsolete quickly. Internet users shocked.

:P

+1
Turbotab 3rd June 2009, 18:44 Quote
If the i5 can overclock to 5 GHz on air, then it should become the gamer's must have sexy beast and absolutely ruin AMD's year. On the bright side Phenom II should be in for a hefty discount.
Skiddywinks 3rd June 2009, 19:40 Quote
Agreed. i5 is definitely shaping up to be a gamer's dream come true. 4 cores, 8 threads, and 5GHz. What more can you want? It would sort you out for years.
Omnituens 3rd June 2009, 19:56 Quote
.... are there any dual 1156 socket mobo's planned that support multi-gpu?

Just in case i win the lottery.

...

IT COULD HAPPEN.
Madness_3d 3rd June 2009, 20:12 Quote
they said the same about phenom II and getting above 3.8 on air is nigh impossible so I'll take it with a pinch of salt
Combatus 3rd June 2009, 21:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiddywinks
4 cores, 8 threads, and 5GHz. What more can you want?
+1!
Skill3d 3rd June 2009, 22:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiddywinks
What more can you want?
a beer and a cheesecake! if it's all included in one package I'm lost
HourBeforeDawn 3rd June 2009, 23:11 Quote
so if the i5 is better per say then the i7 why not for marketing sake give it a well bigger number like say the i9 or something, then again calling it i9 might make people thing crap how much is that going to cost where as i5 does make it sound cheaper then i7 ehh I guess I will have to read into this some more.
RotoSequence 3rd June 2009, 23:39 Quote
If Lynnfield can easily push 5 GHz on air, I wonder what Clarksdale will do. Barring serious problems with the 32nm node, things should be... interesting. ;)
OWNED66 4th June 2009, 03:01 Quote
Lynnfield processor

The first Nehalem generation processor designs already exist. They are intended for use in server systems. Bloomfield processors and Gainestown LGA 1366 will appear in the fourth quarter 2008. The first samples of Lynnfield and Havendale processors LGA 1160 will appear in the third quarter 2008, mass production will be deployed in the first half 2009, and the announcement will be closer to mid-year 2009. 8 Core Nehalem generation processors will be presented in the server segment in the second half year 2009. They will be produced in 45 nm technology, the TDP will be limited to the value of 130 Watts.
thehippoz 4th June 2009, 03:35 Quote
oh my lord XD
Icy EyeG 4th June 2009, 13:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackDiamond

BTW socket 1156 has different mounting holes than 775 AND 1366 - what a ripoff!

That, I didn't know. That's really stupid.... :(
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackDiamond

I for one think that Intel has screwed us over with yet another one of their temporary solutions just to buy themselves enough time to create the "real" solution. I will stick to my overclocked Q6700 until i5 comes out.

Yep, I'll also upgrade to i5... I simply don't need more than 20 PCIe lanes on my system.
However, I won't upgrade until the TDP drops... I'll probably upgrade first to a 9550S (only has 65W) if the prices drop (I have a 6600 right now).
weeez 7th June 2009, 18:32 Quote
Oh crap now what do I do?
wuyanxu 8th June 2009, 00:36 Quote
different' sockets are no problem, just buy a mounting kit. (should be thought of it when choosing your coolers ;) TRUE F.TW)

for multi-socket i5, i don't think it's doable, Quickpath is what's used in these i* CPUs, and i think it's been used up internally to the PCIe bridge inside the CPU.
gavomatic57 8th June 2009, 09:47 Quote
More proof that it pays to miss one upgrade out. My Q6600 is still plenty, but I have to admit, 8 threads would be very nice...
retrogamer1990 19th August 2009, 20:24 Quote
Someone already said this, that these are Engineering Sample chips, which pretty much means nothing when you compare their overclocking ability to the retail ones people can actually buy. They cherry-pick the absolute best, most perfect chips to use as ES becuase then the press will be wooed by the overclocks they acheive. same thing happened with i7...however they are still all brilliant overclockers, so hey, maybe not 5ghz on all i5's, but i'd say 4ghz will be acheiveable on the majority of chips.

Im wondering though, if i5, which is supposedly intels new higher/mid range platform, can reach similar clocks and performance as the i7's which are the enthusiast (read: nerd's) platform at a lower cost, what incentive will there be for consumers to buy the i7?
retrogamer1990 19th August 2009, 20:25 Quote
oh and also, the IHS on that cjip in the pic is REALLY convex lol :D
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