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NVIDIA to release new 680i LT chipset

NVIDIA to release new 680i LT chipset

Nula, like the rest of us, likes a bargain!

NVIDIA is set to release a new budget 680i SLI chipset with cut down features branded the 680i LT SLI. It still offers the majority of the 680i SLI features including dual PCI-Express x16 SLI and links to what seems to be a restricted MCP55 southbridge: only supporting a single Gigabit Ethernet and eight USB 2.0 ports.

The memory support is also restricted to DDR2-800, rather than DDR2-1200, although front side bus (FSB) support for future 1333MHz Intel CPUs remains intact.

Considering the success for many in overclocking of the 650i and with regards to the recent Asus P5N32-E SLI Plus review we published recently which pairs the ever capable 650i northbridge and connectivity filled MCP55 southbridge for a reasonable price, it brings into question what possible benefit this could bring to the consumer. It will give more choice from more NVIDIA partners, and the motherboard should still have six SATA ports over that of the 650i/430-southbrige's four.

If the memory bus support has been limited or if NVIDIA is clearing some inventory and these are working but "inferior" chipsets, in that they won't overclock like you expect a normal 680i northbrige to, then this might not be an enthusiast product worth considering.

However, we will have to reserve judgement until we see the final retail boards and their prices. It might become a fantastic bargain for those who don't need oodles of USB and networking, but have predominantly SATA and SLI systems.

5 Comments

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Cthippo 9th February 2007, 18:10 Quote
Does the chipset really contribute that much to the cost of the board? Even assuming it does, few mobos approach the cost of even one decent video card, much less two for SLI. Seems like a strange place to try to sell a budget part.
Bluephoenix 9th February 2007, 20:54 Quote
Most won't buy it due to the loss of the USB ports.

With no room available these days for a PCI USB Expander card, A lot of consumers rely heavily on the included motherboard USB ports.

only a gamer looking to build a powerful LAN machine would even consider buying one. (if they could find a case that doesn't weigh as much as an M1A2 tank from all the cooling required)

And I second the comment about the motherboard-as-budget part. The motherboard is often the only place in a system where compromise is not an option because it regulates a system's future ability to upgrade.
Kipman725 10th February 2007, 13:13 Quote
meh artificial product differantiation through "SLI", all mobo's with 2xPCIE 8x or 6x could support it if the nvidia drivers allowed it.
Bindibadgi 11th February 2007, 16:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cthippo
Does the chipset really contribute that much to the cost of the board? Even assuming it does, few mobos approach the cost of even one decent video card, much less two for SLI. Seems like a strange place to try to sell a budget part.

I still reckon it's a "clearing inventory" part that they will shift quite cheaply. Chipsets generally cost 1/4 to 1/3rd of the board, depending on what you buy, how many, your relationship with vendor etc
masteroffm 12th February 2007, 21:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cthippo
Does the chipset really contribute that much to the cost of the board?

actually yes. the chipset is the most expensive single part of a motherboard. IIRC the northbridge chip for a 925 motherboard was somewhere in the range of US$50, and the ICH6R was something like US$35 on a motherboard that ran US$220

edit: link with pricing on the nforce4 chipset

http://theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=27553
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