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Cooler Master debuts ESA Cosmos

Cooler Master debuts ESA Cosmos

The ESA LED indicator is the only cosmetic change to Cosmos ESA from the original.

Cooler Master's Cosmos case is one sexy beast. With six hard drive bays and ample room inside, it originally came fairly feature packed for a case. Now there is one more feature to add to the list - the newest model supports Nvidia's Enthusiast System Architecture (ESA).

What exactly is ESA? ESA is an open source platform that calls for all computers devices to communicate with each other through the USB interface. Each device will be software controlled in order to allow you to view and change settings individually. While some components have offered this option for some time now, it is now being standardised and backed up by the likes of Nvidia and a large list of manufacturers.

Cooler Master is among the many that are supporting the standard and today brings forth the debut of the Cosmos ESA.

While nearly identical to the Cosmos case that we reviewed back in August, there are a couple of slight changes to this new version. The biggest of them all is a thermal control board which gives the users the ability to monitor and adjust four separate fans. While this may not seem like much to those that have used a fanbus for years, it does allow all of this to happen through a software link.

Future power supplies and water cooling products from Cooler Master will also support ESA. ESA power supplies will allow users to monitor and adjust voltages, currents, and temperatures while ESA water cooling units will allow users to monitor flow rates, control pumps, fans, and water temperatures.

List price for the Cosmos ESA is currently $229 USD.

Are you interested in upgrading your components to ESA supported ones? Maybe the sight and sound check is enough for you. Leave your thoughts over in the forums.

11 Comments

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Cupboard 13th November 2007, 17:09 Quote
I forget if the fans are power by USB as well as controlled by it. If so, that would be quite cool (sorry). It definitely beat running 3 fans of one motherboard header

Nowhere seems to sell it though, do you know how much more it is that the usual one? $229 is cheaper than £140 in the original article, but that is in the US
Risky 13th November 2007, 21:24 Quote
Still the weakness of this is that is will relay on the OS, so in the event of a crash you lose all control. Now a software controllable system outside the primary system is what you really need e.g. something grown out of the t-balancer concept.
DXR_13KE 13th November 2007, 22:09 Quote
the ideal would be a second, behind the scenes OS, like some flavor of linux, running on the background out of your way...... and i very much doubt the fans would be powered by USB.....
Cupboard 13th November 2007, 22:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DXR_13KE
and i very much doubt the fans would be powered by USB.....
no reasons I can think of why not. If you can power a hard drive/light/fan/drinks cooler from one, why not a couple of case fans?
I don't really know though (hence the question)
completemadness 13th November 2007, 22:51 Quote
A 80mm case fan is usually about 0.1A (in my experience) - maybe more depending on size/speed, However, that's at 12v

Don't forget, USB is 100mA max (non negotiated) or 500mA (negotiated) but that's at 5v
DXR_13KE 13th November 2007, 23:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by completemadness
A 80mm case fan is usually about 0.1A (in my experience) - maybe more depending on size/speed, However, that's at 12v

Don't forget, USB is 100mA max (non negotiated) or 500mA (negotiated) but that's at 5v

exactly what i was thinking...

maybe it is powered by the psu, but has a usb connection for speed control and noise control.
completemadness 14th November 2007, 01:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DXR_13KE
maybe it is powered by the psu, but has a usb connection for speed control and noise control.
I would be very surprised if it wasn't done that way :)
Anakha 14th November 2007, 03:31 Quote
I think a board like that would operate so when there isn't a negotiated connection with some controlling software, the fans run at 100% (Or use an onboard thermistor, or have some other setting stored in a tiny CMOS chip so you can control how the system starts/runs). That would be the sensible way to do things.
Woodstock 14th November 2007, 04:12 Quote
i think that bit needs to get one as a follow up to the esa article
HourBeforeDawn 14th November 2007, 08:42 Quote
wait Im confused dont most motherboard already have the ability to control fans? or at least CPU/SYS/Chassis fans for one and then you can get USB Fan controllers already that can do the same thing so whats the point? If someone could explain a little more that would be great.
HourBeforeDawn 14th November 2007, 08:51 Quote
oh there was rumor that CM was going to release an all aluminum version of the cosmos around Dec/Jan, could that also be whats different with the ESA Cosmos? as that was the case I was holding out for. ^_^
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