bit-gamer.net

Sims 4 pirates attacked by pixels

Sims 4 pirates attacked by pixels

The blurry pixels start by covering a naked sim as expected, but then spread to the whole screen.

An anti-piracy trap has been discovered in The Sims 4 where the screen slowly pixelates and blurs itself out.

The intentional glitch happens when sims remove their clothes which blurs and censors the character. They then stay this way when the clothes go back on and the pixelated cloud then expands to the whole screen.

The official Sims 4 forums are currently receiving a lot of visitors looking for solutions to the bug, marking themselves out as having pirated the title. There is currently no patch for the piracy glitch other than buying a legitimate copy of the game.

The Sims 4 launched this week in several territories and launches today in the UK.

Game-breaking anti-piracy bugs are not uncommon and some studios have been known to get really creative with them. EA has dabbled with the tactic before, for example a subtle one in Mirror’s Edge where pirated copies would force the player to slow down before certain jumps that need a lot of speed.

Other examples include Batman: Arkham Asylum where the Dark Knight is unable to glide in pirated copies, putting an early halt to any progress pirates can make and a particularly brutal example with ARMA, which gradually degraded the game over time. This started with weapon accuracy becoming less and less effective and progressed to graphical reduction and finally culminated in turning the player’s character into a bird.

Possibly the most meta example of piracy glitches can be found in Game Dev Tycoon, where games the player releases fail financially because they are all pirated in-game.

27 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Panos 5th September 2014, 13:13 Quote
That's great. I do not see the issue, and feels less intrusive than standard drmware attached to the systems.
craigey1 5th September 2014, 13:54 Quote
I think it's a great. It provides people with an extended demo (which seem to be lacking) & if they want to continue they can do so by buying a full version of the game & actually contribute to the game studio/developers.
greypilgers 5th September 2014, 13:58 Quote
An imaginative way of combating a problem - I like it!
DriftCarl 5th September 2014, 16:20 Quote
I am all for this, finally game creators are doing something about it rather than whine about piracy and slap DRM on as their default anti-piracy action
jb0 5th September 2014, 16:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panos
That's great. I do not see the issue, and feels less intrusive than standard drmware attached to the systems.
Ah, but how does it detect if the game is pirated? That's what matters. It could still be an intrusive, offensive, and insecure heap of crap, just a FUNNY intrusive, offensive, insecure piece of crap.

I'd rather have a self-contained system that simply yells at you before it crashes to the desktop than a funny rootkit.
Spreadie 5th September 2014, 16:32 Quote
Games are so bloody cheap now, other than impatience, why bother with pirated games anymore? Sure it'll launch at full price, but it'll be half that or less at the next steam/origin/GMG/whatever sale.
Margo Baggins 5th September 2014, 16:58 Quote
People still pirate games?!
loftie 5th September 2014, 17:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margo Baggins
People still pirate games?!

*Looks back at BF4, SimCity + SimCity Cities of Tomorrow, Dead Space*

I don't blame 'em.
Margo Baggins 5th September 2014, 17:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by loftie
*Looks back at BF4, SimCity + SimCity Cities of Tomorrow, Dead Space*

I don't blame 'em.

I have all those games though, mostly by accident! I own them all legitimate - but i've never played them. It's so much easier to not pirate games these days, get updates, play online. etc.
loftie 5th September 2014, 18:49 Quote
I agree although considering the BF4 release troubles and the SimCity troubles I'm not surprised to see people pirating a game on release to see if the thing works/is what it claims to be. And we know EA aren't the only ones doing it.
SexyHyde 6th September 2014, 01:01 Quote
Are we sure this isn't just a "minecraft" mode?

I did pirate one game fairly recently to see whether I was prepared to drop £40 on it after a few questionable games from the distributor, but other than that it had been 6 years since I pirated anything. I will and do pay for anything I use and these glitches seem perfect as long as they give people a decent demo of the game.
XXAOSICXX 6th September 2014, 09:43 Quote
What happened to reading some reviews and looking at the user comments on Steam/metacritic to weigh up whether or not to buy the game? This whole "I pirate it to try before I buy" argument really is pretty weak these days.

It's not like you're _ever_ buying blind nowadays either...unless you're buying day one...but even then, what game is SO important to a persons life that they can't just wait a few days to see what the gaming community makes of the game.
siliconfanatic 6th September 2014, 16:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by XXAOSICXX
What happened to reading some reviews and looking at the user comments on Steam/metacritic to weigh up whether or not to buy the game? This whole "I pirate it to try before I buy" argument really is pretty weak these days.

It's not like you're _ever_ buying blind nowadays either...unless you're buying day one...but even then, what game is SO important to a persons life that they can't just wait a few days to see what the gaming community makes of the game.
I'll take your argument against this argument, and raise you one Arkham Knight :p

On a more serious level, this is correct. Just wait 2-3 or 4-5 days and you've got plenty of reviews at your disposal, provided your google-fu is up to par ;). Another month and you got a massive steam sale that'll knock the price down any wheres from 50-90%.

On the other hand you gotta be careful, steam sales rape your wallet before you can file for bankruptcy.
SexyHyde 6th September 2014, 21:48 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by XXAOSICXX
What happened to reading some reviews and looking at the user comments on Steam/metacritic to weigh up whether or not to buy the game? This whole "I pirate it to try before I buy" argument really is pretty weak these days.

It's not like you're _ever_ buying blind nowadays either...unless you're buying day one...but even then, what game is SO important to a persons life that they can't just wait a few days to see what the gaming community makes of the game.

Which was my exact view. BUT companies buying reviews, biased reviewers, customer campaigns, features changed or removed, misleading video pre-release, reviews from outlets that don't know but want clicks and on and on. Before it was a case of finding a reviewer, normally with similar tastes and opinions but there are so many things to take into account. I paid out for games I just haven't played and have no way of selling my games on. If there is any reasonable doubt a little pirate to test isn't bad as long as you do pay for what you use.

In no way do I condone pure pirating. I could easily pirate music, but pay for Deezer and sometimes even a CD. Movies are Netflix (and VPN/DNS), Play and a trip to the movies now and again. Games are Steam and HumbleBundle.
Fantus 6th September 2014, 21:56 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by XXAOSICXX
What happened to reading some reviews and looking at the user comments on Steam/metacritic to weigh up whether or not to buy the game? This whole "I pirate it to try before I buy" argument really is pretty weak these days.

It's not like you're _ever_ buying blind nowadays either...unless you're buying day one...but even then, what game is SO important to a persons life that they can't just wait a few days to see what the gaming community makes of the game.

Alternatively, find someone streaming it on Twitch.
loftie 7th September 2014, 01:01 Quote
I miss demos.
XXAOSICXX 7th September 2014, 09:56 Quote
The user reviews on Steam (if you're buying on Steam, of course) are probably the best source of intel on a given game....doesn't take long for a few dozen/hundred/thousand reviews to come in...and generally speaking, they're bang on the money.

If you're not sure about a game...just don't buy it! It's only a game lol...your life will continue without it :P
jimmyjj 7th September 2014, 12:02 Quote
Surely EA should pay YOU to play the Sims?
loftie 7th September 2014, 12:20 Quote
Reviews will not tell you how a game runs on your system, BF4 comes to mind.
Quote:
If you're not sure about a game...just don't buy it! It's only a game lol...your life will continue without it :P

While I understand what you mean, do I just stop doing everything that I'm unsure about? :p
XXAOSICXX 7th September 2014, 14:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by loftie
Reviews will not tell you how a game runs on your system, BF4 comes to mind.
Quote:
If you're not sure about a game...just don't buy it! It's only a game lol...your life will continue without it :P

While I understand what you mean, do I just stop doing everything that I'm unsure about? :p

If it's illegal..yeah..you probably should, lol :p
loftie 7th September 2014, 16:34 Quote
Good thing we're now allowed to format shift music then, otherwise the entire country would be in jail! Well, maybe not anyone's gran :)

Edit: would what some of these game companies are doing also be classed as fraud? I'm thinking of the Aliens game, and I know EA/Dice is being taken to court over something.
SexyHyde 8th September 2014, 00:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by XXAOSICXX
If it's illegal..yeah..you probably should, lol :p

You're right, I have seen the error of my ways. It's not like any of these companies would do anything illegal like say, steal / use pantents and ip from each other, or poach employees to gain competitive knowledge, or misleadingly sell a product, or place root kits in their products without disclosing it, etc. I'm sure pirating a game to evaluate a product would cause a CEO to have to go on benefits.
XXAOSICXX 8th September 2014, 11:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SexyHyde
I'm sure pirating a game to evaluate a product would cause a CEO to have to go on benefits.

Perhaps not, but as someone who employs a number of game developers (including indie studio owners) I'm exposed to a bit more of the "sorry, but we've got to let you go" than most.
schmidtbag 8th September 2014, 18:47 Quote
Pretty interesting. I never heard about the Mirror's Edge "glitch" either - I find that kind of funny. What I want to know though is if the game knows its being pirated, why doesn't it just simply prevent you from playing it? If the answer is "because hackers will know how to force the game to keep playing" then how come they couldn't just do the same thing to stop this "glitch"?
SexyHyde 9th September 2014, 00:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by XXAOSICXX
Quote:
Originally Posted by SexyHyde
I'm sure pirating a game to evaluate a product would cause a CEO to have to go on benefits.

Perhaps not, but as someone who employs a number of game developers (including indie studio owners) I'm exposed to a bit more of the "sorry, but we've got to let you go" than most.

Like I said, If you are going to play it, then pay for it. Always support the things you like and want.

I wasn't a big indie game fan but I'm amassing a mighty collection of games and enjoying some of them way more than the main titles from the big developers. This comes down to almost all indie developers being honest with what they have and following their own vision. The big guys just seem keen to churn out copies and use marketing to convince people it's all amazingly new and unique.
schmidtbag 9th September 2014, 02:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SexyHyde
Like I said, If you are going to play it, then pay for it. Always support the things you like and want.
Not that I endorse piracy, but software is a very gray area when it comes to value. It is difficult to justify the price of something that you can theoretically produce an infinite amount of. There is more to value than just supply and demand, but when it comes to other services such as customer support, how often are companies like EA really there to help you? I've had more luck with open source projects and independent developers. So far only 1 indie developer never got back to a question I had.
Quote:
I wasn't a big indie game fan but I'm amassing a mighty collection of games and enjoying some of them way more than the main titles from the big developers. This comes down to almost all indie developers being honest with what they have and following their own vision. The big guys just seem keen to churn out copies and use marketing to convince people it's all amazingly new and unique.
Most of the AAA titles are released by American companies, and the US runs on capitalism. They release games that appeal to the masses, and therefore what brings in the most money. This does not require quality, quantity, or variety. Developers for these companies don't get creative ideas heard and a lot of them, while maybe skilled developers, don't have a hint of creativity in them.

If an indie game is to be successful, it needs to stand out. Indie games are a niche market but its growing because people are starving for something new. It's a shame indie movies aren't getting as much success - Hollywood movies are painfully boring these days.
Corky42 9th September 2014, 09:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by schmidtbag
Pretty interesting. I never heard about the Mirror's Edge "glitch" either - I find that kind of funny. What I want to know though is if the game knows its being pirated, why doesn't it just simply prevent you from playing it? If the answer is "because hackers will know how to force the game to keep playing" then how come they couldn't just do the same thing to stop this "glitch"?

Because preventing someone from playing is easy to detect and work around, it either runs or it doesn't.
Allowing the game to run but intentionally causing a problem with the way it plays is harder to detect, mainly because that would mean having to play test the game, possibly extensively.
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums