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Nvidia has a QPI license

Nvidia has a QPI license

Tom Petersen, Director of Technical Marketing for Nvidia's chipset business, says that Nvidia has a QPI license.

Following a discussion with Tom Petersen, Director of Technical Marketing for Nvidia’s chipset business, it became apparent that Nvidia does indeed have a QPI license to make chipsets for Intel’s Bloomfield processors.

Petersen was adamant that Nvidia’s cross-licensing agreement with Intel includes a Quick Path Interface licence, enabling the company to develop chipsets for Intel’s latest processors.

We chose to focus our engineering resources on developing DMI chipsets [for mainstream Lynnfield and Havendale processors] at this time,” explained Petersen. He then added that just because Nvidia isn’t releasing a QPI-based chipset initially, it doesn’t mean there won’t be QPI-based chipsets in the future.

Unlike Bloomfield, both Lynnfield and Havendale use the DMI chipset interconnect instead of the faster QPI; however, with both the memory controller and PCI-Express now on the CPU it’s questionable what Nvidia can bring to the table. Of course, it can enable things like SLI Memory through the BIOS, but then so can any other BIOS developer - what we hope to see is boards that support both SLI Memory and XMP (Intel's version of the technology).

To enable SLI, Nvidia will essentially need to connect its NF200 chip to the CPU’s integrated PCI-Express bus and then create its own south bridge with a similar set of features to ICH10. Of course, SLI could be enabled with a hefty number of lanes available in the south bridge, but then the data streams from the GPU have to contend with other data moving between CPU, integrated memory controller and south bridge across the same bus.

There is no confirmation—let alone timeframe—for when we can expect to see an nForce chipset for Bloomfield or any future QPI-based processors and given that there’s already SLI support on Nvidia-certified X58 motherboards, I’m not convinced we’ll see one any time soon.

Do you think Nvidia will release an nForce chipset for Bloomfield? Discuss in the forums.

4 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
bowman 29th August 2008, 15:04 Quote
I just don't get why they didn't do this. They no longer have to bother with the memory controller. They could do a repeat of the NF4 for AMD with this platform launch, their chipset division could've striked back. I guess they have other plans.
wuyanxu 29th August 2008, 15:10 Quote
so they focus the SLi for high end users on cheaper CPU socket?

please someone explain to me how does the Nehalem line works? Bloomfield is high end socket 1336, Lynnfield and Havendale is midrange, socket 1100something) without IOH? (how can CPU have less pins while not having a IOH? )

dudging im using quad core and P35 midrange motherboards with single graphics card, which CPU shall i buy? Bloomfield or Lynnfield?
biebiep 29th August 2008, 15:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuyanxu
so they focus the SLi for high end users on cheaper CPU socket?

please someone explain to me how does the Nehalem line works? Bloomfield is high end socket 1336, Lynnfield and Havendale is midrange, socket 1100something) without IOH? (how can CPU have less pins while not having a IOH? )

dudging im using quad core and P35 midrange motherboards with single graphics card, which CPU shall i buy? Bloomfield or Lynnfield?

Neither, ppl with P35/P45 and a Quad have no reason whatsoever to upgrade to Nehalem (unless you're talking bragging rights). Better now to wait for benchies and stuff and then maybe purchase the 32nm die shrink of Nehalem (Westmere?)

P45 Chipset and a Q9650 or P35/Q6600 are good enough to last you trough Nehalem and wait for the refresh, since Nehalem isn't much better at gaming. Only if you plan on doing LOTS of highly-optimized multithreadeded apps, then you will see big differences.
Icy EyeG 29th August 2008, 20:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuyanxu
so they focus the SLi for high end users on cheaper CPU socket?

Wouldn't gamers prefer to spend their money on high-end graphics card(s) (single, SLI or CrossFire) than on a high-end CPU?

I'm pretty sure that Lynnfield and Havendale will preform well enough for most people (for both office work and games). All you're going to need is a decent GPU to go along with it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuyanxu
please someone explain to me how does the Nehalem line works? Bloomfield is high end socket 1336, Lynnfield and Havendale is midrange, socket 1100something) without IOH? (how can CPU have less pins while not having a IOH? )

Here you go: http://www.nehalemnews.com/2008/04/nehalem-faq.html ;)

I must say I'm curious to know if NVIDIA will implement Hybrid SLI on Havendale CPUs (since they have integrated graphics on-dye). Has the cross-licensing agreement gone that far?
One could speculate that an alternative to implement Hybrid SLI would be integration of a GPU on the nForce 200... but that's just me speculating. :o

And about the QPI license, we shouldn't forget about the server/workstation market. nForce Professional for Nehalem (Beckton or Gainestown), anyone? :)
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