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AMD unveils G3MX technology

AMD unveils G3MX technology

AMD's next server socket after the current Socket F will be Socket G3... expect it, and processors supporting G3MX technology, in 2009.

During a briefing with company officials yesterday, AMD announced that it has developed a new memory technology called G3 Memory Extender (G3MX) that allows for higher memory capacities in Opteron-based machines.

G3MX will use standard JEDEC certified DDR3 memory modules, meaning that it’s possible to create a cost-effective machine with lots of memory and a reasonable power budget.

I’m sure many of you are wondering why “cost-effective” and “DDR3” are in the same sentence because, right now, DDR3 is exceedingly expensive. Worry not though, as by the time this technology is introduced, DDR3’s pricing will be more sensible – it will be implemented into future Opteron processors released sometime in 2009.

Socket F will be the socket that AMD’s Opteron processors use until after the company’s 45nm Shanghai processor makes its debut in mid-2008. After Shanghai, AMD’s Opteron processors released in 2009 will use socket G3 – this, not surprisingly, is where G3MX gets its name.

G3MX will double the amount of memory channels from two to four, meaning that it’s possible for processors featuring G3MX to address up to 16 DIMMs instead of the current maximum of eight. One thing that AMD hasn’t revealed at the moment is whether G3MX will require registered ECC or standard desktop DDR3 memory modules.

AMD’s intention is for the technology to be an alternative to FBDIMMs, which tend to be power hungry and certainly aren’t cheap – it’s also questionable whether they will ever get “cheap” in the future, too. DDR3, on the other hand, has the potential to get cheaper when volume increases and power consumption is also appreciably lower too.

It’s not clear whether this technology will make its way onto the desktop in a similar time frame, but given that the amount of memory we’re talking about here it’s unlikely to be required for some time.

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14 Comments

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Krikkit 26th July 2007, 17:38 Quote
That sounds like interesting stuff, although I'm not sure it affects mere desktop users like ourselves - I think I can cope with 8 DIMM's-worth. :)
leviathan18 26th July 2007, 18:03 Quote
what we need is barcelona
Amon 26th July 2007, 18:11 Quote
There have been about 9 new sockets from AMD in the past year. Anyone else annoyed by this?
devdevil85 26th July 2007, 18:54 Quote
/\ I"m annoyed Phenom hasn't debuted....man do I want to see what that little piece of 45nm silicon can do....
Amon 26th July 2007, 19:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by devdevil85
/\ I"m annoyed Phenom hasn't debuted....man do I want to see what that little piece of 45nm silicon can do....
I certainly agree, but I find that AMD is striking the nails into its own crucifix when they are creating a massive compatibility disparity from so many different sockets for such negligible improvements. What the hell are they thinking?!
Tim S 26th July 2007, 19:42 Quote
Phenom is 65nm :)
devdevil85 26th July 2007, 22:51 Quote
I thought 45nm in 2008? That's what I'm waiting for....
Tim S 26th July 2007, 23:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by devdevil85
I thought 45nm in 2008? That's what I'm waiting for....

Yep, that's Shanghai (at least that's what the server part is codenamed) - mid-08, apparently. :)
devdevil85 26th July 2007, 23:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim S
Yep, that's Shanghai (at least that's what the server part is codenamed) - mid-08, apparently. :)
OMG I'm getting lost in translation....too many codenames....either way I'm waiting for a 45nm AMD CPU.....
Bladestorm 27th July 2007, 00:30 Quote
Sounds nice for companies - able to fit in more memory that potentially costs a lot less and uses less power ?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amon
There have been about 9 new sockets from AMD in the past year. Anyone else annoyed by this?

Wasn't AM2 released more than a year ago ? which leaves AM2+ and the (forthcoming?) AM3 in the desktop market and aren't they all backwards/forwards compatible anyway ?

I doubt corporations will be too bothered by more slot changes in the server market - they'll just build new servers with whatever is the best setup for them at the time anyway.
Amon 27th July 2007, 02:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bladestorm
Sounds nice for companies - able to fit in more memory that potentially costs a lot less and uses less power ?



Wasn't AM2 released more than a year ago ? which leaves AM2+ and the (forthcoming?) AM3 in the desktop market and aren't they all backwards/forwards compatible anyway ?

I doubt corporations will be too bothered by more slot changes in the server market - they'll just build new servers with whatever is the best setup for them at the time anyway.

Scalability will be a bit of a problem for there will be a remarkably thin array of configuration options with so many sockets. And we already know that many enterprise solution providers always incorporate some form of a proprietary measure in their products, making solutions from other providers incompatible with each other. I'm pretty sure there are at least another three sockets (I think they were just called M- or S-sockets, or whatever) later this year, plus AM2+ and AM3, and then we've got Socket F and the soon-to-be F+.
kosch 27th July 2007, 10:22 Quote
Sounds like it could be a nice added extra to the virtualization market. AMD has always had the upper hand in terms of memory management when using ESX.
naokaji 27th July 2007, 11:36 Quote
well... just had to comment on the not another bunch of sockets stuff....

atleast amd releases new sockets.... intel requires you to buy new mainboards with the same socket....

or do you think you can run a QX6850 in every mainboard with socket 775? with different sockets its far easier for the end user to tell what mainboard is compatible with what cpu.
[USRF]Obiwan 27th July 2007, 12:05 Quote
All the socket changes are a combined marketing (proffits) for both processor, motherboard and memory makers. (and maybe some new fancy graphic slot to add gpu makers) If they would build everything for the same sockets/slots/etc. Nobody would buy new memory, motherboard and processors anymore.
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