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PC Power & Cooling launches new 1.2kW PSU

PC Power & Cooling launches new 1.2kW PSU

The Turbo-Cool 1200 will use PC Power & Cooling's massive single +12VDC rail that is rated for 90A.

If you're shopping for a power supply that will make your electric bill cry while still being rock-solid reliable, then PC Power & Cooling has you covered with its new Nvidia SLI Certified Turbo-Cool 1200 PSU. Yep, that's right - 1200 Watts.

The new Turbo-Cool 1200 features a continuous 1.2kW output with a 1.3kW peak, 90A single +12VDC rail, 83 percent efficiency rating, six PCI-E connections, 15 drive connections (6 SATA, 8 Molex, 1 mini), and 24-pin, dual 8-pin, and 4-pin motherboard connections. It also comes with a 14-point certified test report and a 7-year warranty.

One of the biggest reasons that people turn to PC Power & Cooling PSUs is because they are renowned for their stable rails. Richard had some difficulties in maintaining a stable rail in his benchmarks of the PC Power & Cooling Silencer 750W CrossFire and Quad PSUs just a couple of weeks ago, but hopefully the issue won't rear its ugly head in the Turbo-Cool 1200.

Some might call this absolute overkill, but for those that actually have rigs that draw massive amount of power then this could be just what the doctor ordered. However, if you're needing a high wattage PSU and want it to be modular, you're going to have to look elsewhere. PCPC has stuck to its guns about not offering a modular PSU.

The Turbo-Cool 1200 will set you back $499.99 in the US, electric power plant sold separately.

Are you one of those who needs a monster of a PSU for your rig? Need some extra room in your wallet? Let us know if you'd like to pick one of these bad boys up by telling us in the forums.

24 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Mankz 4th October 2007, 14:57 Quote
As if a 1-KW SR wasn't enough anyway...:'(
Mother-Goose 4th October 2007, 15:01 Quote
Ya know,they really should cap psu's in same way they are (trying to) cap emmissions.

They should say that 650watts is the maximum allowed and then the hardware manufactuer's (I'm looking at you nVidia and AMD (ATi) yes, YOU!) will be forced to get the performance on and have decent power usage.
TheCherub 4th October 2007, 15:08 Quote
The lack of the modular facility is a little annoying, especially when you bear in mind the enormous number of cables that come with this power supply.

Is there any reason (from an electrical point of view) why they have chosen not to make modular power supplies? Given that it is a company with such a reputation, I would expect there to be a reason for it.
mclean007 4th October 2007, 15:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCherub
The lack of the modular facility is a little annoying, especially when you bear in mind the enormous number of cables that come with this power supply.

Is there any reason (from an electrical point of view) why they have chosen not to make modular power supplies? Given that it is a company with such a reputation, I would expect there to be a reason for it.
Theoretically, every connection adds impedance and a potential point of failure, but these are pretty negligible and are IMHO far outweighed by the benefits of a modular PSU. Perhaps there is an issue with physical space inside the PSU given the heavy duty componentry (not to mention cooling) needed to service 1.2kW??
Cupboard 4th October 2007, 16:14 Quote
Is there a significance in there only being one rail?
ỒĊBłůē 4th October 2007, 16:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupboard
Is there a significance in there only being one rail?
I noticed that - the 1kW version appears to be single rail flavour too.

Their reasoning is explained here (#8).

They've answered the modular plugs one there too, though I'd suggest that if they used better quality (industry standard) plug & sockets there would be less of a problem.
naokaji 4th October 2007, 16:32 Quote
the point behind sinlge rail is that the multi rail psu's are limited for how much they can put out per rail, also you cant screw up by demanding too much of one rail while leaving the others "alone" when there is only one rail.
Awoken 4th October 2007, 16:39 Quote
Can a households electricity supply support this under 75-85% load in addition to all the other modern appliances and chargers?
Risky 4th October 2007, 17:03 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awoken
Can a households electricity supply support this under 75-85% load in addition to all the other modern appliances and chargers?

A kettle might be about 3000W. You don't need the 3-phase power supply yet.
HandMadeAndroid 4th October 2007, 17:24 Quote
yeah **** the environment, pass me an uber cola and some sun screen
devdevil85 4th October 2007, 21:51 Quote
I thought 1000W was ridiculous.....
DXR_13KE 4th October 2007, 22:02 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mother-Goose
Ya know,they really should cap psu's in same way they are (trying to) cap emmissions.

They should say that 650watts is the maximum allowed and then the hardware manufactuer's (I'm looking at you nVidia and AMD (ATi) yes, YOU!) will be forced to get the performance on and have decent power usage.

i am with him!!! :(
Zurechial 5th October 2007, 01:31 Quote
Oh joy, another defeat for common sense.
Yet another overpowered toy for those with more money than sense and more insecurities than an enlarged e-penis can cure..
completemadness 5th October 2007, 01:35 Quote
Quote:
six PCI-E connections, 15 drive connections (6 SATA, 8 Molex, 1 mini), and 24-pin, dual 8-pin, and 4-pin motherboard connections
Why on earth do you need 6 PCI-E connections (SLI only needs 4 ... and its not enough for quad SLI)
Why dual 8 pins as well, motherboards only have 1, and why the 4 pin on top of that, just give a 8->4 adaptor for those that need it

Jeez if they put a second 24pin in there you could run 2 computers (and then some) on this power supply
Quote:
Originally Posted by ỒĊBłůē
I noticed that - the 1kW version appears to be single rail flavour too.

Their reasoning is explained here (#8).

They've answered the modular plugs one there too, though I'd suggest that if they used better quality (industry standard) plug & sockets there would be less of a problem.
Im not too sure on some of them (#3, 4, 5, 6)
Fod 5th October 2007, 08:33 Quote
Quote:
but for those that actually have rigs that draw massive amount of power then this could be just what the doctor ordered.

....and, pray tell, who are these mythical, elusive people with such rigs as to draw legendary amounts of POWAH?
naokaji 5th October 2007, 10:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fod
....and, pray tell, who are these mythical, elusive people with such rigs as to draw legendary amounts of POWAH?

2x Quad Core Xeon + SLI with highend Nvidia Quadro Cards + 16 GB FB DIMM Ram + Raid 60 Array with 8+ 15 K HDD.... thats about as close to such amounts of power as you can get...

no i dont have one:( (but if someone wants to donate one just drop me a pm)
[USRF]Obiwan 5th October 2007, 10:38 Quote
very environment friendly indeed. They / we should:

swap harddrives for solidstate (harddrive manufactures should start making deals with memorychip makers as soon as possible)
swap 65nm CPU for 45nm CPU (or lower nm) as soon as possible
swap 65GPU for r45nm GPU (or lower nm) as soon as possible
make better/efficient motherboars as soon as possible
make better/efficient videocards as soon as possible
make better/efficient PSUs as soon as possible (instead of the "more watt is better war" invent the "less watt is ownage war" )
swap all crt monitors for energy efficient lcd monitors (with same qualities)

All the above will have a real effect on the worlds powerdrain.
p3n 5th October 2007, 10:44 Quote
As stated on the PCPC site a PSU doesnt actually use more power unless you plug more into it, and a high power psu at lower usage will usually be more efficient.

Im sure people could use a good 600w on hard drive arrays and such, less enthusiasts bashing kit thats made for them tbh!
Kipman725 5th October 2007, 10:56 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mclean007
Theoretically, every connection adds impedance and a potential point of failure, but these are pretty negligible and are IMHO far outweighed by the benefits of a modular PSU. Perhaps there is an issue with physical space inside the PSU given the heavy duty componentry (not to mention cooling) needed to service 1.2kW??

Every connection has resistance and even if it's only a fraction of an Ohm that means alot when your drawing large currents through it. For example if we have a connection with a impedance of 0.02ohm and draw 30A through it P=I^2 * R states we have a connector disapating 18W! enough to damage the connector. Another problem is that the impedance of the connectors will cause increased load modulation of the voltage components recive by increasing the output impedance of the power supply. For example with our same example asuming a supply voltage of 12V the load will only be reciving 11.4V which puts the supply out of the ATX spec (not that PCPC psus conform to this anyway... but thats another issue (and one that I agree that they should take the stance they take due to the specs been geared towrads cheaper psus)).

:)
Fod 5th October 2007, 16:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by naokaji
2x Quad Core Xeon + SLI with highend Nvidia Quadro Cards + 16 GB FB DIMM Ram + Raid 60 Array with 8+ 15 K HDD.... thats about as close to such amounts of power as you can get...

no i dont have one:( (but if someone wants to donate one just drop me a pm)

yes but that would most likely take a non commodity PSU considering the type of system - not a gamer-oriented PSU that complete retards with "omg i have two HDDs it must use a lot of powah" are going to buy.
completemadness 8th October 2007, 01:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by p3n
As stated on the PCPC site a PSU doesnt actually use more power unless you plug more into it, and a high power psu at lower usage will usually be more efficient.
PSU's are most efficient around 2/3 load
CUSTOM COMPUTERS 14th October 2007, 01:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mankz.
As if a 1-KW SR wasn't enough anyway...:'(

If you are interested in trying out the latest in tech.- the L1n64-Sli motherboard with true Quad Sli running 4-8800's then yes you are going to need all the power you can get your hands on. along with those 8 pcie connections. We have built and succeeded in this and can tell you you need power and lots of it.

Thanks
CUSTOM COMPUTERS 14th October 2007, 01:50 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupboard
Is there a significance in there only being one rail?

these power supplys have 1-150amp rail thats pretty impresive in our book
Thanks
cpemma 14th October 2007, 18:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ỒĊBłůē
I noticed that - the 1kW version appears to be single rail flavour too.

Their reasoning is explained here (#8).
Quote:
For example, if the 12-volt rail that powers the CPU is rated for 17 amps and the CPU only uses 7A, the remaining 10A is unusable, since it is isolated from the rest of the system.
However,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardware Secrets
What immediately caught our eye were the four separated +12 V lines listed on the label (see Figure 15). As it happens to all high-power units nowadays, OCZ uses a “virtual rail” concept, where they label their power supplies as having separated +12 V rails but inside the unit they are all connected together to a single +12 V rail on the power supply printed circuit board. Unfortunately all manufacturers seem to be doing like this to match the ATX12V 2.x and EPS12V specifications, which require the power supply to have separated +12V rails.
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