bit-gamer.net

EA: Physical media still has a future

EA: Physical media still has a future

Electronic Arts has said that it still sees a future for physical media.

In an interview with Eurogamer, the head of EA Europe, Jens Uwe Intat, has said that he is convinced there is a future for physical media.

'The amount of data our developers put into a game grows so fast' he said. 'You give them storage space and they use it. As fast as the pipes grow, those guys are so creative.'

'Secondly, there are people who just like to have a physical copy of a game.'

'Thirdly, there is still this impulse purchasing and gift purchasing where people just like to give a physical present to somebody, rather than a voucher or an attachment to an email.'

These comments echo EA’s CEO, John Riccitiello, who has previously cast doubt on the practical usage of cloud based gaming services, such as the soon to be released Onlive.

Do you think this is good news for brick-and-mortar games retailers? Tell us in the forums.

58 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Bede 22nd August 2011, 15:13 Quote
Damn straight it does. I do not like downloading games of 15gb or more, takes forever on my connection. A couple of DVDs on the other hand work great (until they degrade and break :D).
faugusztin 22nd August 2011, 15:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bede
A couple of DVDs on the other hand work great (until they degrade and break :D).

Reminds me of Dune 2 on Amiga. Insert floppy disk 1-5 :( :D.
CrazyJoe 22nd August 2011, 15:17 Quote
For new releases, the physical copy is always cheaper. I like cheaper.
GhostRider_77 22nd August 2011, 15:19 Quote
I always prefer a DVD copy. Maybe one day when the UK has proper broadband the digital option might make more sense.
MaverickWill 22nd August 2011, 15:21 Quote
"Of course we still love DVDs! How else are we going to force Steam users to install Origin? They're not gonna download it!"
Parge 22nd August 2011, 15:22 Quote
Price wise, yes, physical copies are cheaper (though they shouldn't be!) - the second this changes - It'll be all over for physical media for me.
TheStockBroker 22nd August 2011, 15:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bede
Damn straight it does. I do not like downloading games of 15gb or more, takes forever on my connection. A couple of DVDs on the other hand work great (until they degrade and break :D).

On the contrary though my friend, personally speaking, 15GBs doesn't take more than an hour and a half to download for me - This is much less time than it would take me to get to a brick and mortar store and back home again - and this is something that I can purchase, and subsequently play when I feel bored anytime after 6pm/on a bank holiday/public holiday when the shops are closed, more often then not, it's also cheaper that a brick and mortar store purchase, and equivalent to an internet retailer price - which would take a few days to arrive.

Needless to say, all my games are safely stored together on steam where possible. Software bliss. I'm looking forwards to the Windows 8 'app store' for these very reasons!

TSB
will_123 22nd August 2011, 15:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyJoe
For new releases, the physical copy is always cheaper. I like cheaper.

Ha so true. I do enjoy cheaper aswell!
Telltale Boy 22nd August 2011, 15:27 Quote
I love Steam and I wish I could have all my games on there. Unfortunately my broadband speed works against me and it often feels like a massive hassle having to leave my computer downloading for three nights just to download one 5GB game. :(

So more and more I'm finding it much easier to buy physical copies and then just add them to my Steam games. I just wish that Steam would let you change the image for non-steam games when in the Grid view, the pixelated icons look rubbish next to my nice lovely steam games.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStockBroker
15GBs doesn't take more than an hour and a half to download for me

Try ~80 hours for a 15GB download and then see how you feel. That's on a good day.
DriftCarl 22nd August 2011, 15:37 Quote
I never want a physical copy of a game again to be honest.
I like steam, when I got my new PC, I just downloaded steam and installed the games I will play.
Same with starcraft too, I got the client from my account login and downloaded it all from online.

I see an argument for physical media, but with most new games now, you cant resell them, which is the only reason I would want a physical copy. Although I guess I could sell my steam or battlenet account if i wantd to.

Save the planet, buy digital copies :p
mucgoo 22nd August 2011, 15:41 Quote
How many people actually go to a shop to buy games now. Either download or online DVD copy. Whichever is cheaper.
Toploaded 22nd August 2011, 15:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bede
A couple of DVDs on the other hand work great (until they degrade and break :D).

Reminds me of Dune 2 on Amiga. Insert floppy disk 1-5 :( :D.

Monkey Island 2! 12 disks damn it, worth every swap though. I got a second drive for it in the end (I think if memory serves you have to swap out disk 2 very often, so having that in a drive all the time cut the swaps by at least 50%).
TheStockBroker 22nd August 2011, 15:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Telltale Boy
Try ~80 hours for a 15GB download and then see how you feel. That's on a good day.

You have to believe me when I say I understand; I do. The state of internet access in the United Kingdom is appalling, as with everything else. But the problem lies with your internet connection, and your ISP. From what you've said though - which I found quite positive, given you're one of the many low bandwidth internet users - you wouldn't hesitate to use such a service, i.e. Steam, if you had a much improved connection?

TSb
crafty 22nd August 2011, 15:57 Quote
As others have said: I will stop buying physical copies when they cease to cost LESS than a download from the likes of Steam.
Jipa 22nd August 2011, 16:17 Quote
I haven't had an optical drive for ages. I hate using that obsolete piece of noise-making machinery.

I don't have a super fast connection, but even with 8/1 Mbps connection it really isn't such a pain to download the games I want to play - besides, you only need to do it once. I have my Steam games backed up on another HDD just in case.

Sure, physical copies are nice for presents etc, but I'm not going to miss them when (if) they're gone.

EDIT: Also there's absolutely no way in hell I'm going to pay money for a BR-drive.
Bede 22nd August 2011, 16:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStockBroker
On the contrary though my friend, personally speaking, 15GBs doesn't take more than an hour and a half to download for me - This is much less time than it would take me to get to a brick and mortar store and back home again - and this is something that I can purchase, and subsequently play when I feel bored anytime after 6pm/on a bank holiday/public holiday when the shops are closed, more often then not, it's also cheaper that a brick and mortar store purchase, and equivalent to an internet retailer price - which would take a few days to arrive.

Needless to say, all my games are safely stored together on steam where possible. Software bliss. I'm looking forwards to the Windows 8 'app store' for these very reasons!

TSB

So you live c.40 minutes away from the nearest town, yet still have an amazing internet connection? I am so jealous - we live 10 minutes from the nearest town and have a purely average connection.

I do like Steam, I love the Steam Cloud thing as I play games across 2 PCs, but I dislike their DRM (the offline mode has on several occasions failed to work for me). Even if I had a fibre optic connection, there is still a security in having your games available to install from a disk that I would not like to lose.
TheStockBroker 22nd August 2011, 16:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bede
So you live c.40 minutes away from the nearest town, yet still have an amazing internet connection? I am so jealous - we live 10 minutes from the nearest town and have a purely average connection.

I do like Steam, I love the Steam Cloud thing as I play games across 2 PCs, but I dislike their DRM (the offline mode has on several occasions failed to work for me). Even if I had a fibre optic connection, there is still a security in having your games available to install from a disk that I would not like to lose.

Sort of; live in Central London, have the mid-range VM50Mb package, 100mb isn't available by me for another few months - but for me to get to a 'Game' it will take me 45 minutes in each direction using public transport. The alternative would be to drive, at slightly reduced time, but at the additional cost of fuel, parking, the congestion charge, and time spent sitting in traffic doing nothing other than listening to the radio, makes travelling there even less attractive.
CrazyJoe 22nd August 2011, 16:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStockBroker
The alternative would be to drive, at slightly reduced time, but at the additional cost of fuel, parking, the congestion charge, and time spent sitting in traffic doing nothing other than listening to the radio, makes travelling there even less attractive.

Another alternative is Amazon/Play etc... and it will usually be cheaper than Steam.

What's wrong with waiting a day or two for delivery?
Bede 22nd August 2011, 16:44 Quote
Meh, us modern people like to get things as fast as possible :D London is great, but it's true I have no idea where to find a shop that sells PC games there.
KayinBlack 22nd August 2011, 16:45 Quote
Try living on a connection that has a MONTHLY10 GB cap and see if you still want disks.
mattbailey 22nd August 2011, 16:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayinBlack
Try living on a connection that has a MONTHLY10 GB cap and see if you still want disks.

Join orange broadband. Unlimited downloads, no fair use policy. ;)
walle 22nd August 2011, 16:59 Quote
There is value in physical media, you OWN what you have bought and paid for. You always have access to it, and at any given time.

This is not the case with electronically stored information that you buy.


You will ONLY have access to IT on someone else terms.
CrazyJoe 22nd August 2011, 17:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by walle
There is value in physical media, you OWN what you have bought and paid for. You always have access to it, and at any given time.

This doesn't apply to PC games at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by walle
You will ONLY have access to IT on someone else terms.

This does.
SlowMotionSuicide 22nd August 2011, 17:10 Quote
Quote:
EA: Physical media still has a future

Announcements like these makes me doubt whether the company in question has any.
walle 22nd August 2011, 17:12 Quote
Unless I am misunderstanding you and / or the role of physical media, both apply, surely.
MrJay 22nd August 2011, 17:14 Quote
There are no facts there is only opinion.

For some yes direct download is easy, but for those with piss pore connections its probably quicker to order it off amazon with super saver economy delivery than it is to download a game!

I too like having a physical of a game/dvd/cd makes it more real, gives it substance not to mention quality issues with digital downloads...(not so much for games but think how many times you have waited 10 hours for a client to download only to have a corrupt file at the end of it *Rage*)
CrazyJoe 22nd August 2011, 17:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by walle
Unless I am misunderstanding you and / or the role of physical media, both apply, surely.

Physical PC games nowadays are just for show, all you need is the key in the box and you can play.

Just because you have a copy in your hand doesn't mean you own the game any more than a copy from Steam.
fdbh96 22nd August 2011, 17:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStockBroker
You have to believe me when I say I understand; I do. The state of internet access in the United Kingdom is appalling, as with everything else. But the problem lies with your internet connection, and your ISP. From what you've said though - which I found quite positive, given you're one of the many low bandwidth internet users - you wouldn't hesitate to use such a service, i.e. Steam, if you had a much improved connection?

TSb

This is the only problem for me. I link all my games to steam where possible anyway and would just use this if my Internet connection allowed it. And the fact that parents/relatives give me physical copies for bday and Xmas :)
walle 22nd August 2011, 17:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyJoe
Physical PC games nowadays are just for show, all you need is the key in the box and you can play.

Just because you have a copy in your hand doesn't mean you own the game any more than a copy from Steam.
That's true, for some reason it slipped my mind completely. Thank you for pointing it out.

Cheers. :)
xinaes 22nd August 2011, 17:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStockBroker
The state of internet access in the United Kingdom is appalling, as with everything else.
yeah, if only we were in the Sudan, eh?
TheStockBroker 22nd August 2011, 17:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyJoe
What's wrong with waiting a day or two for delivery?

This is true, there are those tax-loophole savings to be had if you're willing to wait for shipping from Guernsey/Jersey - sadly though, it can be a case of waiting, all the while your co-workers revealing all the juicy titbits, and announcing the best features/parts of the game you've still yet to play!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bede
Meh, us modern people like to get things as fast as possible :D London is great, but it's true I have no idea where to find a shop that sells PC games there.

You've hit the nail on the head! There are Blockbusters and independent game stores all around me, I've got Waitrose, Sainsbury, Tesco, Co-op, Somerfield, Asda, and Morrisons all here within a mile of arms reach, but each only stocks console games. Only Game, and the larger HMVs bother stocking the games for PC, and they unfortunately require some travelling.
Quote:
Originally Posted by xinaes
yeah, if only we were in the Sudan, eh?
Haha, well, perhaps it's more appropriate I say that our internet is appalling given the countries 'developed' status. *grumbles some more*


TSB
CrazyJoe 22nd August 2011, 17:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStockBroker
This is true, there are those tax-loophole savings to be had if you're willing to wait for shipping from Guernsey/Jersey - sadly though, it can be a case of waiting, all the while your co-workers revealing all the juicy titbits, and announcing the best features/parts of the game you've still yet to play!

Plenty of companies will get the game to you before the release date.
Aracos 22nd August 2011, 17:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattbailey
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayinBlack
Try living on a connection that has a MONTHLY10 GB cap and see if you still want disks.

Join orange broadband. Unlimited downloads, no fair use policy. ;)


Lies! Or at least back when I was with them it was lies, their "unlimited" package was only up to an average of 60GB in 2 months, which is ridiculous by any means.
sb1991 22nd August 2011, 19:13 Quote
At least EA can't delete my DVD...
Paradigm Shifter 22nd August 2011, 20:06 Quote
Physical media will always have a place.

Particularly while ISPs seem to think that 10GB/month is generous, or that "unlimited" can mean "~3GB/day then we throttle you like someone who likes auto-erotic asphyxiation".
Arghnews 22nd August 2011, 20:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStockBroker
On the contrary though my friend, personally speaking, 15GBs doesn't take more than an hour and a half to download for me - This is much less time than it would take me to get to a brick and mortar store and back home again - and this is something that I can purchase, and subsequently play when I feel bored anytime after 6pm/on a bank holiday/public holiday when the shops are closed, more often then not, it's also cheaper that a brick and mortar store purchase, and equivalent to an internet retailer price - which would take a few days to arrive.

Needless to say, all my games are safely stored together on steam where possible. Software bliss. I'm looking forwards to the Windows 8 'app store' for these very reasons!

TSB

Well, you're obviously lucky or wealthy enough to afford that aren't you? :(

As has been said, many of us don't have that privelige. If I'm bored after 6pm, I certainly won't go and spend 30 quid to entertain myself, when I could do that for free using the games I already have ^^
ryan498 22nd August 2011, 20:29 Quote
I would always choose software on physical media rather than digital, because if I ever have a hard drive fail then I know I will always have my software on a disk so I wouldn't have to mess around downloading it from the manufacturers website again :)
Arghnews 22nd August 2011, 20:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStockBroker
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyJoe
What's wrong with waiting a day or two for delivery?

This is true, there are those tax-loophole savings to be had if you're willing to wait for shipping from Guernsey/Jersey - sadly though, it can be a case of waiting, all the while your co-workers revealing all the juicy titbits, and announcing the best features/parts of the game you've still yet to play!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bede
Meh, us modern people like to get things as fast as possible :D London is great, but it's true I have no idea where to find a shop that sells PC games there.

You've hit the nail on the head! There are Blockbusters and independent game stores all around me, I've got Waitrose, Sainsbury, Tesco, Co-op, Somerfield, Asda, and Morrisons all here within a mile of arms reach, but each only stocks console games. Only Game, and the larger HMVs bother stocking the games for PC, and they unfortunately require some travelling.
Quote:
Originally Posted by xinaes
yeah, if only we were in the Sudan, eh?
Haha, well, perhaps it's more appropriate I say that our internet is appalling given the countries 'developed' status. *grumbles some more*


TSB


I'm sorry, but your first reply is so pathetic, I almost want to vomit. Learn to wait some time for things, just because your "friends" are all flashing how far they've got in the latest CoD campaign in your face, doesn't mean you should feel a desire to get the bloody game faster. To be frank, I'd focus on getting some better friends ^^
I happily wait for an extra week by using free delivery from online sites, as do the majority of financially conscious, competent people.
Spose when you have, what was it you said, 50Mb/sec DL, speed comes before cost on the list of priorities, but don't expect most people to follow your rich git view.

As the guy sad, have you ever tried Amazon?...
SMIFFYDUDE 22nd August 2011, 22:29 Quote
^ Calm down comrade
Bede 22nd August 2011, 22:32 Quote
^^ In Soviet Britain..
John_T 22nd August 2011, 22:43 Quote
Well I must say that I'm slightly confused as to why a stockbroker living in central London can't find anywhere to buy PC games, would even contemplate using public transport for a 45 minute journey (to anywhere), and would give two sh**s about how much petrol it would cost to get somewhere (in door-to-door comfort) in about 15 minutes, when public transport would take 45.

Baffling.

I spent years working in & around the Square Mile & there were tons of places to buy games - because strangely enough, people who earn good money quite like spending it too. The West End & Oxford Street is only, what, 15-20 mins on the Central Line from Liverpool Street? (Tops). Also, if based in Canary Wharf, then try the shopping centre underneath it, down the escalators at Canada Square & head towards Waitrose - low & behold, game shop on the right.

It can't be that hard surely? Why all the trekking to the outer boroughs? I lived in zone two for several years and pretty much the only time I had to break the threshold of zone three was to either visit people or go to the airport & venture off to foreign parts.

Also slightly confused as to the link some people have between having cable and being rich. Cable is for the most part laid in densely populated areas, hence generally poorer areas like Whitechapel & Bethnal Green will have super-whizzy quick access available, while many of the more exclusive outer boroughs and outlying commuter hinterlands & their trophy homes will, for the large part, be ADSL. (Often right at the bottom end of it too).

Anyway, physical media will be sold for as long as there are people willing to buy it. For many people, as stated by Jens Uwe Intat and backed up by many here, the idea of being able to hold a tangible, physical object in their hand is attractive. It 'proves' ownership and is its own, ready made backup device.
dark_avenger 23rd August 2011, 01:07 Quote
Only game I have bought on media in the last ~3 years was black ops and that was only because I got it for ~$35 cheaper than steam had it for.

I then came home installed it on steam and the disc is collecting dust in a cupboard somewhere.

There seems to be a lot of fear that steam will disappear in the future and you won't have access to your games. While possible based on the amount of money valve make from the service I don't see it happening anytime soon.
slothy89 23rd August 2011, 04:31 Quote
I'd buy physical media for games that are AU$40+ I'm not spending large sums on something that steam may decide to stop hosting. AA Titles I get a physical disc, indie games or just games on sale, sure I'll DL from steam (even if it is 15+GB) might take 2 days, but $10 on sale on steam is better than the $50 you still pay retail :p
rogerrabbits 23rd August 2011, 05:24 Quote
I have absolutely no preference. There are pros and cons of both ways and they make each other about equal to me.
play_boy_2000 23rd August 2011, 06:56 Quote
I havn't had a dvd/cd-rom drive in my computer for almost 4 years now. I do have a external USB drive, but it's rarely powered on. I think that flash drives might overtake DVD in the next ~5 years, not because the medium is cheaper, but because the shipping costs will be almost nothing.
Telltale Boy 23rd August 2011, 08:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStockBroker
You have to believe me when I say I understand; I do. The state of internet access in the United Kingdom is appalling, as with everything else. But the problem lies with your internet connection, and your ISP. From what you've said though - which I found quite positive, given you're one of the many low bandwidth internet users - you wouldn't hesitate to use such a service, i.e. Steam, if you had a much improved connection?

TSb

Don't worry I wasn't trying to have a go at you, I was just being a bit overly dramatic. :D

It's not that I don't use Steam, it's just that I do feel the convenience of physical media. In fact I own over 90 Steam games and have about 35 installed; checking my hard drive now the Steamapps folder takes up 192GB.
liratheal 23rd August 2011, 10:07 Quote
I love the smell of manuals in physical copies.
TheStockBroker 23rd August 2011, 10:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arghnews
Well, you're obviously lucky or wealthy enough to afford that aren't you? :(

As has been said, many of us don't have that privelige. If I'm bored after 6pm, I certainly won't go and spend 30 quid to entertain myself, when I could do that for free using the games I already have ^^

Not really, as a long standing Virgin customer, after trying to close my account when moving house; I was offered the 50Mb package at my new place for £23pm. That's only a little more than one of the few truly unlimited ADSL2+ offerings from BE (not including line rental, then adsl will cost more!), which would net me at the very best less than half the speed. Or perhaps, if you were referring to the games, then no, that's definitely not what I do! I was just highlighting the convenience of digital delivery - as there have been times when I've made plans for Friday night, only to have friends flake out on me, leaving me at home with nothing on TV...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arghnews
I'm sorry, but your first reply is so pathetic, I almost want to vomit. Learn to wait some time for things, just because your "friends" are all flashing how far they've got in the latest CoD campaign in your face, doesn't mean you should feel a desire to get the bloody game faster. To be frank, I'd focus on getting some better friends ^^
I happily wait for an extra week by using free delivery from online sites, as do the majority of financially conscious, competent people.
Spose when you have, what was it you said, 50Mb/sec DL, speed comes before cost on the list of priorities, but don't expect most people to follow your rich git view.

As the guy sad, have you ever tried Amazon?...

Whoa, take it easy! I think you misunderstood what I was saying. They're not my friends, as I said, they're colleagues - if I'm at work sitting at my desk on the phone with a customer/client and persons xxx and yyy (one of whom is always the director above me) are busy revealing the whole plot of zzz rpg within earshot, it sometimes can't be avoided.

I don't just buy games so I can hole-up at home alone, there is also a social element in it for me, one of which is to be able to engage in a bit of water-cooler game-talk with my colleagues about such & such strategy or fight, or what I enjoyed or thought was implemented really well.
Being a few days behind, as has happened when ordering online - even if this is just because I get stuck not being able to pick up my delivery from the post/sorting office until the weekend, means that I've games at home which I've just never played, because I've either heard everything about it, or heard it was mediocre, or buggy, or otherwise not worth my time etc.
There are also times, when I'll buy a day-after-release-day game purely on recommendation from one of said colleagues, waiting a few days for delivery might just lead back to the above point.

Rich git view, really? I pay less for my internet connection than a bottom end BT ADSL capped connection + line rental, and perhaps £2-3 more per game in some cases which I can then enjoy actually playing with, and talking about to friends.
Id' even go so far as to say steam ultimately actually saves me money against the otherwise inevitable purchases if I were to stroll down Oxford Street or go on Amazon.
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_T
Well I must say that I'm slightly confused as to why a stockbroker living in central London can't find anywhere to buy PC games, would even contemplate using public transport for a 45 minute journey (to anywhere), and would give two sh**s about how much petrol it would cost to get somewhere (in door-to-door comfort) in about 15 minutes, when public transport would take 45.

<snip>

Also slightly confused as to the link some people have between having cable and being rich. Cable is for the most part laid in densely populated areas, hence generally poorer areas like Whitechapel & Bethnal Green will have super-whizzy quick access available, while many of the more exclusive outer boroughs and outlying commuter hinterlands & their trophy homes will, for the large part, be ADSL. (Often right at the bottom end of it too). <Snip>

Haha, I'm no more a broker (of any sorts) than the 'Dark Avenger' commenting below you is actually Batman or Dexter. Nor, unfortunately, am I loaded. Yes, there are plenty of places near my office where I could buy a physical copy of a game, but none near my home, which is what the travel times stated were for - essentially my normal commute time + 10 minutes to get to a store.

Ultimately though, the point I was trying to make is that for me, the simplicity of *click**click**click* *cliiiiiiiick* *download* for a Londoner with cable or ADSL2+ was far more appealing than trekking any amount of distance, be it 5 minutes away or an hour to get a physical copy.

Your comment about cable is appreciated though, I see from this thread it's perceived as an unobtainable luxury, whereas you're quite right in pointing out it's a faster, yet equivalent priced alternative to ADSL where available, and nothing more.

TSB
V3ctor 23rd August 2011, 10:54 Quote
I have 400gb in Steam games... but I still buy physical copies. Last month I bought Crysis 2 and NFS Shift2 from Amazon with 40% discount. I love that super delivery thing. I dont remember the last time I went to a pcgames/pc's stores...
kylew 23rd August 2011, 11:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by walle
There is value in physical media, you OWN what you have bought and paid for. You always have access to it, and at any given time.

This is not the case with electronically stored information that you buy.


You will ONLY have access to IT on someone else terms.


What about ISOs you've ripped of your games? How about games from GOG.com?

They're both electronically stored and accessible on your own terms at all times.
kylew 23rd August 2011, 11:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arghnews
I'm sorry, but your first reply is so pathetic, I almost want to vomit. Learn to wait some time for things, just because your "friends" are all flashing how far they've got in the latest CoD campaign in your face, doesn't mean you should feel a desire to get the bloody game faster. To be frank, I'd focus on getting some better friends ^^
I happily wait for an extra week by using free delivery from online sites, as do the majority of financially conscious, competent people.
Spose when you have, what was it you said, 50Mb/sec DL, speed comes before cost on the list of priorities, but don't expect most people to follow your rich git view.

As the guy sad, have you ever tried Amazon?...


You don't sound bitter and jealous at all, what a perfectly normal, well thought out and reasoned response you have going there, good job!
AstralWanderer 23rd August 2011, 12:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylew
What about ISOs you've ripped of your games? How about games from GOG.com?

They're both electronically stored and accessible on your own terms at all times.
GOG is certainly the standout here - a digital distributor that doesn't lock your purchases down and doesn't have the ability to disable your games collection. Sadly (aside from DotEmu and specialist distributors like GamersFront) they are an exception.

ISOs aren't the same though, assuming you mean a copy of previously purchased content. They will be subject to the same controls as the physical media. Specifically if the game in question employed any form of online activation, then you're back to square one in terms of control.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parge
Price wise, yes, physical copies are cheaper (though they shouldn't be!) - the second this changes - It'll be all over for physical media for me.
It is this point that has me puzzled about those arguing in favour of digital distribution in this thread. Yes it can be a lot cheaper but it isn't - even on release, games can typically cheaper from the likes of Amazon or Play.com and given the significant cost savings of digital (no CD/manual to manufacture, no inventory, storage, transport and damaged returns costs, no retailer margins) it is a disgrace to see digital copies being priced as high as they are - and a damning indictment on anyone supporting such high-handed behaviour by buying anyway.

And before people jump in with "Steam sales - woot!" comments, may I point out that those 70-90% discounts are still profitable for Valve, which means you're being overcharged by at least that amount. In addition, such sales tend to be for older games - whose physical copies (if still available) are also heavily discounted, and not for just a single weekend.

The topic of digital vs physical is not a new one here - previous Bit-Tech articles (like Digi distribution destroys old pricing models or The Downside to Digital Distribution) have covered similar points. Until digital pricing reflects the savings made by producers and until more stores follow GOG's example in treating purchasers as customers and not digital slaves, then physical media will continue to have a role.
kylew 23rd August 2011, 13:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylew
What about ISOs you've ripped of your games? How about games from GOG.com?

They're both electronically stored and accessible on your own terms at all times.
GOG is certainly the standout here - a digital distributor that doesn't lock your purchases down and doesn't have the ability to disable your games collection. Sadly (aside from DotEmu and specialist distributors like GamersFront) they are an exception.

ISOs aren't the same though, assuming you mean a copy of previously purchased content. They will be subject to the same controls as the physical media. Specifically if the game in question employed any form of online activation, then you're back to square one in terms of control.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parge
Price wise, yes, physical copies are cheaper (though they shouldn't be!) - the second this changes - It'll be all over for physical media for me.
It is this point that has me puzzled about those arguing in favour of digital distribution in this thread. Yes it can be a lot cheaper but it isn't - even on release, games can typically cheaper from the likes of Amazon or Play.com and given the significant cost savings of digital (no CD/manual to manufacture, no inventory, storage, transport and damaged returns costs, no retailer margins) it is a disgrace to see digital copies being priced as high as they are - and a damning indictment on anyone supporting such high-handed behaviour by buying anyway.

And before people jump in with "Steam sales - woot!" comments, may I point out that those 70-90% discounts are still profitable for Valve, which means you're being overcharged by at least that amount. In addition, such sales tend to be for older games - whose physical copies (if still available) are also heavily discounted, and not for just a single weekend.

The topic of digital vs physical is not a new one here - previous Bit-Tech articles (like Digi distribution destroys old pricing models or The Downside to Digital Distribution) have covered similar points. Until digital pricing reflects the savings made by producers and until more stores follow GOG's example in treating purchasers as customers and not digital slaves, then physical media will continue to have a role.

That's what "no CD" patches and cracks are for. :P

It means I can do what I want when I want with my stuff. I don't care if they claim I don't "own" the game.

I do agree with you though on the subject of the cost of digital distributed games. They really do need to be less than boxed copies. However, about the Steam sales, it seems like you see it as a problem that even with big discounts it's still profitable, isn't that the point in their Steam Distribution side of their business?

When Steam do sales like that, they have a deal with the developers to discount the games, it's not them simply dropping their profit margin right down. Valve take about 30% of selling price of a game on Steam, I'd imagine it'd be the same in the sales, so a game that's say £3 at 70% off will me making valve roughly £1 and the developers £2. Don't forget, a digital copy of a game costs nothing to produce, it's just a copy. There's no box or pressed disc or anything that incurs third party costs except for Valve's margin, and then what it costs Valve for their infrastructure and bandwith.
Bakes 23rd August 2011, 17:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by AstralWanderer
ISOs aren't the same though, assuming you mean a copy of previously purchased content. They will be subject to the same controls as the physical media. Specifically if the game in question employed any form of online activation, then you're back to square one in terms of control
Which implies that you've lost nothing by using digital instead of physical?
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parge
Price wise, yes, physical copies are cheaper (though they shouldn't be!) - the second this changes - It'll be all over for physical media for me.
It is this point that has me puzzled about those arguing in favour of digital distribution in this thread. Yes it can be a lot cheaper but it isn't - even on release, games can typically cheaper from the likes of Amazon or Play.com and given the significant cost savings of digital (no CD/manual to manufacture, no inventory, storage, transport and damaged returns costs, no retailer margins) it is a disgrace to see digital copies being priced as high as they are - and a damning indictment on anyone supporting such high-handed behaviour by buying anyway.

And before people jump in with "Steam sales - woot!" comments, may I point out that those 70-90% discounts are still profitable for Valve, which means you're being overcharged by at least that amount. In addition, such sales tend to be for older games - whose physical copies (if still available) are also heavily discounted, and not for just a single weekend.

The topic of digital vs physical is not a new one here - previous Bit-Tech articles (like Digi distribution destroys old pricing models or The Downside to Digital Distribution) have covered similar points. Until digital pricing reflects the savings made by producers and until more stores follow GOG's example in treating purchasers as customers and not digital slaves, then physical media will continue to have a role.

It's a lot cheaper to distribute digital games, true - but the price of producing a physical game is low to start with (it's about £1-2 to the home).
Skiddywinks 24th August 2011, 04:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattbailey
Quote:
Originally Posted by KayinBlack
Try living on a connection that has a MONTHLY10 GB cap and see if you still want disks.

Join orange broadband. Unlimited downloads, no fair use policy. ;)

WRONG.

There is a FUP (or at least there was last I checked), and I have been contacted on two occasions for breaching it. They even capped my peak time speeds. Never even checked to see if they got lifted. Couldn't even play games during the day. Now I am usually in work in the day so can't really say for sure.
AstralWanderer 24th August 2011, 05:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylew
I do agree with you though on the subject of the cost of digital distributed games. They really do need to be less than boxed copies. However, about the Steam sales, it seems like you see it as a problem that even with big discounts it's still profitable, isn't that the point in their Steam Distribution side of their business?
It isn't that sales exist or that they are profitable - that applies with most other online (and offline) retailers. It when you see massive discounts (70-90%) being applied, which shows how great a profit is being made with normal prices.

How the developer or distributor shares that profit is secondary in my view (though Amazon charges about 17% to marketplace vendors for listing, order and payment processing, making Steam's 30% for essentially the same looking poor value) but having pricing set at levels few physical retailers would charge is taking the mick.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes
Which implies that you've lost nothing by using digital instead of physical?
If the physical copies require online activation then yes, without cracks they're as perishable as DRMed digital versions.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes
It's a lot cheaper to distribute digital games, true - but the price of producing a physical game is low to start with (it's about £1-2 to the home).
Postage alone would be nearly as much, and you have other costs with physical media - warehousing and other storage, inventory management in ordering new pressings when stocks run low and dealing with damaged returns, plus retailer margins which can be much higher (over 50% with high street stores according to a 1C Publishing interview).
BioSniper 24th August 2011, 07:43 Quote
I buy whatever is cheaper but prefer a download if I can get one. But I am lucky to live in a Virgin Media cabled area and have 50MB.
If my situation was different I'm sure I would buy more physical copies.

The problem we have is that broadband is just not up to scratch in every area, so until it is, physical media will need to continue and have a presence. The high street retailer though, I think has their days numbered due to pricing.
Omnituens 24th August 2011, 08:36 Quote
I still buy physical copies... if it integrates into Steam.
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums