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Carmack joins Oculus Rift team

Carmack joins Oculus Rift team

John Carmack has long been a vocal supporter of the Oculus Rift.

Id Software luminary John Carmack has taken a full time chief technology officer position with Oculus VR, the hardware developer behind the Oculus Rift.

Over Twitter, Carmack explained his time was now divided between Oculus Rift, Id and rocket company Armadillo. Bethesda has stated that Carmack's technical leadership at Id will however be unaffected by the new job.

'The dream of VR has been simmering in the background for decades, but now, the people and technologies are finally aligning to allow it to reach the potential we imagined,' said Carmack. 'I'm extremely excited to make a mark in what I truly believe will be a transformative technology.'

Carmack will be based in Oculus VR's new office which is opening up in Dallas, Texas. The company is also looking for key hires to join the office and support Carmack.

The Id co-founder has been a vocal supporter of the virtual reality headset and Oculus VR also praised his support for open source software. The company credits Carmack's early experiments with its virtual reality hardware as helping to put the technology on the map.

'His technical genius and passion for solving hard problems makes him the ideal CTO,' said Oculus VR founder Palmer Lucky.

The Oculus Rift has been available for developers since March this year, although a commercial release date is yet to be established. The headset raised $2.4m through a round of crowd funding on Kickstarter, which fed into the total $16m the company raised through all channels to develop the technology.

The consumer version of the Oculus Rift is still being worked on and some of the kinks still need to be ironed out. The company aims to have improved head tracking, weapon tracking and a 1080p resolution ready for the consumer release.

8 Comments

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greigaitken 8th August 2013, 11:06 Quote
I await the ultimate 3d experience where each eye gets a 4k stream
runadumb 8th August 2013, 11:10 Quote
Yeah that'll be awesome...in 2030 when GPU's can run it.
Corky42 8th August 2013, 11:47 Quote
By that time we will just be plugging a wire into the back of our heads
edzieba 8th August 2013, 12:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by greigaitken
I await the ultimate 3d experience where each eye gets a 4k stream
HAH! 4K is nothing when it comes to trying to fool human visual acuity. Spread over even the Rift's 110°, that's only 1/2 a pixel per arcminute, which doesn't even beat regular acuity let alone hyperacuity, or some of the more esoteric tricks the human visual system pulls to beat a naive view of the eye's Nyquist limit. Check Capability of the Human Visual System for a good intro. From the summary, you need 1 pixel per 0.5 arcseconds in good lighting to be truly imperceptible compared to reality. Over even the Rift's 110°, that's horizontally 792000 pixels.

And worse, you need to get the framerate up to way above 60fps to prevent a plethora of artifacts when moving your eyes or head, though ligthboost-style backlight flashing mitigates this somewhat, though resulting in some less offensive artifacts of it's own. See Abrash's blog (and his previous few posts) for details.
bbshammo 8th August 2013, 13:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by edzieba
Quote:
Originally Posted by greigaitken
I await the ultimate 3d experience where each eye gets a 4k stream
HAH! 4K is nothing when it comes to trying to fool human visual acuity. Spread over even the Rift's 110°, that's only 1/2 a pixel per arcminute, which doesn't even beat regular acuity let alone hyperacuity, or some of the more esoteric tricks the human visual system pulls to beat a naive view of the eye's Nyquist limit. Check Capability of the Human Visual System for a good intro. From the summary, you need 1 pixel per 0.5 arcseconds in good lighting to be truly imperceptible compared to reality. Over even the Rift's 110°, that's horizontally 792000 pixels.

And worse, you need to get the framerate up to way above 60fps to prevent a plethora of artifacts when moving your eyes or head, though ligthboost-style backlight flashing mitigates this somewhat, though resulting in some less offensive artifacts of it's own. See Abrash's blog (and his previous few posts) for details.

*swear removed*

What you should have said was: I say good fellow, I think I may disagree with you on a few points.
LordPyrinc 9th August 2013, 02:48 Quote
The more I read about Oculus Rift, the more I want one. I really enjoy the immersive nature of first person viewpoint games and can't wait to be able to use something like this.

Conversely, I hate the over the shoulder view perspective that some games use, I mean why bother? It's so unnatural compared to first person view. You might as well be playing a top down style view point like D3.
Corky42 9th August 2013, 08:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordPyrinc
Conversely, I hate the over the shoulder view perspective that some games use, I mean why bother? It's so unnatural compared to first person view. You might as well be playing a top down style view point like D3.

Me to, i cant stand third person perspective games , and will avoid any game with over the shoulder view. It became popular in games as its easier to control than first person view when your using a game controller with tiny little joysticks on it.
edzieba 9th August 2013, 15:34 Quote
Over-the-shoulder is far preferable to FPS for 3D platformers. Landing jumps when you can't see your feet without losing sight of where you're going is an exercise in frustration.

This might change when dedicated VR platformers become more common (Rift Rush is a bit rough around the edges, but fun), but then again you can still use the third-person viewpoint in VR: just treat the camera as a floating head you can move around the character with a controller. Some people have reported that slaving camera orbit to head orientation is surprisingly not that nauseating, but you then run into issues as to what to do when the camera hit's a wall: do you 'clip' your head through solid objects, or do you decouple head movement from camera movement (BIG VR no-no).
Mirror's Edge is not a good VR showcase, as currently you cannot face in one direction and run in another, making jump aiming guided by your face.
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