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ATI snaffles Macci

ATI snaffles Macci

Macci works on an ATI rig (image courtesy Anandtech).

One of the world's top overclockers, Macci, has joined ATI and is now working as a consultant at the firm's headquarters in Canada, the graphics firm has told bit-tech today.

Macci is well known in the overclocking community for his outrageous OCing exploits, usually involving liquid nitrogen and some awesome soldering skills. His previous interaction with ATI has included an overclocking competition at the Texas Gaming Festival, where he went to work on the (then unannounced) 512MB Radeon cards.

Macci has joined the motherboard department at ATI, and is working to make its next generation of motherboard chipsets, codenamed RD580, insanely overclockable.

We wonder if ATI will be attempting to leverage some marketing spin from 'Macci Edition' motherboards, just as various companies employ the 'Fatal1ty' brand now?

Meanwhile, Macci's new compadre in the firm, Reuven Soraya, has been answering questions about the firm's motherboard strategy for 2006, starting with RD580, which he confirmed will be out early in the year.

Soraya refuted claims that Nvidia has added "pioneering" new features to mainboards, but confirmed that ATI has plans of its own to add to the desktop featureset, saying that "It's important to emphasize that some of the features [Nvidia have added] provide no benefit to the customer and, in some cases, have caused prolems...[but] as we enter the high-end channel and distribution side of the market... you will definitely see new technologies from ATI."

On the topic of the less-than-optimal-performing SB450 southbridge (which has rather a gammy implementation of USB), Soraya says that "Although the USB throughput is not at the maximum theoretical, as measured by some benchmarks, it poses no problem to the majority of the users; in other words the lack of the maximum USB throughput is not noticeable in the majority of user scenarios. " Well, we'd argue otherwise, but useful to get some clarification.

Finally, thinking forward to Media Center 2006 and Windows Vista, Soraya said that ATI's next integrated graphics chipset design will take performance "A step further" from the current level, adding that their current integrated graphics design was a "Solid foundation" for Media Center based systems.

Would you buy an ATI board that was engineered and endorsed by Macci? Give us your thoughts in the forum.