bit-tech.net

New tech boasts massive storage boost

New tech boasts massive storage boost

Forget Blu-ray - the new technology currently in development holds the promise of 250 DVDs worth of content in a coin-sized space.

Everyone's favourite sci-fi buzzword – nanotechnology – holds the promise of a new breakthrough in storage densities according to researchers.

As reported by The Industry Standard, a team of scientists working at the University of Massachusetts and the University of California at Berkeley have finalised a paper on a technology which could fit the equivalent of 250 DVDs worth of data on something the size of a coin.

The researchers – lead by Thomas Russell and Ting Xu – have discovered an innovative new way to create polymer chains that spontaneously join together, known as “block copolymers.” The new process – which uses sapphire crystals heated to 1500 degrees Celsius to guide the chains of polymers into the exact shapes required – promises to pack molecules tightly enough to achieve a storage density of 125GB per square inch – some fifteen times the density of currently available technologies – with no defects in the medium.

The team isn't just looking towards data storage, either: the discovery has potential implications for large-screen displays – which could end up with significantly smaller pixels sizes and higher resolutions than is currently possible – and solar panels which would be far more efficient at capturing the sun's rays. The researchers are even hopeful that the technology could be applied to the production of CPUs, allowing for features to be created as small as 3nm – a far cry from the current 45nm and 35nm processes.

While the technology behind the research isn't ready for commercialisation yet, the team is hopeful that the work they have done could result in marketable products within the next ten years.

Are you looking forward to increased storage densities, or is the thought of a processor based around a 3nm process getting your juices flowing? Perhaps you'll need to see some evidence of the technology in action before you'll be throwing a party? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

29 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Jack_Pepsi 2nd March 2009, 15:22 Quote
If they're small, I'd just lose the bloody things.
Burnout21 2nd March 2009, 15:44 Quote
so what 10 years away from a commerical product, of super ultra HD screens with great video and audio bit-rates.
p3n 2nd March 2009, 15:59 Quote
Just think how much data Jackass can put up their anus!
devdevil85 2nd March 2009, 16:56 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Article
While the technology behind the research isn't ready for commercialisation yet, the team is hopeful that the work they have done could result in marketable products within the next ten years.
and there you have it folks....
scarrmrcc 2nd March 2009, 17:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnout21
so what 10 years away from a commerical product, of super ultra HD screens with great video and audio bit-rates.

you know that makes me wonder...what are we going to call things in like..10 generations?
super ultra mega uber cheesecake Highest of the high definition?
outlawaol 2nd March 2009, 17:10 Quote
Sounds like a promising tech.

Hello super fast insane storage hand held devices. Anyone else getting the sense of the pads from star trek? (I know I just geeked it up a notch, lol)
Omnituens 2nd March 2009, 17:16 Quote
This is a huge step.
3nm with no voltage leak?!
Arkanrais 2nd March 2009, 17:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarrmrcc
you know that makes me wonder...what are we going to call things in like..10 generations?
super ultra mega uber cheesecake Highest of the high definition?
Damnit, now I'm hungry and want a higher res display.
HourBeforeDawn 2nd March 2009, 17:49 Quote
WOW why must they tease us like this ~_~
s3v3n 2nd March 2009, 18:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarrmrcc
you know that makes me wonder...what are we going to call things in like..10 generations?
super ultra mega uber cheesecake Highest of the high definition?

"Expensive"
Darkened 2nd March 2009, 18:19 Quote
Well in 10 years they damn well should be ready with these kinds of techniques, cause in 10 years the amount of data to be stored or handled will be par with the techniques as well.

What I mean is that what might seem like overkill or at least amazing possibilities now, the requirements then will make them useful or even necessary just to do your work or play a game.

Just my thoughts, but will probably stand behind them in 10 years :)

Darkened
kenco_uk 2nd March 2009, 18:25 Quote
I suggest the following:

bit
byte
Kilobyte
Megabyte
Gigabyte
Terabyte
Petabyte
Exabyte
Zettabyte
Yottabyte

and then..

Boomheadshotbyte
Relixbyte
Cheesecakebyte
Nicb 2nd March 2009, 18:32 Quote
We need technology like this to be discovered. We have BlueRay becoming increasingly popular and it sure does take up a lot of room on my current hard drives. We have home theaters just waiting for this.
Awoken 2nd March 2009, 18:57 Quote
...whatever happened to 'Holographic Storage'?
Jojii 2nd March 2009, 19:02 Quote
NOT ENOUGH CHEESECAKE
Mister_Tad 2nd March 2009, 19:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awoken
...whatever happened to 'Holographic Storage'?

Holographic storage is just around the corner, still... like it has been for 10 years
pendragon 2nd March 2009, 19:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awoken
...whatever happened to 'Holographic Storage'?

I wonder this as well :|
firefly 2nd March 2009, 19:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenco_uk

and then..

Boomheadshotbyte
Relixbyte
Cheesecakebyte

lol, +1
JrRRr 2nd March 2009, 20:17 Quote
Quote:"..250 DVDs worth of data on something the size of a coin." Yeah, but did they mention the size pf the coin: http://travel.webshots.com/photo/1423174581059224444NlzZAf

Maybe they'll start calling Terrabyte for Teby, so we'll get
Mega Teby
Giga Teby
Terra Teby
..imagine how much a cheesecake-teby is going to be.. :-o
pistol_pete 2nd March 2009, 21:26 Quote
3nm sounds cool, but will it really be better than a Q6600?

Some say, yes.
Top Nurse 2nd March 2009, 21:35 Quote
Bought a Viewsonic CRT about 8-9 years ago and just got my first LCD. 10 years from now sounds perfect!
chicorasia 2nd March 2009, 23:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by s3v3n
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarrmrcc
you know that makes me wonder...what are we going to call things in like..10 generations?
super ultra mega uber cheesecake Highest of the high definition?

"Expensive"

+1
DXR_13KE 3rd March 2009, 01:32 Quote
hmmm, 10 years in technology... considering the evolution of technology during the last 10 years... this sounds promising...
Major 3rd March 2009, 02:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awoken
...whatever happened to 'Holographic Storage'?

Has been delayed to late 2009, but, will be, very very expensive.
ChaosDefinesOrder 3rd March 2009, 10:12 Quote
leetbyte?
diablo1616 3rd March 2009, 11:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jojii
NOT ENOUGH CHEESECAKE

The cake is a lie....
Zeus-Nolan 4th March 2009, 12:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by JrRRr
Quote:"..250 DVDs worth of data on something the size of a coin." Yeah, but did they mention the size pf the coin: http://travel.webshots.com/photo/1423174581059224444NlzZAf

Maybe they'll start calling Terrabyte for Teby, so we'll get
Mega Teby
Giga Teby
Terra Teby
..imagine how much a cheesecake-teby is going to be.. :-o

lol
ParaHelix.org 4th March 2009, 15:59 Quote
Good research and development, now lets see some implimentation.
Fritzr 5th March 2009, 11:44 Quote
Holographic storage is available now. Limited to only 300GB per disc it is scheduled to go to 1.6TB per disk . Inphase released the Tapestry 300r Apr 2007 and promised the Tapestry 800r (800GB) 18-24 months later. A bit pricey when first put on market the drive was priced at US$18000 and the 300GB disks were US$120-US$180 each. These are WORM drives or in a more familiar acronym form HVD-R

There is also an HVD consortium that was supposed to be demoing a 3.9TB drive a few years ago, but they do not yet have a commercial offering.

This tech looks like it will give the HVD a run for the money :)
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