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Cyberlink has PowerCinema for Eee PC and Edge TV

Cyberlink has PowerCinema for Eee PC and Edge TV

Cyberlink's DVB-T TV over a mobile Edge connection.

Considering the mainstream appeal of the Eee PC, having the familiar interface of PowerCinema (and other media playing/browsing clones) is a step in a logical direction for those venturing into variants of Linux.

It is simply a port of its Windows software, however Cyberlink showed us this morning its new software will even run on a standard seven-inch Eee PC 701.

It has the usual video, music and photo support although the playback speed is limited to the processor inside and if you want to use a USB DVD drive, there’s even a DVD add-on available. However, how long that four-cell battery will last is anyone’s guess.

In slightly related Cyberlink news, the company also showed us an HSDPA-based DVB-T device that allows you to stream TV over a mobile Edge connection.

If you’re like us and out a lot, an HSDPA dongle is pretty much invaluable when it comes to doing work on the move. Some telecoms companies like TIM in Italy are also bundling in DVB-T digital TV over Edge networks as a value-add, so while you’re out on the train travelling to Rome, drinking your Cappuccino, you can still catch some TV if you’re bored with answering emails.

Cyberlink has PowerCinema for Eee PC and Edge TV  PowerCinema for the Eee and TV over EdgeCyberlink even includes access to premium channels too (providing you pay) so it’s not just limited to the usual free-to-air stuff. Unfortunately, if you’re out the country you can’t just call home to watch TV though – so even if my ISP (and the UK) did offer it, there’s no chance of me picking up next weekend’s Formula One on ITV.

OK, so the UK is still missing this feature, but you can still use that HSDPA dongle to access Cyberlink Live’s new Premium service (at $4 a month) to call home and access your home network – video, photos, PS3, NAS boxes, TV cards, webcams – the lot, as long as it’s DLNA 1.0/1.5 certified.

The premium service gives extra access to improved quality options and a recording options/EPG guide for TV. Again, it’s limited by your connection speed, but it does provide a large variety of options and a simple, smart interface - all you need is an internet browser that's flash capable. You also need to make sure your equipment is left on at home, or at least features a wake up function so you can turn it on - there's no online storage facility.

Fancy watching movies on your Eee, or is this kind of TV on the go the right usage model? Share your thoughts in the forums.

1 Comment

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Saivert 17th June 2008, 23:33 Quote
I just thought I write a comment so this news item isn't completely ignored.

This is good isn't it? Now people can play Blu-ray disc on Linux. Or can they?
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