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Intel announces mobile quad-core processors

Intel announces mobile quad-core processors

Dadi Perlmutter announces imminent availability of mobile quad-core processors based on the Penryn architecture.

Dadi Perlmutter, Executive Vice President and General Manager of Intel’s Mobility Group, announced that Intel has launched its first mobile quad-core processors based on the company’s 45nm Penryn architecture during his keynote.

The first processors will be the Core 2 Extreme QX9300 and Core 2 Quad Q9100 and will come clocked at 2.53GHz and 2.26GHz respectively. Both feature a 1,066MHz front side bus and 12MB of L2 cache.

TDPs haven’t been discussed openly, but we’ve heard whispers in the region of 55W – one thing’s for sure, you won’t be seeing these processors in anything but desktop replacements.

We’ve seen a couple of machines with mobile quad-core processors dotted around the Moscone, but none seem to be using processors clocked at the launch speeds. One was an Asus model with a 15.1in form factor, which looks like it’ll fit under the Republic of Gamers brand.

The other was a 17in ODM model from Flextronics, which featured a mobile Core 2 Quad processor rated at 2.4GHz, but running at almost 3.0GHz. In addition, the machine also included a pair of Mobility Radeon HD 3870s in CrossFire for good measure.

Intel announces mobile quad-core processors Intel announces mobile quad-core processors Intel announces mobile quad-core processors
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Opinion on gaming notebooks in general is divided, but these two machines look like they might satisfy that niche of performance-craving mobile gamers and multimedia enthusiasts. I’m not entirely convinced by this whole overclocked gaming notebook market though – overclocking notebooks just doesn’t seem right.

That concern was amplified when I saw a mobile dual-core desktop replacement notebook running at an impressive 4.0GHz. In order to reach these speeds though, the notebook had to be cooled by a thermoelectrically chilled notebook cooler. Without that, you’d be limited to a 3.5GHz clock speed “before things get a little unstable,” said one Intel representative.

Intel announces mobile quad-core processors Intel announces mobile quad-core processors Intel announces mobile quad-core processors
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Moving back to the quad-core processors being announced though, I see them having a bigger impact in the mobile workstation market – a market where overclocking isn’t even a consideration. We look forward to having a look at some of the notebooks once they’re available – they won’t be the first though, because Kobalt has already shoehorned a desktop quad-core processor into a ‘notebook’ with the Comanche SLI.

What do you think about quad-core making a move into the notebook arena? Discuss in the forums.

7 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Tyrmot 20th August 2008, 18:01 Quote
Even a big ol' gaming laptop is still a hell of a lot more portable than a full size ATX gaming case plus a 22"-30" screen...

The battery is pointless, why do they even bother with them still? Who uses one of these without plugging it in? They should ditch the battery and stick in extra cooling or something....
Jojii 20th August 2008, 18:50 Quote
You can cook your jewels even faster!
Arkanrais 20th August 2008, 21:12 Quote
why isn't overclocking even an option for the mobile workstation?
is it cause of battery life?
chrisb2e9 20th August 2008, 21:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tile
The bottom of the laptop can be made into a huge radiator.

I'd like to have kids someday though...
D B 21st August 2008, 00:02 Quote
A laptop is best as a small and light portable computer .. you can get them that way now and there is many to choose from
A laptop is best as a portable version of a desktop rig .. you can get them that way too

Improving one leads to improvements that can be used in the other, cooling, procesors, power requirments, batteries .. I think there's room for both camps
Timmy_the_tortoise 21st August 2008, 08:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkanrais
why isn't overclocking even an option for the mobile workstation?
is it cause of battery life?

Mainly because of cooling, I believe.. Understandably, Notebooks don't get a lot of airflow.
reflux 21st August 2008, 10:20 Quote
Having had a £2000 Dell XPS gaming laptop a few years ago, and then moving to my first custom built PC, I can confidently say that uber powerful laptops are a total waste of money. You're better off spending the £2k on a decent desktop and the rest on a 15.4'' laptop with reasonable power.
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