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MLG, ESL and DreamHack team up to drive eSport popularity

MLG, ESL and DreamHack team up to drive eSport popularity

The popularity of eSports is continuing to rise with popular tournament titles including Starcraft 2 and League of Legends.

Major League Gaming (MLG), Electronic Sports League (ESL) and DreamHack have joined forces to help boost the popularity of eSports.

The three eSport-organising giants will co-ordinate their tournament activity for the rest of 2012 and in 2013's upcoming season.

This united front includes implementing a universal ranking system for all the major tournament titles to allow for consistent seeding and event qualification and a single calendar to minimise conflicts and ensure that player or fan schedules are not too hectic. A single competition structure across all tournaments will also be put in place.

'The growth of competitive gaming over the last few years has been staggering and we have now reached the point where we need to align our efforts to advance eSports on a global scale,' said MLG chief executive and co-founder Sundance DiGiovanni. 'The collaboration between our organisations is the first step in a united effort to take the sport to the next level while benefiting all of those involved.'

The partnership will also bring together the three organisations' marketing efforts and involve cross promotion and support for all of the leagues and will share a roster of commentators.

'DreamHack’s philosophy has always been about inclusion and never exclusion,' said DreamHack chief executive Robert Ohlén. 'This joint initiative by MLG, ESL and DreamHack is something that will insure the continued growth of eSports that we have been seeing during the past 24 months, for the players, the audience and the industry as a whole.'

Within the eSports community, mutterings have been made that Starcraft 2 is declining in popularity with League of Legends rising to take its place. Last month, professional Korean team SlayerS, founded by infamous Starcraft legend Lim "Boxer" Yo Hwan, announced its disbandment with three of the team's high profile members also announcing they were quitting Starcraft 2 to compete in League of Legends instead.

As a whole however, eSports to appear to still be growing in popularity. Earlier this year, MLG boasted that its Anaheim Spring Championship tournament drew in more than 1.35 million viewers in a single day.

8 Comments

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Tangster 16th November 2012, 08:21 Quote
Just like physical sports, I dislike watching and not doing. I don't mind commentated playthrough videos on youtube, but competitive gameplay isn't all that fascinating for me and fails to hold my attention for long.
DarkFear 16th November 2012, 08:25 Quote
I wonder how the guy in the front of the photo gets headphones on with all that hair in the way....
Griffter 16th November 2012, 09:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkFear
I wonder how the guy in the front of the photo gets headphones on with all that hair in the way....

hahhahahahaha! its cool man, 3 popped collars cool!
wafflesomd 16th November 2012, 09:21 Quote
Why the hell are pro SC2 players not going to dota2... Then again Boxer was probably offered quite a bit of money to play LoL exclusively. Riots actions in the past have made it clear that they're going to use their wallet to keep other moba games out of the spotlight.

Why are the watered down games at so many big tournaments. You have LoL, but no Dota 2. Halo 4, but no CS or Quake. Watching the Halo matches @ MLG were hysterical. Half the players couldn't turn around fast enough to defend themselves in firefights because controllers.
m4rk3d 16th November 2012, 12:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by wafflesomd
Why the hell are pro SC2 players not going to dota2... Then again Boxer was probably offered quite a bit of money to play LoL exclusively. Riots actions in the past have made it clear that they're going to use their wallet to keep other moba games out of the spotlight.

A few things:
  • Boxer's not going to play LoL, he was just disbanding Slayers.
  • Riot doesn't control LoL in Asia, it's run by Garena.
  • LoL is huge in Korea (and the rest of SE Asia) right now. DOTA is hardly played over there.
  • You're right the players are moving for money, but it's stream money, team money, TV money, sponsorship money etc. as well as tournament winnings.
  • MLG et al want viewers. LoL provides more viewers than any other MOBA at the moment (1.15 million concurrent online viewers during the S2 Champs, another 2.4 million watched the live TV broadcast in China and Korea.) Same goes for Halo 4 compared to FPSes. Whether you think they're watered down or not, MLG, DH, ESL and the big players are businesses that want ad money to grow. More viewers means more ad revenue, so they will always choose popular over "worthy".
wafflesomd 16th November 2012, 23:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by m4rk3d
Quote:
Originally Posted by wafflesomd
Why the hell are pro SC2 players not going to dota2... Then again Boxer was probably offered quite a bit of money to play LoL exclusively. Riots actions in the past have made it clear that they're going to use their wallet to keep other moba games out of the spotlight.

A few things:
  • Boxer's not going to play LoL, he was just disbanding Slayers.
  • Riot doesn't control LoL in Asia, it's run by Garena.
  • LoL is huge in Korea (and the rest of SE Asia) right now. DOTA is hardly played over there.
  • You're right the players are moving for money, but it's stream money, team money, TV money, sponsorship money etc. as well as tournament winnings.
  • MLG et al want viewers. LoL provides more viewers than any other MOBA at the moment (1.15 million concurrent online viewers during the S2 Champs, another 2.4 million watched the live TV broadcast in China and Korea.) Same goes for Halo 4 compared to FPSes. Whether you think they're watered down or not, MLG, DH, ESL and the big players are businesses that want ad money to grow. More viewers means more ad revenue, so they will always choose popular over "worthy".

That was sad to read :(

It's all about the money.
Sloth 16th November 2012, 23:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by wafflesomd
That was sad to read :(

It's all about the money.
The reason I hate e-sports, apart from the whole "would rather be playing" thing. Competitive games are meant to be played for fun, for the intrinsic joy of competition and victory. Playing for the sake of earning money and prizes is completely missing the point.
jimmyjj 18th November 2012, 19:50 Quote
I have watched some incredibly exciting Starcraft 2 matches.

Starcraft 2 has a chance to stay at the forefront of pro gaming if the Heart of the Swarm expansion has good multi player and introduces new, fun but balanced changes.

We will see!
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