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Steam offering From Dust refunds

Steam offering From Dust refunds

Steam is offering refunds on Ubisoft's From Dust owing to changes to the DRM.

Steam are now officially offering to refund any purchase of From Dust after an angry backlash over the controversial u-turn over the DRM used in Ubisoft's god game.

Ubisoft has also announced that it is ‘currently working on a patch that will eliminate the need for any online authentication for From Dust.’ The company is estimating 2 week before the the patch is released.

Ubisoft originally told users that From Dust would not feature the controversial and draconian always-online DRM used in some Ubisoft PC games, then inexplicably reneged on the policy without comment.

If you bought the game and wish to return it, you can either contact Ubisoft directly or wait for Steam to contact you via email.

You can check out our From Dust review for more information on the game.

Are you thinking of forgiving Ubisoft or just getting rid of it as soon as possible? Tell us in the forums.

33 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Phalanx 25th August 2011, 12:09 Quote
I'm glad I waited instead of preordering now. As it stands, I won't be buying this, at all. Shame really, as I don't like seeing the developer being shafted. However I won't have Ubi's **** on my PC.
loftie 25th August 2011, 12:20 Quote
I still don't understand why companies like Ubi still put crap like this into their games. Are they really just that stupid. Buy game get DRM hate game because DRM spoils it/is annoying/won't let you play the game. Man, at least it stops all those nasty pirates. Oh wait. Pirate game no DRM problems. It's getting to the stage that you have to pirate a game you buy, so you can actually play the damn thing.

Next up in the world of DRM, Ubi adds a usb powered anal probe, that way they can truly fk you over when you play their games
dark_avenger 25th August 2011, 12:52 Quote
Didn't they learn from the last time they had to patch a game because there DRM didn't work?

Guess the torrent sites will enjoy the extra traffic....
GuilleAcoustic 25th August 2011, 13:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by loftie
Next up in the world of DRM, Ubi adds a usb powered anal probe, that way they can truly fk you over when you play their games

Cartman should have no prob then :-P
the-beast 25th August 2011, 13:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by loftie
I still don't understand why companies like Ubi still put crap like this into their games.
- Valve do and people seam to fallover themselves praising gabe for it!
Phalanx 25th August 2011, 13:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by the-beast
- Valve do and people seam to fallover themselves praising gabe for it!

Valve require a constant internet connection? Do explain, I'd love to hear this one...
loftie 25th August 2011, 13:34 Quote
I've bought a fair few games off steam, and I've never had any issue with the DRM. Or playing them offline.
bbshammo 25th August 2011, 14:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by the-beast
Quote:
Originally Posted by loftie
I still don't understand why companies like Ubi still put crap like this into their games.
- Valve do and people seam to fallover themselves praising gabe for it!

Ahh, the stereotypical hater / fan-boy...

... As usual, doesn't know the difference between facts and their own flawed interpretation.

STEAM doesn't do DRM, you can access your games offline, and I think you only have to log in once a month at most... Basically, I often play offline Steam games without a connection, no worries.

What Ubisoft are doing is natural for half-arsed companies that always look for the easiest, yet inevitably worst, solution to a problem; do what's easiest for them regardless of the impact to their CUSTOMERS.

Not a problem though, as idiots always have to learn the hard way ;)
REMF 25th August 2011, 14:23 Quote
will steam refund me assassins creed 2?

ubisofts cretinous log-in does not work with my firewall, or half a dozen other popular firewalls, and i'll be damned if i'll take my pants down for the internet just to play their game!
Denis_iii 25th August 2011, 14:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbshammo
Quote:
Originally Posted by the-beast
Quote:
Originally Posted by loftie
I still don't understand why companies like Ubi still put crap like this into their games.
- Valve do and people seam to fallover themselves praising gabe for it!

Ahh, the stereotypical hater / fan-boy...

... As usual, doesn't know the difference between facts and their own flawed interpretation.

STEAM doesn't do DRM, you can access your games offline, and I think you only have to log in once a month at most... Basically, I often play offline Steam games without a connection, no worries.

What Ubisoft are doing is natural for half-arsed companies that always look for the easiest, yet inevitably worst, solution to a problem; do what's easiest for them regardless of the impact to their CUSTOMERS.

Not a problem though, as idiots always have to learn the hard way ;)

Steam is a form of DRM as without it you will be unable to play the games you purchased.
However It is not a BS need to always be online bug filled piece of **** draconian form of DRM.

I am a happy Steam user, it is a great DRM platform and an even better gaming service even though I believe they should allow me to at the least change my logon ID, I'd even pay them to allow me to do this, and give unwanted titles away.
Bede 25th August 2011, 15:48 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by REMF
will steam refund me assassins creed 2?

ubisofts cretinous log-in does not work with my firewall, or half a dozen other popular firewalls, and i'll be damned if i'll take my pants down for the internet just to play their game!

Some of us take our pants down to play any game. *looks shifty*
AstralWanderer 25th August 2011, 16:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbshammo
...STEAM doesn't do DRM, you can access your games offline, and I think you only have to log in once a month at most... Basically, I often play offline Steam games without a connection, no worries.
Gosh, so all those Steam forum threads reporting problems with offline mode are just figments of users' imaginations? Well thanks for the clarification. I guess Valve's Offline Mode FAQ (which, amongst other things, notes that you have to be online to enable offline mode for each game) must have it wrong too.

Your definition of DRM must differ from everyone else's too since Valve can (and regularly do) disable accounts resulting in Steam users losing access to their entire collection (examples here, here, here and here - plenty of others around).

And then there is the Steam Subscriber Agreement which contains clauses allowing Valve to:
  • revoke your purchases at any time for virtually any reason (section 5: "Valve may terminate your Account...for any conduct or activity that Valve believes...negatively affects the enjoyment of Steam by other Subscribers");
  • charge extra amounts to your credit card as they please (section 4B: "Valve reserves the right to change our fees or billing methods at any time...") - they have to give 30 days notice but closing your account (and losing access to everything purchased previously, whether you backed them up or not) would be the only way to avoid any such charges;
  • avoid liability if your system is hijacked by malware transmitted through Steam (section 9C: "VALVE DOES NOT GUARANTEE CONTINUOUS, ERROR-FREE, VIRUS-FREE OR SECURE OPERATION..."). This should be particularly significant given Sony's recent problems - at least Playstation owners didn't have to worry about their system being infected with malware allowing others access to their online bank accounts.
For long-term Steam users, section 4B should be the biggest concern since it could be used by Valve to bring in an annual, or even monthly, maintenance fee on all Steam accounts.

It's worth noting that Steam initially refused to provide refunds to many users (just like they refused to provide refunds on APB purchases following Realtime Worlds' closure) and only changed their policy when Ubisoft asked them to.
thil 25th August 2011, 16:37 Quote
Steam has far more carrots than sticks, though.

Ubi DRM? It's all stick, baby.
Snips 25th August 2011, 16:49 Quote
Does that USB powered anal probe come with the Ultimate edition?
mattbailey 25th August 2011, 17:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snips
Does that USB powered anal probe come with the Ultimate edition?

Does it run with Crysis?
azazel1024 25th August 2011, 17:36 Quote
It just like a lot of DRM. It tends to annoy, inconvenience and hurt the customer more than it actually prevents piracy.

Just like eBooks. You have half a dozen (maybe slight exageration) different DRM types as well as several different formats on top of the DRM. So great, you bought a book from Amazon for the Kindle, but the only way to get it to work on your iPad or Android device is with an Kindle reader app. Oh, and if you want to use it on your computer, you need the kindle reader app. If you want to use it on another eBook reader...sorry, you can't. Buy the book through the iTunes store, iBooks on your iPad or iPhone only, sorry.

I point out the issue with that, only because at least with songs and movies it is relatively easy to buy the physical media and convert it yourself to an MP3, MKV, MP4, etc with no DRM attached and use the movie or song you bought on any device you want. Where as a book, buying a phsyical book is hard, time consuming and annoying to convert to DRM freem digital form.

Etc, etc.
Madness_3d 25th August 2011, 18:42 Quote
TBH it's a great game, I've sunk 12 hours into it since launch, finished the story mode and moved on to the challenge mode. It's a great little sandbox game but the lack of AA really lets it down, I've tried forcing it in the Nvidia Control Panel and it still doesn't take. I haven't had an issue with the UbiPlay stuff, but I haven't tried to play it offline. TBH I wouldn't mind a refund but I still do like the game. I'll just hope they patch the rubbish stuff out of it and add AA support in. Could also do with some less pixelated menus.
Toploaded 26th August 2011, 01:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
SNIP.

You have any idea how much kool aid I need to drink now to get over all that?? :-)

I've been aware for while tbh, although I have put so much money into my Steam account I try and live in denial (still, at least 99% of the games I have brought have generally been at dirt cheap discount price, and should I end up shutting steam cause they go for a monthly fee, I'd have gotten my moneys worth from most of the games).

I miss the days of simple 'none disk copy' DRM (where a simple no cd crack would deal with that for your own pc) and X-fire. I drunk the DRM cool-aid when I got given a Valve courtesy account that adds all Valve games for free.

Sigh, time to go and play one of the games I don't really fully own.
Woodspoon 26th August 2011, 03:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denis_iii

Steam is a form of DRM as without it you will be unable to play the games you purchased.

Not really
I play EvE online, I brought it through steam, to play it I just use the shortcut I made to the exe in the steam directory and steam does not start.
To further prove this point, to use the EvE test server I copied the directory from steam put it on a different drive and changed the server connection ip to the test server and still no need for steam.
Dirt 2 is another one I know for sure that works without steam if you use the exe in the game folder.
slothy89 26th August 2011, 05:43 Quote
Steam isn't that bad.. 99% of my games are online MP anyway so a connection is a given.

All I wish for is the ability to gift games you own but no longer want.. How is this any different to specifically buying a game as a gift?
Toploaded 26th August 2011, 06:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodspoon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denis_iii

Steam is a form of DRM as without it you will be unable to play the games you purchased.

Not really
I play EvE online, I brought it through steam, to play it I just use the shortcut I made to the exe in the steam directory and steam does not start.
To further prove this point, to use the EvE test server I copied the directory from steam put it on a different drive and changed the server connection ip to the test server and still no need for steam.
Dirt 2 is another one I know for sure that works without steam if you use the exe in the game folder.

Interesting, I thought Steam would start with all games, I'll have to go through and see what ones will start without, maybe we can make a thread about it.
AstralWanderer 26th August 2011, 11:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toploaded
You have any idea how much kool aid I need to drink now to get over all that?? :-)
*cackles evilly* On the other hand, you (and others) can protect yourself by buying elsewhere in future (and importing them into Steam if you want access to Valve's extras).

That doesn't deal with the increasing number of games using Steamworks though - these effectively make Steam compulsory.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toploaded
I miss the days of simple 'none disk copy' DRM (where a simple no cd crack would deal with that for your own pc) and X-fire.
Games are still being released that use a simple media check, and some are DRM-free (King's Bounty Armored Princess being a recent example, though the Crossworlds expansion requires online activation).

To be fair, most other digital distributors (Impulse, GamersGate) have similar downsides (though their activate-on-install gives you a little more breathing space than activate-on-play) - DRM-free services like GOG are safe, as long as downloads are backed up.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodspoon
I play EvE online, I brought it through steam...To further prove this point, to use the EvE test server I copied the directory from steam put it on a different drive and changed the server connection ip to the test server and still no need for steam.
Sorry, but that doesn't disprove the need for Steam authentication - according to the Steam (Valve) using Dosbox for its "id Super Pack" thread, the online check was done via steam.dll.

To properly verify whether authentication was taking place you would have to:
  1. Unplug your computer's network connection, restart Windows and then start the game in question (ensuring that no Steam-related process could connect and that previous successful activations were not considered - you may need to set your PC's clock one month ahead to be certain on this though) or;
  2. Install a capable third-party firewall (one of the top performers from this list) and use that to monitor (and block) any connections to Steam servers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by slothy89
All I wish for is the ability to gift games you own but no longer want.. How is this any different to specifically buying a game as a gift?
You're asking for the online equivalent of second hand sales, which according to developers makes you more ev1l than Hannibal Lecter, Vlad the Impaler and Blackbeard combined. Yarrghhhh!!! :D
Denis_iii 26th August 2011, 13:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbshammo
...STEAM doesn't do DRM, you can access your games offline, and I think you only have to log in once a month at most... Basically, I often play offline Steam games without a connection, no worries.
Gosh, so all those Steam forum threads reporting problems with offline mode are just figments of users' imaginations? Well thanks for the clarification. I guess Valve's Offline Mode FAQ (which, amongst other things, notes that you have to be online to enable offline mode for each game) must have it wrong too.

Your definition of DRM must differ from everyone else's too since Valve can (and regularly do) disable accounts resulting in Steam users losing access to their entire collection (examples here, here, here and here - plenty of others around).

And then there is the Steam Subscriber Agreement which contains clauses allowing Valve to:
  • revoke your purchases at any time for virtually any reason (section 5: "Valve may terminate your Account...for any conduct or activity that Valve believes...negatively affects the enjoyment of Steam by other Subscribers");
  • charge extra amounts to your credit card as they please (section 4B: "Valve reserves the right to change our fees or billing methods at any time...") - they have to give 30 days notice but closing your account (and losing access to everything purchased previously, whether you backed them up or not) would be the only way to avoid any such charges;
  • avoid liability if your system is hijacked by malware transmitted through Steam (section 9C: "VALVE DOES NOT GUARANTEE CONTINUOUS, ERROR-FREE, VIRUS-FREE OR SECURE OPERATION..."). This should be particularly significant given Sony's recent problems - at least Playstation owners didn't have to worry about their system being infected with malware allowing others access to their online bank accounts.
For long-term Steam users, section 4B should be the biggest concern since it could be used by Valve to bring in an annual, or even monthly, maintenance fee on all Steam accounts.

It's worth noting that Steam initially refused to provide refunds to many users (just like they refused to provide refunds on APB purchases following Realtime Worlds' closure) and only changed their policy when Ubisoft asked them to.

Woah.......ok, I'm out as that is just scary and seems to show a rather shitty mindset on Valves part....no more full price AAA game purchases from steam. Serves me right for not reading the EULA though but all my new purchases will be via http://www.direct2drive.com/.
impar 26th August 2011, 14:08 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
And then there is the Steam Subscriber Agreement which contains clauses allowing Valve to:
  • revoke your purchases at any time for virtually any reason (section 5: "Valve may terminate your Account...for any conduct or activity that Valve believes...negatively affects the enjoyment of Steam by other Subscribers");
This is a bad action from Steam because...?
Isnt it similar to a VAC ban?
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
charge extra amounts to your credit card as they please (section 4B: "Valve reserves the right to change our fees or billing methods at any time...") - they have to give 30 days notice but closing your account (and losing access to everything purchased previously, whether you backed them up or not) would be the only way to avoid any such charges;
You can cancel the purchase of the game (subscription). No need to cancel the Steam account.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
avoid liability if your system is hijacked by malware transmitted through Steam (section 9C: "VALVE DOES NOT GUARANTEE CONTINUOUS, ERROR-FREE, VIRUS-FREE OR SECURE OPERATION..."). This should be particularly significant given Sony's recent problems - at least Playstation owners didn't have to worry about their system being infected with malware allowing others access to their online bank accounts.
And Steam has been the cause of how many malware infections since 2003?
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
For long-term Steam users, section 4B should be the biggest concern since it could be used by Valve to bring in an annual, or even monthly, maintenance fee on all Steam accounts.
What makes you think that?

Why so much FUD, AstralWanderer... :?
Woodspoon 26th August 2011, 14:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodspoon
I play EvE online, I brought it through steam...To further prove this point, to use the EvE test server I copied the directory from steam put it on a different drive and changed the server connection ip to the test server and still no need for steam.
Sorry, but that doesn't disprove the need for Steam authentication - according to the Steam (Valve) using Dosbox for its "id Super Pack" thread, the online check was done via steam.dll.

To properly verify whether authentication was taking place you would have to:
  1. Unplug your computer's network connection, restart Windows and then start the game in question (ensuring that no Steam-related process could connect and that previous successful activations were not considered - you may need to set your PC's clock one month ahead to be certain on this though) or;
  2. Install a capable third-party firewall (one of the top performers from this list) and use that to monitor (and block) any connections to Steam servers.

It may not "properly" verify it in the way's you describe, but lets face it, it's a pretty good indication that you don't need steam to play all of your steam games.
re: the steam subscriber agreement clauses, I'm pretty sure you'll find thing's like that in most subscriber agreements, pretty standard stuff that gives them the option to do whatever they want whenever they want without any form of liability should it all go horribly wrong, nothing out of the ordinary really.
AstralWanderer 26th August 2011, 14:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denis_iii
...all my new purchases will be via http://www.direct2drive.com/.
To be fair Direct2Drive have their downsides also (per-play activation and encrypted .exe files that broke compatibility with game mods, the last time I checked). The "least worst" option may be GamersGate (per-install activation - but apparently possible to copy the unencrypted, and thereby possibly DRM-free, installer once activation has been successful).
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
This is a bad action from Steam because...?
Isnt it similar to a VAC ban?
Nope - a VAC ban limits your access to multiplayer servers, quite different from blocking your ability to run any game in your Steam collection.
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
You can cancel the purchase of the game (subscription). No need to cancel the Steam account.
You need to read section 4B again - cancelling your account is the only way out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
And Steam has been the cause of how many malware infections since 2003?
It isn't the past that matters, but the future.
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
What makes you think that?
Oooh, no reason at all - aside from Valve being able to grab an extra US$1.3 billion or more annual income with relatively little effort (assuming 30 million active accounts, $5/month fee and an 80% acceptance rate).
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Why so much FUD, AstralWanderer... :?
Conversely why the fanboy-ism? Steam's TOS is available for you to review, the links for those adversely affected by Valve's actions are plentiful and the reasons for future abuse would seem obvious. Valve is a company and their job is to maximise income - why shouldn't people anticipate them making commercial decisions?
AstralWanderer 26th August 2011, 14:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodspoon
It may not "properly" verify it in the way's you describe, but lets face it, it's a pretty good indication that you don't need steam to play all of your steam games.
It shows that not all games start the Steam client - no more than that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodspoon
...I'm pretty sure you'll find thing's like that in most subscriber agreements, pretty standard stuff that gives them the option to do whatever they want whenever they want without any form of liability should it all go horribly wrong, nothing out of the ordinary really.
Valve aren't the only ones, true - but their ability to disable customers' access to their purchases gives them an ability to enforce that POS TOS, not available to most other publishers (aside from EA and Ubisoft).
impar 26th August 2011, 18:14 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
Nope - a VAC ban limits your access to multiplayer servers, quite different from blocking your ability to run any game in your Steam collection.
Steam has 30M users, how many times has that be enforced? And what actions were the affected users doing at the time?
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
You need to read section 4B again - cancelling your account is the only way out.
Section 4B always refers to cancellation of your Account or Subscription.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
It isn't the past that matters, but the future.
Steams future seems pretty bright.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
Oooh, no reason at all - aside from Valve being able to grab an extra US$1.3 billion or more annual income with relatively little effort (assuming 30 million active accounts, $5/month fee and an 80% acceptance rate).
More unbased FUD?
It says it can change "fees and billing methods", so Steam can change the price of games and stop sending the invoice via e-mail, still have to give a 30 day notice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
Conversely why the fanboy-ism?
Not fanboysm at all. Was upset I had to install and create a Steam account for HL2, but now, after 7 years, am convinced that Steam is just something that works, much better than the competition and PC gaming wouldnt be the same without it.

If you wish to keep fighting windmills, have fun, just dont spread FUD.;)
AstralWanderer 26th August 2011, 18:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Steam has 30M users, how many times has that be enforced? And what actions were the affected users doing at the time?
How often? Valve are the only ones who can say for sure - all we can see are the (thousands of) reports from affected users.

As for their actions - check the links for yourself (mostly Paypal issues - but for Valve to terminate an entire account over a single game's disputed payment is disproportionate to put it mildly).
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Section 4B always refers to cancellation of your Account or Subscription.
If Valve choose to charge a fee (subscription) for accounts, then canceling one means closing the other.
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
More unbased FUD?
It says it can change "fees and billing methods", so Steam can change the price of games and stop sending the invoice via e-mail, still have to give a 30 day notice.
"Valve reserves the right to change our fees or billing methods at any time" means they can change (and charge) as they please - after giving notice. Whether they will is a matter of conjecture, but Valve would profit greatly from doing so. Simple arithmetic - not FUD.
Phil Rhodes 26th August 2011, 18:39 Quote
Quote:
Steam has 30M users, how many times has that be enforced?

We can't find out, which is one of the biggest problems with this.

They could be evil, and we have no idea whether they are being evil or not. What I suspect will actually happen with Steam is that one day - be that next year or next decade - it will become less successful and they'll stop supporting it.

I suspect it won't be much longer than "next decade", anyway. At that point, hundreds of millions of pounds' worth of software around the world will instantly evaporate.

That is not OK.
impar 26th August 2011, 18:57 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
How often? Valve are the only ones who can say for sure - all we can see are the (thousands of) reports from affected users.

As for their actions - check the links for yourself (mostly Paypal issues - but for Valve to terminate an entire account over a single game's disputed payment is disproportionate to put it mildly).
Seem to be Paypal issues and/or situations poorly managed by users.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
If Valve choose to charge a fee (subscription) for accounts, then canceling one means closing the other.
Fee, in the context of Steam Subscriber Agreement, is the price of a game.
Subscription, in the context of Steam Subscriber Agreement, is a game.
Nothing to do with paying a fee/subscription for a Steam account.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
"Valve reserves the right to change our fees or billing methods at any time" means they can change (and charge) as they please - after giving notice.
No it doesnt mean they can charge as they please, it means Steam can change the price of the game and how you receive your invoice (I usually receive by e-mail), after warning the user.
There is nothing about "monthly charge for a Steam account".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
We can't find out, which is one of the biggest problems with this.
They could be evil, ...
Or they can be "not-evil".
Denis_iii 29th August 2011, 20:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toploaded
Interesting, I thought Steam would start with all games, I'll have to go through and see what ones will start without, maybe we can make a thread about it.

+1
Denis_iii 29th August 2011, 20:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
To be fair Direct2Drive have their downsides also (per-play activation and encrypted .exe files that broke compatibility with game mods, the last time I checked). The "least worst" option may be GamersGate (per-install activation - but apparently possible to copy the unencrypted, and thereby possibly DRM-free, installer once activation has been successful).
Nope - a VAC ban limits your access to multiplayer servers, quite different from blocking your ability to run any game in your Steam collection.
You need to read section 4B again - cancelling your account is the only way out.
It isn't the past that matters, but the future.
Oooh, no reason at all - aside from Valve being able to grab an extra US$1.3 billion or more annual income with relatively little effort (assuming 30 million active accounts, $5/month fee and an 80% acceptance rate).
Conversely why the fanboy-ism? Steam's TOS is available for you to review, the links for those adversely affected by Valve's actions are plentiful and the reasons for future abuse would seem obvious. Valve is a company and their job is to maximise income - why shouldn't people anticipate them making commercial decisions?

I heard different from totalhalibit....I suppose at the end of the end if the distributor screws you over there will always be cracks available.
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