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Diablo III 1.1 to bring player-versus-player combat

Diablo III 1.1 to bring player-versus-player combat

The upcoming Diablo III 1.1 patch is to introduce player-versus-player (PvP) combat to the game.

Blizzard has confirmed that an upcoming patch will introduce player-versus-player (PvP) combat to its best-selling action role-playing game (RPG) Diablo III.

While previous release of the game had included the ability to attack, kill, loot and even remove the ear from other player characters, Diablo III launched without such antisocial functionality. For those who miss the feature, fear not: patch 1.1 is to reintroduce the concept to the universe.

According to details released by Blizzard, Diablo III 1.1 will switch on player-versus-player combat for the first time in the game. As with previous titles in the series, it will include anti-griefing functionality to prevent high-level characters hunting low-level players for sport, and will likely include the same grisly trophies - severed ears - as Diablo II.

In addition to the PvP combat mechanic, the patch is also tipped to address a balancing issue in the game whereby Legendary and Magic items of different levels are equally as powerful. While full details are not yet available as to exactly how the problem will be fixed, Blizzard has announced plans to 'just straight-out buff Legendary items in a future patch. These buffs will not be retroactive, and so they'll only apply to new Legendary items found after the patch. In the long term, we're looking at simply expanding the affix diversity and unique bonuses of Legendary items, and we'll be able to share more details after the PvP patch.'

While the balancing fixes and PvP combat additions of the upcoming patch will be popular, they will likely do little to address the tide of disappointment the buggy launch of the game brought to many. Blizzard's decision to include always-on internet-based digital rights management (DRM) technology, even in single player mode, left launch-day buyers unable to play their game as the company's servers crashed under unanticipated demand.

Despite the early niggles, Diablo III is proving popular: last week it was announced that, with over 3.5 million copies sold on its first day, the game has entered the record books as the fastest-selling PC game in history.

25 Comments

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p3n 29th May 2012, 11:35 Quote
The launchday servers never 'crashed' they were busy... such a load of mis-information out there; and is logging into battle.net DRM? Really?
Gareth Halfacree 29th May 2012, 11:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by p3n
The launchday servers never 'crashed' they were busy... such a load of mis-information out there; and is logging into battle.net DRM? Really?
There were several times when the servers were completely unavailable, which is close enough to 'crashed' for me. And, given that the prime incentive for forcing users to have an always-on internet connection even when playing single player is to minimise piracy, I'd say categorising it as DRM is accurate too.
sotu1 29th May 2012, 14:13 Quote
They should have a functionality where you can grief higher level characters, but not lower level characters. A lot more rewarding to beat someone bigger than you :D
Bede 29th May 2012, 15:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by p3n
The launchday servers never 'crashed' they were busy... such a load of mis-information out there; and is logging into battle.net DRM? Really?

Logging into battle.net *is* DRM. How can you not see that? It's just the same as Steam or Origin. Digital Rights Management - it manages how you play the game.
Bauul 29th May 2012, 16:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bede
Quote:
Originally Posted by p3n
The launchday servers never 'crashed' they were busy... such a load of mis-information out there; and is logging into battle.net DRM? Really?

Logging into battle.net *is* DRM. How can you not see that? It's just the same as Steam or Origin. Digital Rights Management - it manages how you play the game.

Exactly. Digital Rights Management exert control over your ability to play the game regardless of your physical ownership of anything. Any kind of dynamic software-based limitation on how you play the game, from online log-ins to maximum number of installs, is DRM.

The difference is some DRM is very lax, whilst others are positively draconian.
Salty Wagyu 29th May 2012, 16:23 Quote
hmm, hope it's something that can be toggled to "off". Not interested in the PvP really.
GuilleAcoustic 29th May 2012, 16:40 Quote
I mostly plays alone or with 1 / 2 friends when they are "on". Not interested for the moment.
fdbh96 29th May 2012, 17:18 Quote
I don't get PvP, is it when you are playing co op or is it a separate game mode. It would be quite annoying to be half way through an act for a team-mate to finish you off :/
Eiffie 29th May 2012, 17:37 Quote
For a game that's "always on-line" the servers have been unconnectable for less than 24 hours since it came out.100% acceptable in my book because of the huge amount of players and it being such a big title. All in all, I'd say the launch went quite well actually.

PVP was never my thing in diablo 2, not sure how I will really like it in the new game.
Yslen 29th May 2012, 17:38 Quote
As regards the DRM thing, it's been very stable for me, I've only had a couple of issues, nothing major or particularly bothersome. It's a lot better than having to use origin or GFWL.

PvP is a good addition, though it's hardly what I play the game for. That said, my experience of Diablo PvP comes from D2, where everyone you met used hacks and therefore PvP was just retarded. It might be pretty good fun in D3, especially if you can do team fights etc. I'll have to wait and see.
GuilleAcoustic 29th May 2012, 17:46 Quote
I have good hope for D3 in the future. I already love it and if D3 gets the same quality update than D2, then it'll we a really good game.

EDIT : Please Blizard, bring us an expansion of the same level than LOD :D
Yslen 29th May 2012, 17:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by fdbh96
I don't get PvP, is it when you are playing co op or is it a separate game mode. It would be quite annoying to be half way through an act for a team-mate to finish you off :/

The way it worked in D2 was that you party up with someone and they can then not harm you. To leave your party you had to be in town (I think) where they couldn't hurt you anyway, and you would be notified that they had left. Essentially this meant it was impossible for someone to ambush you mid-PvE grind.

Not sure how it will work in D3. I suspect it will be the above system plus some PvP specific arena-type maps.
hyperion 29th May 2012, 18:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by fdbh96
I don't get PvP, is it when you are playing co op or is it a separate game mode. It would be quite annoying to be half way through an act for a team-mate to finish you off :/

That's exactly how it was in D2. You start a public game, your group reaches Baal, the paladin starts spamming hammers -> teleports to town -> turns on pvp, the hammers he previously cast around you kill everyone as he is now hostile, calls everyone n00bs and leaves game.

Amazons could do it too. Spam guided arrow, tele back to town, go pvp and the guided arrows still in mid-flight would kill her former team-mates. Even if you didn't die (which you did because damage was insane) you still couldn't fight back because they were already in town/safe-zone.

The whole pk would take about 2 seconds. It probably wont be possible in D3 because town portals aren't instant.
fdbh96 29th May 2012, 18:49 Quote
To be honest, after hearing about all these hacks, no wonder blizzard made D3 only only...
Omnituens 29th May 2012, 21:24 Quote
Crafting system is crap. Bring back the Cube.

500g to upgrade LOWEST LEVEL GEMS? Who thought that made sense? By the time you can afford that sort of money on upgrading... you are already finding gems 3 levels above that! Completely useless.
HourBeforeDawn 30th May 2012, 01:14 Quote
what about scrolls? always being able to identify and always being able to go to town makes the game way to freaking easy and well pointless so please bring back the scrolls
cheeriokilla 30th May 2012, 02:40 Quote
So the people claiming that logging in to battle net is DRM don't consider that having the your character stored locally with all the information would be better? because that's what offline mode is. And if you can have that, the game will be instantly hacked, and then unplayable... I'd rather log in to a ****ing server, thank you
hyperion 30th May 2012, 02:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by fdbh96
To be honest, after hearing about all these hacks, no wonder blizzard made D3 only only...

Those weren't hacks, not even exploits; they just played the system. A common hack was maphack, which revealed the map in a whole area as soon as you entered, so you instantly knew exactly where to go. Even that was just the tip of the iceberg. Almost everyone was using it. The major hacks were hacked items with stats better than any legit drop, drop hacks that caused players to drop all their gear when the hacker opened a trade window with them, and item duping. Even now you can find websites that sell such items; just google d2items.

All the aforementioned hacks were on battle.net. Not in offline games, not on private servers, they were on blizzard's official servers. The argument that "always online" is to protect from cheating is a blatant lie.

They've already had account hacking incidents in D3.
HourBeforeDawn 30th May 2012, 04:41 Quote
yup and there was already a gold exploit detected that Blizzard is trying to stop.
Star*Dagger 31st May 2012, 21:55 Quote
If you think that games, esp on the PC are going to be free of DRM you need to leave that little island and get some sun.

Steam and Battlenet are the perfect forms of DRM, non-obtrusive for us and always on for the companies.
Even single player games like Dragon Age, I played through steam. Get over it, or go play on the PS3 (Dust is what I recommend there)

Yours in Steamy Plasma,
Star*Dagger


-.
fdbh96 1st June 2012, 09:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger

Steam and Battlenet are the perfect forms of DRM, non-obtrusive for us and always on for the companies.
-.

How is battlenet a perfect form of DRM, I spent 10 mins last night waiting for error 37 to go away, and this is 2 weeks after release!

I don't mind steam to be fair, but Battlenet is shocking...
GuilleAcoustic 1st June 2012, 09:34 Quote
took me 2 hours to loggin D3 yesterday :(
Gareth Halfacree 1st June 2012, 09:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
If you think that games, esp on the PC are going to be free of DRM you need to leave that little island and get some sun.
Funny you should say that: I just bought a selection of games which I can play on all my computers, offline, with absolutely no DRM.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
Steam and Battlenet are the perfect forms of DRM, non-obtrusive for us and always on for the companies.
Steam has an offline mode; Diablo III does not. I point you to the two replies sandwiched in this thread: legitimate owners who are unable to play a game they have paid for due to always-on DRM. If you don't mind only playing Diablo III when Blizzard's servers say you can play Diablo III, then that's your prerogative - but don't bury your head in the sand and say that the requirement to have an always-on internet connection for a single-player game is anything other than DRM.
Paradigm Shifter 1st June 2012, 21:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
If you think that games, esp on the PC are going to be free of DRM you need to leave that little island and get some sun.

Recently, as the gaming industry has polarised into two camps - the major publishers hammering users with always-on DRM and those experimenting with DRM-free as an option, such as GOG, Humble Bundle and the odd publisher who tests the water with a physical release with no CD-key/SecuROM checks, I now always support the DRM-free option if it's of interest.

Thus, even though I already own thee of the five titles on the current Humble Bundle, I bought it anyway - and for a fair markup over the 'average' because I want to support DRM-free gaming... (I'm also, as I said in another thread, a sucker for a good OST) and hopefully, if others take the same attitude, a message can be sent that actually, DRM-free is a viable option. An option which is taken by honest individuals who wish to support the hard work of the developers but at the same time don't wish to be treated like criminals with how draconian some of the modern DRM can be. :)

I don't know all the reasons Blizzard used as justification for the route they took with Diablo 3 (although anti-piracy is obviously part of it). However, even though I don't play it, I'm surprised and disheartened that a developer that obviously understands the demands an always-online service has on server-side hardware (World of Warcraft has run for a long time and been very successful) could underestimate how popular Diablo 3 was going to be, and could be so underprepared for the sheer volume of people wanting to connect and play. Diablo has been a PC gaming legend for well over a decade, it's entered cult status. I suspect that they were too blinded by the potential dollar signs of ideas like the 'Real Money Auction House' to invest in sufficient initial server infrastructure, which is a shame as their experience from WoW should have prepared them better.
Sloth 1st June 2012, 23:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Funny you should say that: I just bought a selection of games which I can play on all my computers, offline, with absolutely no DRM.
I believe it's fairly well understood that he's talking about a standard for most games, not a strict rule that every game will have DRM. I agree with him on that, there'll always be a DRM-free circle (almost a counter-culture, if you will) but the chances of that becoming the standard are depressingly low.
Quote:
Steam has an offline mode; Diablo III does not. I point you to the two replies sandwiched in this thread: legitimate owners who are unable to play a game they have paid for due to always-on DRM. If you don't mind only playing Diablo III when Blizzard's servers say you can play Diablo III, then that's your prerogative - but don't bury your head in the sand and say that the requirement to have an always-on internet connection for a single-player game is anything other than DRM.
I agree that Steam is a better system for providing an offline option, but would like to point out that server issues are a problem with the implementation, not the system's design. In theory you should be able to play Diablo III at any time that you're connected to the internet.

I make a point of that because Steam also isn't flawless. The offline mode you mention always comes with a flood of reports from people who it doesn't work for. They both have implementation problems, but the system design of Steam is better assuming both Valve and Blizzard got everything working correctly, and I think that's what's important.
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