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Microsoft allowing self publishing on Xbox One

Microsoft allowing self publishing on Xbox One

Previously, Microsoft's policy insisted on all developers going through an established publisher.

Microsoft has decided to allow indie developers to self publish titles on the Xbox One.

Under Microsoft's current setup, all developers need to go through an established publisher in order to sell one of their games on the Xbox's digital marketplace, a stance which has put off a lot of developers.

The approval process is going to resemble Apple's process with a similar 14-day turnaround on certification, replacing the current approach of meticulous code checking and testing. Developers will be able to set their own release dates and pricing on the platform.

In a further boost to indie developers, Xbox corporate vice-president Marc Whitten told Eurogamer that every Xbox One unit can also be used for development.

'Our vision is that every person can be a creator,' said Whitten. 'That every Xbox One can be used for development. That every game and experience can take advantage of all of the features of Xbox One and Xbox Live. This means self-publishing. This means Kinect, the cloud, achievements. This means great discoverability on Xbox LIVE.'

Further details on the shift in policy has been promised for Gamescom in August.

The decision to allow self publishing brings the Xbox One in line with Sony's Playstation 4, which has promoted its openness to indie developers as part of its reveal. Earlier this week, Nintendo also made a statement that it was looking to work with more indie developers, dropping its requirement for all developers to be based in a physical office.

Since Microsoft's Xbox One unveiling press conference, it has been changing its mind on some of the more unpopular features of the console. Processes around limiting the sharing of games and combating used game sales that were built into the system for example were ditched following uproar from the community.

This is also not the first move that Microsoft has made to make itself more indie friendly. Earlier this year it dropped the requirement for fees to be paid when titles on its service needed patching.