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Sony Online Entertainment compromised too

Sony Online Entertainment compromised too

Sony has confirmed that SOE's site, Station.com, has been compromised too.

Sony has admitted that Sony Online Entertainment, which manages Sony's online games across PC and PlayStation 3, has been affected by the previous attacks on the PlayStation Network.

Sony has also clarified that SOE has not come under a new attack, but that the information has only come to light in the last 48 hours. More than 24.6 million accounts on Station.com - Sony's hub for online games such as DC Universe, Freerealms and Everquest 2 - have been compromised, across both PS3 and PC.

Sony doesn't believe that the primary credit card database has been accessed, but has discovered evidence that an older database of non-US customers has been - a fact which directly affects 12,700 customers.

'Stolen information includes, to the extent you provided it to us, the following: name, address (city, state, zip, country), email address, gender, birthdate, phone number, login name and hashed password,' says the Sony statement.

'Customers outside the United States should be advised that we further discovered evidence that information from an outdated database from 2007 containing approximately 12,700 non-US customer credit or debit card numbers and expiration dates (but not credit card security codes) and about 10,700 direct debit records listing bank account numbers of certain customers in Germany, Austria, Netherlands and Spain may have also been obtained - we will be notifying each of those customers promptly.'

Sony has taken all SOE game services offline for the moment and is working to contact customers directly, while also upping security.

Let us know your thoughts in the forums.

49 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
SaNdCrAwLeR 3rd May 2011, 11:33 Quote
I never thought sony was this bad at security...
did they ever even think about encrypting this stuff?
Senilex 3rd May 2011, 11:48 Quote
Here is the customer service notification: http://www.soe.com/securityupdate/

Here is the press release: http://www.soe.com/securityupdate/pressrelease.vm
DriftCarl 3rd May 2011, 11:50 Quote
so no one can play any sony MMO's at the moment?
This sort of thing can bring a company down. I am sure there are more than a few guys looking for jobs in Japan right now.
I actually got an email today from sony apologising, it was sent to my old SWG account email address.
liratheal 3rd May 2011, 12:03 Quote
I think the ball has been dropped, shot, and then dropped again.

Good job, Sony!
impar 3rd May 2011, 12:54 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by liratheal
Good job, Sony!
Why blame Sony and not the criminals?
will_123 3rd May 2011, 13:00 Quote
Why because when they take on the responsibilities of peoples details then they should be able to keep them safe. And simply they have not. Hackers could have anything just now Sony don't have a clue what they have taken everyday they seem to find out more and more has been compromised. They are just fumbling around in the dark.
impar 3rd May 2011, 13:02 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by will_123
Why because when they take on the responsibilities of peoples details then they should be able to keep them safe.
So the fault\blame lies entirely on Sony?
will_123 3rd May 2011, 13:07 Quote
This has not affected me but imo if a company takes my details and loses them then yes. I don't care how,who where or why. I am going to hold that company responsible. i hope they lose alot of buisness from this as i cant be acceptable for company to get away with leaking peoples details. I worked in the bank dealing with fraud and I know how it can affect people's lives. It can cripple people. Sony need to take the blame for this as it was their fault.
leveller 3rd May 2011, 13:08 Quote
Greetings impar!

Yes it does. If there is nothing to blame Sony for then the details would still be safe and secure!
Tokukachi 3rd May 2011, 13:13 Quote
Dammit, that's my details potentially stolen twice then.. .

Given that the SoE network will have been separate from the PSN I'm being to think this was an inside job.
impar 3rd May 2011, 13:14 Quote
Greetings!

Ok, I now live in a parallel world where criminals are not to blame for the crimes they commit. :(
Jim 3rd May 2011, 13:28 Quote
Of course the criminals are to blame, but it's really besides the point.

If a prisoner wandered out of his unlocked cell, unlocked prison, and then proceeded to murder some of your friends or relatives, would you not hold the prison somewhat responsible?
will_123 3rd May 2011, 13:32 Quote
No you don't. By all means these criminals should feel the wrath of the law. But it seems these are invisible criminals who walked in through Sony's security and made of with what they wanted....

Don't know about you but I would be angry if I was one of the people whose details was stolen and I know who I would be blaming.
Cei 3rd May 2011, 13:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Greetings!

Ok, I now live in a parallel world where criminals are not to blame for the crimes they commit. :(

I'd say it's a mix of blame. The hackers are scum of the earth, but equally Sony should have protected their data a bit better.
HD6950 P5430 3rd May 2011, 13:43 Quote
The mystery team pulls the mask of Sony:

"if it weren't for those meddling kids!"
themax 3rd May 2011, 13:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by snootyjim
Of course the criminals are to blame, but it's really besides the point.

If a prisoner wandered out of his unlocked cell, unlocked prison, and then proceeded to murder some of your friends or relatives, would you not hold the prison somewhat responsible?

It's besides the point? If a prisoner uses a new method that prison officials are not aware then how can it be their fault for not knowing? At that point the method is noted and measures are taken to ensure it doesn't happen again. I'm no security expert but IMO Security is reactive at best. This isn't the Minority Report and the sudden standard of "They should know before it happens" is kind of out there. Network security cannot be 100% pro-active because too many vulnerabilities exists and hacker's are always one step ahead. This doesn't absolve Sony of any responsibility because it was their job to protect our data, but you can't seriously say this was Sony's fault for being targeted by a criminal entity.
leveller 3rd May 2011, 13:53 Quote
Greetings impar!

The prison idea above is spot on. If a company takes our payment details, then we expect those details to remain safe, always. That is Sony's responsibility. And they failed. It IS their fault. If you are saying that there are no security measures on this earth that can offer that kind of protection then that is different and I'm not a security expert.
Cei 3rd May 2011, 13:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by themax
It's besides the point? If a prisoner uses a new method that prison officials are not aware then how can it be their fault for not knowing? At that point the method is noted and measures are taken to ensure it doesn't happen again. I'm no security expert but IMO Security is reactive at best. This isn't the Minority Report and the sudden standard of "They should know before it happens" is kind of out there. Network security cannot be 100% pro-active because too many vulnerabilities exists and hacker's are always one step ahead. This doesn't absolve Sony of any responsibility because it was their job to protect our data, but you can't seriously say this was Sony's fault for being targeted by a criminal entity.

I somewhat agree, but in Sony's case it's more like that they forgot some of the basics. The prison walls were tall and manned, and the guards checked everybody at the gates, but they forgot to lock the cells and take away the shovels. The hack that got through the network is something they can't predict, and as you said, shouldn't be penalised for, but the unencryption of passwords etc is such a basic error that speaks of a flawed system.

Encryption isn't new, it's not an unknown technique, so they should have used it.
will_123 3rd May 2011, 14:08 Quote
Quote:
The hack that got through the network is something they can't predict, and as you said, shouldn't be penalised for

I see what you are all saying. I just feel that once a company has my details, if its doesn't keep them safe then I hold them responsible. Not to encrypt sensitive details is inexcusable imo.
Quote:
Of course the criminals are to blame, but it's really besides the point.

If a prisoner wandered out of his unlocked cell, unlocked prison, and then proceeded to murder some of your friends or relatives, would you not hold the prison somewhat responsible?

Couldn't agree more.
Lenderz 3rd May 2011, 14:09 Quote
Seems that Sony is securing customer data with "Security Through Obscurity" thats 100 million records hacked, why would they steal my identity when they've got 99,999,999 other peoples to steal eh.
steveo_mcg 3rd May 2011, 14:12 Quote
As nexxo would remind us blame is not a zero sum game, Sony can be at fault as can the hackers. Sony should have taken (more) steps to protect our data, I doubt the DPA directly applies but the principles stand. If Sony want to hold our data Sony must hold it securely as it is patently obvious that criminals want our data. If Sony are not up to holding the data in a secure fashion they shouldn't.
sandys 3rd May 2011, 14:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cei
Encryption isn't new, it's not an unknown technique, so they should have used it.

Whilst they were not encrypted they were not plain text as some articles seem to suggest, they use hashing like you might on a forum for example.

no matter the security if some one wants to break in and is determined enough it'll probably happen eventually. Sonys system was secure for a number of years,
leveller 3rd May 2011, 14:28 Quote
Which brings me to a question for you all. Is MySQL tables, PHP pages, HTML, XML, Flash, Java, Javascript (add as many as you like) - always breakable? Are there any web network servers that are 100% unbreakable?
Guinevere 3rd May 2011, 14:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by leveller
Which brings me to a question for you all. Is MySQL tables, PHP pages, HTML, XML, Flash, Java, Javascript (add as many as you like) - always breakable? Are there any web network servers that are 100% unbreakable?

Yes, any of them are 100% unbreakable if configured correctly and kept up to date. It's really easy put up a secure web system, but it gets real complicated real fast when you start adding in multiple layers of access etc.

They should have protected the personal date better. Not encrypted? Simple hashed passwords?

School boy errors Sony. Consider your wrist well and truly slapped.
Woodspoon 3rd May 2011, 15:12 Quote
They bitch and complain about piracy yet they cant keep our data secure.
I'm sure like many people I've never read it but surely there must be something in the EULA about this sort of thing and them having to do as much as possible to protect our data and if there isn't there bloody well should be!
Data protection works both ways,
leveller 3rd May 2011, 15:31 Quote
This has nothing to do with piracy ... if you want excuses to be pirating then just be honest and say you're skint. Or you're a thief.
chelseascum 3rd May 2011, 15:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DriftCarl
so no one can play any sony MMO's at the moment?
This sort of thing can bring a company down. I am sure there are more than a few guys looking for jobs in Japan right now.
I actually got an email today from sony apologising, it was sent to my old SWG account email address.

I didn't yet, and I would have been on the same database as an SWG subscriber in 2007.
Woodspoon 3rd May 2011, 16:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by leveller
This has nothing to do with piracy ... if you want excuses to be pirating then just be honest and say you're skint. Or you're a thief.

Lol, I'll admit in years gone past I have, but for the last few years everything's been brought, I make no excuses.
Piracy isn't theft anyway, it's copying without permission, theft involves taking the original, but thats a whole different argument.
My point was that Sony bitch and whine about piracy and unsolicited sharing of THEIR data yet they can't keep our data secure and don't appear to do much of job even trying to keep it secure, like encrypting as much as possible.
leveller 3rd May 2011, 16:40 Quote
This is why I asked the security question earlier. My hopes of safe online shopping/gaming are feeling more and more shattered (Sony also had my details for SOE, as well as PSN).

At some point I want to take secure payments in a project, have users create accounts ... if Sony can't do it ...
Waynio 3rd May 2011, 17:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Greetings!

Why blame Sony and not the criminals?

Agreed, sony are getting hit hard, some group must really want to killl off sony, not good.

Also sony may have had top notch security but the hackers could be so good at what they do are able to bypass any security, this is what I think.
Manu_Otaku 3rd May 2011, 17:39 Quote
Seeing Previous comments, IMHO makes me realize that people are forgetting that Geo did divulge the key to the open world, sony is responsible for that i will explain later, but it is also responsible for no taking the necessary messures and steps in order to avoid an attack as soon as they did find out this, thats unaceptable at least they shoul rebuild their system prior the hacker attack and/or tight up the security making all the information harder to access with encryptions, separeted systems etc, in my eyes this gives me a clear perspective of how we users mind to sony.

Therefore lets not forget that what geo did was because of the took of other s, this gave him the reason or excuse if you want to do it, and thats why iss sonys responsability too, because this was a feature that came with the product and it was advertised that will last till all its lifecycle, therefore for me sony is responsable for all the PSN situation because they didnt handle anything right, its a series of linked mistakes in sonys front, the only good thing they did was to shutdown the PSN as soon as the find the intrusion , however they didnt divulge the news about the situation to their users only a week before that, and that could have harmed the users more than one might think, and thats also why a vast number of users are a little bit unpleased with sony, and rightfully so.
impar 3rd May 2011, 19:42 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manu_Otaku
Therefore lets not forget that what geo did was because of the took of other s, this gave him the reason or excuse if you want to do it, ...
Assuming you meant "OtherOS" when you wrote "other s", Geohot released his first hack on January 2010, for it to work it needed OtherOS functionality, Sony then proceeded to remove Other OS functionality on April 2010.
Geohot actions were not provoked by the removal of OtherOS, Sonys choice to defend its system from Geohots attack was what removed OtherOS from the console.

Another occasion where Sony is being solely blamed while the crackers\hackers are seen as heroes. :(
steveo_mcg 3rd May 2011, 21:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Greetings!

Assuming you meant "OtherOS" when you wrote "other s", Geohot released his first hack on January 2010, for it to work it needed OtherOS functionality, Sony then proceeded to remove Other OS functionality on April 2010.
Geohot actions were not provoked by the removal of OtherOS, Sonys choice to defend its system from Geohots attack was what removed OtherOS from the console.

Another occasion where Sony is being solely blamed while the crackers\hackers are seen as heroes. :(

At the direct expense of its paying customers. Again blame is not a zero sum game Sony acted very poorly in this example.

You seem to want to exonerate Sony's actions by saying they were forced to withdraw this service, they weren't forced they chose to remove the OtherOs to protect a revenue stream at the expense of people who had already paid and had little recourse.
impar 4th May 2011, 00:34 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveo_mcg
You seem to want to exonerate Sony's actions by saying they were forced to withdraw this service, they weren't forced they chose to remove the OtherOs to protect a revenue stream...
... as any other sane company would.

I really would like to know how many PS3 users ever tried the OtherOS. 2% of the entire user base? 1%? Less than that?
jimmyjj 4th May 2011, 00:38 Quote
If they can crack Sony they can crack a lot of other big operations.

Sony may have made some bad errors in their security, but I bet there are a lot of big companies whose security is no better.

Frankly it is really worrying.

I hope there are government investigations, that lessons are learnt and that tougher legislation is put in place to make companies more responsible.

Remember we are talking about a company that makes BILLIONS, holding the details of MILLIONS of people. It is almost impossible to believe they could get boned like this.

One day I would like to hear the full story, could make a good book or a film.
Lazarus Dark 4th May 2011, 04:32 Quote
"If they can crack Sony they can crack a lot of other big operations.

Sony may have made some bad errors in their security, but I bet there are a lot of big companies whose security is no better"
Maybe, but probably those other companies didnt go pissing off the hacker community. It's Sony's fault for not locking that junk down, but it's MORE their fault for being evil douchbags and pissing off the hacker community, which is an INVITATION to get hacked. If Sony had not been such douchbags, they would not have drawn the attention of the hackers in the first place. So I say it is COMPLETELY Sony's fault, in the same way that if you kick a dog, its your own fault if he turns around and bites you. They asked for it, and they obviously had no regard for their customers in the process.
Waynio 4th May 2011, 08:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazarus Dark
"If they can crack Sony they can crack a lot of other big operations.

Sony may have made some bad errors in their security, but I bet there are a lot of big companies whose security is no better"
Maybe, but probably those other companies didnt go pissing off the hacker community. It's Sony's fault for not locking that junk down, but it's MORE their fault for being evil douchbags and pissing off the hacker community, which is an INVITATION to get hacked. If Sony had not been such douchbags, they would not have drawn the attention of the hackers in the first place. So I say it is COMPLETELY Sony's fault, in the same way that if you kick a dog, its your own fault if he turns around and bites you. They asked for it, and they obviously had no regard for their customers in the process.

Can not disagree with that.
ObeyTheCreed 4th May 2011, 08:41 Quote
If i was Sony i would've had that database locked up behind encryptions, about 50 firewalls, with daily scans and a team of people watching the incoming traffic. There is no excuse why their database was compromised, no self-respecting big business should ever give any reason for a customer to be afraid of losing his or her information. I have a friend of mine who has encryptions covering every folder and hard drive on his computer, and even a boot encryption to were you can't even get passed bios without entering the correct password. My point is, these people make billions of money per year off of their customers and they don't even have state-of-the-art encryption services for their customers?
steveo_mcg 4th May 2011, 10:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Greetings!

... as any other sane company would.

I really would like to know how many PS3 users ever tried the OtherOS. 2% of the entire user base? 1%? Less than that?

So all sane companies can act at the expense of consumers, thank goodness for consumer protection laws...

I'd like to know how many Excel users use the database access functions built in, probably less than 2% but i'd still be annoyed if they removed them... What is your point?
impar 4th May 2011, 11:25 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveo_mcg
So all sane companies can act at the expense of consumers, thank goodness for consumer protection laws...
I really like consumer protection laws. 2 years warranty, a month RMA time, a trial period, ... I think I have used all of those at least once.
Sony was trialed by that in the USA. How is the appeal going?
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveo_mcg
I'd like to know how many Excel users use the database access functions built in, probably less than 2% but i'd still be annoyed if they removed them... What is your point?
More than 2%. Database work done in Excel is part of the basic skills of Excel. Everybody with a formal training in Excel has used it.
My point is that if OtherOS was widely used by the PS3 community, Sony wouldnt dare to remove it. And probably if it wasnt initially needed for the hacks to work, very few would notice its absence.
steveo_mcg 4th May 2011, 11:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Greetings!

I really like consumer protection laws. 2 years warranty, a month RMA time, a trial period, ... I think I have used all of those at least once.
Sony was trialed by that in the USA. How is the appeal going?

but if sane companies could do as they pleased none of these benefits would exist they are hardly in the best interests of the company.
Quote:

More than 2%. Database work done in Excel is part of the basic skills of Excel. Everybody with a formal training in Excel has used it.
My point is that if OtherOS was widely used by the PS3 community, Sony wouldnt dare to remove it. And probably if it wasnt initially needed for the hacks to work, very few would notice its absence.
I think you massively overestimate the level of training of Excel users. Round here the majority of users struggle with vlookups. ;)

My point is that it was a feature, a selling point, an item that was paid for whether it was used by the majority is irrelevant. They pulled the rug out and there is no recourse for the user who did utilise these features.
impar 4th May 2011, 11:39 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveo_mcg
They pulled the rug out and there is no recourse for the user who did utilise these features.
The appeals are still going.
GiantStickMan 4th May 2011, 12:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazarus Dark
Maybe, but probably those other companies didnt go pissing off the hacker community. It's Sony's fault for not locking that junk down, but it's MORE their fault for being evil douchbags and pissing off the hacker community, which is an INVITATION to get hacked. If Sony had not been such douchbags, they would not have drawn the attention of the hackers in the first place. So I say it is COMPLETELY Sony's fault, in the same way that if you kick a dog, its your own fault if he turns around and bites you. They asked for it, and they obviously had no regard for their customers in the process.

I cannot disagree with you more. You are glorifying the actions of hackers who have compromised personal and potentially financial details. I am one of those people. I agree that Sony should have locked down the information better, a part of the blame does sit with them, but i will never sympathise with the hackers. This wasn't an attack on Sony, it was an attack on their customers. Whatever you think they 'deserved' it's their customer base who has suffered.
leveller 4th May 2011, 12:46 Quote
So, I've just received the dreaded (other) email ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOE
Dear Valued Sony Online Entertainment Customer:
Our ongoing investigation of illegal intrusions into Sony Online Entertainment systems has discovered that hackers may have obtained personal customer information from SOE systems. We are today advising you that the personal information you provided us in connection with your SOE account may have been stolen in a cyber-attack. Stolen information includes, to the extent you provided it to us, the following: name, address (city, state, zip, country), email address, gender, birthdate, phone number, login name and hashed password. Customers outside the United States should be advised that we further discovered evidence that information from an outdated database from 2007 containing approximately 12,700 non-US customer credit or debit card numbers and expiration dates (but not credit card security codes) – we will be notifying each of those customers promptly.

There is no evidence that our main credit card database was compromised. It is in a completely separate and secured environment.

We had previously believed that SOE customer data had not been obtained in the cyber-attacks on the company, but on May 1st we concluded that SOE account information may have been stolen and we are notifying you as soon as possible.

We apologize for the inconvenience caused by the attack and as a result, we have:
1. Temporarily turned off all SOE game services;
2. Engaged an outside, recognized security firm to conduct a full and complete investigation into what happened; and
3. Quickly taken steps to enhance security and strengthen our network infrastructure to provide you with greater protection of your personal information.

We greatly appreciate your patience, understanding and goodwill as we do whatever it takes to resolve these issues as quickly and efficiently as practicable.

For your security, we encourage you to be especially aware of email, telephone, and postal mail scams that ask for personal or sensitive information. Sony will not contact you in any way, including by email, asking for your credit card number, social security number or other personally identifiable information. If you are asked for this information, you can be confident Sony is not the entity asking. When SOE’s services are fully restored, we strongly recommend that you log on and change your password. Additionally, if you use your Station or SOE game account name or password for other unrelated services or accounts, we strongly recommend that you change them, as well.

To protect against possible identity theft or other financial loss, we encourage you to remain vigilant, to review your account statements and to monitor your credit reports.
We are committed to helping our customers protect their personal data and we will provide a complimentary offering to assist users in enrolling in identity theft protection services and/or similar programs. The implementation will be at a local level and further details will be made available shortly in regions in which such programs are commonly utilized.

We thank you for your patience as we complete our investigation of this incident, and we regret any inconvenience. Our teams are working around the clock on this, and services will be restored as soon as possible. Sony takes information protection very seriously and will continue to work to ensure that additional measures are taken to protect personally identifiable information. Providing quality and secure entertainment services to our customers is our utmost priority. Please contact us at + 44 870-600-0267 (Monday to Friday 15:00 to 22:00 GMT excluding holidays) should you have any additional questions.

Sincerely,
Sony Online Entertainment LLC
Quote:
Originally Posted by www.soe.com/securityupdate
U.S. residents are entitled under U.S. law to one free credit report annually from each of the three major credit bureaus. To order your free credit report, visit www.annualcreditreport.com or call toll-free (877) 322-8228.

There's confidence for you.

As with PSN I'm unable to login to SOE to tentatively test emails/password combinations to uncover which ones I used to know whether to change them or not.
JA12 4th May 2011, 13:00 Quote
This ID theft makes people to jump to a conclusions.
Yes, GeoHot is a hacker, but so are many individuals in the bit-tech forums even if they don't call themselves that.

Sony announced that they're going to remove OtherOS feature from PS3 and GeoHot + other people decided that this is clearly wrong. You simply don't sell product and then take key features out. In my country, we have consumer laws and the court agrees: Sony has to pay 100 euros back to everyone who bought non-slim version of PS3 because of removed key feature.
GeoHot and others made sure there's OtherOS support in PS3. They don't support piracy and extra steps were taken to only bring back OtherOS feature.

As much Sony deserves to be slapped hard, this ID theft is also against paying users. No one says it's right. Not even GeoHot, who recently said in his blog post that he'd help Sony with this just to know how PSN was breached.

So place your blame where it belongs: thieves did the ID theft.
They find themselves in the prison if caught. Sony on the other hand, will too find itself in the court once again when the time comes. That's because there are such things as privacy laws.
impar 4th May 2011, 13:37 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by JA12
Sony announced that they're going to remove OtherOS feature from PS3 and GeoHot + other people decided that this is clearly wrong.
Geohot announced the crack first:
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
... Geohot released his first hack on January 2010, for it to work it needed OtherOS functionality, Sony then proceeded to remove Other OS functionality on April 2010.
Geohot actions were not provoked by the removal of OtherOS, Sonys choice to defend its system from Geohots attack was what removed OtherOS from the console.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JA12
Sony has to pay 100 euros back to everyone who bought non-slim version of PS3 because of removed key feature.
Fantastic. Finland, is it?
themax 4th May 2011, 19:39 Quote
http://www.engadget.com/2011/05/04/sony-responds-to-congress-all-77-million-psn-accounts-compromis/


Sony's response to Congress.

Sony does say, however, that it had 12.3 million credit card numbers on file, and 5.6 million of them from the US, and that investigators found a file on one of the servers named "Anonymous" with the words "We are Legion" inside it. Hard to draw many conclusions from that.
- Snippet from the Engadget Article.

It would be easy to blame them, but is most likely a ruse to cover up the tracks of the real culprit.
impar 4th May 2011, 19:45 Quote
Greetings!
Quote:
Originally Posted by themax
It would be easy to blame them, but is most likely a ruse to cover up the tracks of the real culprit.
Anonymous dont have exactly an hierarchy. Even if the majority decided not to mess with PS3 users online data, a small group might think differently.
Manu_Otaku 6th May 2011, 15:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveo_mcg
Quote:
Originally Posted by impar
Greetings!

Assuming you meant "OtherOS" when you wrote "other s", Geohot released his first hack on January 2010, for it to work it needed OtherOS functionality, Sony then proceeded to remove Other OS functionality on April 2010.
Geohot actions were not provoked by the removal of OtherOS, Sonys choice to defend its system from Geohots attack was what removed OtherOS from the console.

Another occasion where Sony is being solely blamed while the crackers\hackers are seen as heroes. :(

At the direct expense of its paying customers. Again blame is not a zero sum game Sony acted very poorly in this example.

You seem to want to exonerate Sony's actions by saying they were forced to withdraw this service, they weren't forced they chose to remove the OtherOs to protect a revenue stream at the expense of people who had already paid and had little recourse.

Look maybe it was not the reason for Geo in reality but it was the one given by him to support his actions, and sony also help in this becuase first they said it was for piracy purposes the removal of other S, and then they stated it was for money issues, therefore again sony lied to their users, stating firs at the launch of the device this application will last its entire lifecycle then for the reasons only known by sony , they took it without any compensation, becuase that feature in the end represent a value of money that was included in the total cost of the device, thats what i did tried to said, and for that sony is also responsible IMHO,
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