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Fable 3 has no experience, health bar

Fable 3 has no experience, health bar

Microsoft's Peter Molyneux has confirmed that Fable 3 has no XP or health bar, though he still thinks it is an RPG.

Presenting the upcoming Xbox 360 RPG Fable 3 at Microsoft's X10 event in San Francisco, Peter Molyneux has revealed that the game will not have any health bar or XP system.

Instead, player progression is reflected automatically by the changing appearance of weapons, while character damage merely darkens the screen - a technique already used by some shooters. The nearest thing Fable 3 has to experience points is the new followers system, which sees famous characters accruing a larger group of fans.

"It's an RPG without a health bar or experience," Molyneux said in a demonstration, via Eurogamer. "Because we put the levelling up into the world, with followers, you don't need experience."

The reason for the change is apparently that players didn't understand the old XP system and that Molyneux thought the idea of experience points was outdated.

"The absolute main reason is that most people didn't really understand it," Molyneux explained. "[i]When you asked people how to get red experience, they'd say, 'I don't know, sometimes it's green, sometimes it's red, sometimes it's blue'."

"Experience seemed 1990s, it seemed old school."

These are apparently the changes that Molyneux alluded to earlier this week, when he said that fans would be "pissed off"by some of the changes he was going to unveil at X10. To us, it certainly seems like the Fable series is getting progressively more casual - which is saying something considering that we had Joe's little sister review Fable 2 because of how strong the casual feel was.

Well, are you annoyed? Let us know in the forums.

44 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
msm722 12th February 2010, 13:05 Quote
XP is a very simple system. The only reason someone may not understand it is if it's not explained how you gain it and why.
Skiddywinks 12th February 2010, 13:12 Quote
Jesus Christ. Are you serious? That is the level of intelligence Fable 3 is being marketed to?

Before long, gameplay itself is going to be outdated and we are just going to be given a "CONGRATULATIONS! YOU FINISHED/STARTED THE GAME! YOU ARE AN AMAZING PERSON AND EVERYONE LOVES YOU!" screen.
Gareth Halfacree 12th February 2010, 13:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiddywinks
Before long, gameplay itself is going to be outdated and we are just going to be given a "CONGRATULATIONS! YOU FINISHED/STARTED THE GAME! YOU ARE AN AMAZING PERSON AND EVERYONE LOVES YOU!" screen.
You've played You Have to Burn the Rope, right?
jsheff 12th February 2010, 13:19 Quote
At first I was confused, but then I realised fairly quickly that to gain physical XP I used physical attacks, will XP using will attacks, and skill XP using ranged attacks. I quite liked the system in Fable 2. It made sense to me that I couldn't get better at using magic unless I actually used magic, or couldn't get better at melee unless I fought hand to hand.
CardJoe 12th February 2010, 13:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiddywinks
Before long, gameplay itself is going to be outdated and we are just going to be given a "CONGRATULATIONS! YOU FINISHED/STARTED THE GAME! YOU ARE AN AMAZING PERSON AND EVERYONE LOVES YOU!" screen.
You've played You Have to Burn the Rope, right?

Awesome little game, that.
barndoor101 12th February 2010, 13:23 Quote
but how will you know when you have levelled up? oh wait...
Unknownsock 12th February 2010, 13:26 Quote
I welcome any change to XP. Although this is just taking stats out which make RPG's decent/fun for alot of people.
Then again i try to welcome change i guess.

Although how did not all players understand XP?
I really seem to overestimate the average person.
I must be a god dam genius in todays standards...
Aterius Gmork 12th February 2010, 13:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by bit-tech
To us, it certainly seems like the Fable series is getting progressively more casual - which is saying something considering that we had Joe's little sister review Fable 2 because of how strong the casual feel was.

Maybe we should have him review the next game.
Skiddywinks 12th February 2010, 13:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
You've played You Have to Burn the Rope, right?

Haha, I have actually. But YHTBTR doesn't cost £40 a pop.
mjm25 12th February 2010, 13:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiddywinks
Jesus Christ. Are you serious? That is the level of intelligence Fable 3 is being marketed to?

Before long, gameplay itself is going to be outdated and we are just going to be given a "CONGRATULATIONS! YOU FINISHED/STARTED THE GAME! YOU ARE AN AMAZING PERSON AND EVERYONE LOVES YOU!" screen.

much like Portal! although that was ironic.
UrbanMarine 12th February 2010, 13:37 Quote
If it isn't broke, don't fix it. Taking away health and XP basically kills an important feature in RPGs. I still wonder why I even play video games anymore. It seems like game companies are taking a set back. Games are getting more simplistic, they're short in length & the story is meh. I wonder if the next XBOX will use cartridges?

Someone hit the RESET button so we can go back to the FF7 days............
ImInTheZoneBaby 12th February 2010, 13:49 Quote
"The absolute main reason is that most people didn't really understand it,"

Experience and health bars have been in games for years and years. It's pretty simple to understand, and even the different colour/type of experience that was in Fable 2 was even explained ingame; where it comes from and how to gain it.

But this new "followers" system.. I'm what I would like to think a "hardcore gamer", and I'm struggling to understand how people following you, or having fans in exchange for experience, makes you stronger?

Uhhh.
I'm confused with the new system, not the previous.
AngusW 12th February 2010, 13:54 Quote
Peter Molyneux, i've loved some of your game ideas in the past but taking out the experience and health bar is not being progessive. Its dumbing down the game even more than fable 2 which you could die as much as you wanted and just get back up again
Gunsmith 12th February 2010, 14:04 Quote
oh please, this is all to help you through the game quicker so you can buy the next POS released.
scarrmrcc 12th February 2010, 14:11 Quote
so every time you get hit... your cataracts get worse?
the "bad guys" only attack your face?
StoneyMahoney 12th February 2010, 14:13 Quote
Having been a long-time player of RPGs, both digital and the ol' paper/pencil/funny-shaped-dice kind, there have been a few conventions that have always been followed, and much ridiculed. Here goes...

1) I prepared to overcome 3-story tall Giant Bossman Charles Norris with his Armour of Carbotanium and his 12 foot Sword of Instant Decapitation by grinding Wimpy McRetard mobs armed with peashooters for an extra few levels.

2) The fight was quite fun, with Norris' fighting ability completely unaffected by the way we gouged massive lumps of flesh from his legs.

3) Our tank did a fantastic job, standing completely still and insulting Norris over and over again. Norris is just so sensitive under all the armour and blood-paint and necklaces made of the severed heads of his foes, he also stood still and tried to kill this meany in the tin hat while 95% of the pain was inflicted by other people standing behind him.

4) Norris died when our rogue got a glancing blow on him with his dual-wielded feather dusters. Admitted most of the work was done by my continual attempts at evisceration and our mage throwing bolts of raw electricity directly into his brain stem.

5) Norris' death caused the mage to level up, increasing her ability to cast fireballs, conjure food, turn humanoids into sheep, read magic scrolls, pick locks, play the mandolin and do crossword puzzles.

6) We then rifled through Norris' corpse. It contained some armour (all one-size-fits-all-and-both-sexes), some health potions (which he never used), some weapons (which he was too big to pick up with snapping), Norris' severed head (we took one each) and some money (which he never spent having wiled away 100,000 years guarding the highest peak of this castle around the clock without a break in case someone tried to... er... I'm not sure, I didn't read the quest text)

7) Our healer was tired from constantly reattaching the limbs and restoring the blood volume of our tourettes-inflicted meat shield, so he sat down to heal himself by eating some bread. All bread is, of course, made with water from the Fountain of Youth and grain from the Fields of Elysium, so 30 seconds later he was fine.

8) I was also badly hurt, with one eyeball jolted out of it's socket and a deadly poison seeping through my veins for the last twenty minutes. I didn't have any food and our tank wasn't sharing, so I visited the local inn's surgical trauma unit for some while-u-sleep treatment.

9) When I woke up I went to visit the bank to deposit the money that had built up in my purse. There was so much of it they had to open a new vault just to accommodate it all. It could have been a lot worse if my purse didn't automatically change money up into higher denominations.

10) After that I went to unload all the extra equipment I had collected in my backpack from the slain corpses of my foes. The blacksmith gave me a good price for the sword, shield, dagger, 4 quarterstaves, 7 hatchets, 8 ears of wheat, 24 troll loincloths, 63 in-grown toenails, 99 corrupted worm wangs, and 230 broken chair legs. God only knows what he does with that stuff, or how he can afford to buy it all considering that the only weapons he sells are rusted pieces of crap that no-one in their right mind would ever actually use.
CardJoe 12th February 2010, 14:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by StoneyMahoney
Having been a long-time player of RPGs, both digital and the ol' paper/pencil/funny-shaped-dice kind, there have been a few conventions that have always been followed, and much ridiculed. Here goes...

1) I prepared to overcome 3-story tall Giant Bossman Charles Norris with his Armour of Carbotanium and his 12 foot Sword of Instant Decapitation by grinding Wimpy McRetard mobs armed with peashooters for an extra few levels.

2) The fight was quite fun, with Norris' fighting ability completely unaffected by the way we gouged massive lumps of flesh from his legs.

3) Our tank did a fantastic job, standing completely still and insulting Norris over and over again. Norris is just so sensitive under all the armour and blood-paint and necklaces made of the severed heads of his foes, he also stood still and tried to kill this meany in the tin hat while 95% of the pain was inflicted by other people standing behind him.

4) Norris died when our rogue got a glancing blow on him with his dual-wielded feather dusters. Admitted most of the work was done by my continual attempts at evisceration and our mage throwing bolts of raw electricity directly into his brain stem.

5) Norris' death caused the mage to level up, increasing her ability to cast fireballs, conjure food, turn humanoids into sheep, read magic scrolls, pick locks, play the mandolin and do crossword puzzles.

6) We then rifled through Norris' corpse. It contained some armour (all one-size-fits-all-and-both-sexes), some health potions (which he never used), some weapons (which he was too big to pick up with snapping), Norris' severed head (we took one each) and some money (which he never spent having wiled away 100,000 years guarding the highest peak of this castle around the clock without a break in case someone tried to... er... I'm not sure, I didn't read the quest text)

7) Our healer was tired from constantly reattaching the limbs and restoring the blood volume of our tourettes-inflicted meat shield, so he sat down to heal himself by eating some bread. All bread is, of course, made with water from the Fountain of Youth and grain from the Fields of Elysium, so 30 seconds later he was fine.

8) I was also badly hurt, with one eyeball jolted out of it's socket and a deadly poison seeping through my veins for the last twenty minutes. I didn't have any food and our tank wasn't sharing, so I visited the local inn's surgical trauma unit for some while-u-sleep treatment.

9) When I woke up I went to visit the bank to deposit the money that had built up in my purse. There was so much of it they had to open a new vault just to accommodate it all. It could have been a lot worse if my purse didn't automatically change money up into higher denominations.

10) After that I went to unload all the extra equipment I had collected in my backpack from the slain corpses of my foes. The blacksmith gave me a good price for the sword, shield, dagger, 4 quarterstaves, 7 hatchets, 8 ears of wheat, 24 troll loincloths, 63 in-grown toenails, 99 corrupted worm wangs, and 230 broken chair legs. God only knows what he does with that stuff, or how he can afford to buy it all considering that the only weapons he sells are rusted pieces of crap that no-one in their right mind would ever actually use.

wat
Gunsmith 12th February 2010, 14:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by StoneyMahoney
brilliance

im sorry but you are getting rep for that, I lol'd :D
ApostleUk 12th February 2010, 14:29 Quote
[QUOTE=CardJoe]
Quote:
Originally Posted by StoneyMahoney
.7) Our healer was tired from constantly reattaching the limbs and restoring the blood volume of our tourettes-inflicted meat shield, so he sat down to heal himself by eating some bread. All bread is, of course, made with water from the Fountain of Youth and grain from the Fields of Elysium, so 30 seconds later he was fine.

Lol
eddtox 12th February 2010, 14:46 Quote
AAAND StoneyMahoney gets +1 rep for his witty, satirical and ultimately very accurate description of my favourite genre.
rickysio 12th February 2010, 14:49 Quote
I think you broke Joe.
Tokukachi 12th February 2010, 15:06 Quote
I thought Fable II was utter ****, it showed glimpses of brilliance, like Archon's Knot, but the main game was so poor it never really captured me. Thus I have Zero interest in Fable III or any other shite Peter Molyneux is peddling these days, yes he made some great games in the 90's and now it's all gone to his head...
liratheal 12th February 2010, 15:19 Quote
Since when did Fisher Price buy Lionhead?
StoneyMahoney 12th February 2010, 15:34 Quote
Thanks y'all, I write real good. But seriously...

HP, XP and leveling were a solution to an ancient problem in tabletop RPGs. Actions had to be simple enough to be resolved mentally in a few seconds, so the statistics and rules of RPGs had to be streamlined:

"Alan, you are attacked from behind. Reflex save = 20, your Reflex bonus = +2, roll 18 to pass [rolls 6] you don't notice the attack. Your flat-footed AC = 12, +1 weapon so roll 11 to hit [rolls 15] you're hit, damage is 1d6+1 [rolls 5] 6 damage, you're on -1HP so you are now unconscious and bleeding. Right, next player..."

A combination of precalculated situational stats and simple status indicators like HP made table-top RPGs fast to play. Gaining XP until you level up before adjusting and recalculating those stats stops character advancement from getting in the way of the action by getting it over and done with periodically in a single session of number-crunching to be completed at the GM's discretion.

These stats first popped up in computer RPGs because they mimicked the rules of their table-top brethren and ran on very slow computers. Action complexity has obviously increased over time, just look at the mental-arithmetic unfriendly 5-figure HP maximums many RPGs have, but the basic building blocks of HP/XP/Levels have been left in place so long that now everyone has an entrenched expectation for them to be there. Any game in which they are absent 'obviously' isn't an RPG, by popular misguided definition.

With this reliance on these over-simplified stats, RPGs have crippled themselves and, despite decades of development, haven't come anywhere near fulfilling their full potential. With the calculating and graphical power of computers today, RPGs could have on-the-fly recalculation of stats every time you are hit to reflect the actual wound location and severity, complete with accurate graphical depiction, plus damage to armour affecting it's ability to protect you from repeated attacks as it weakens in specific areas. How about abilities and skills that change realistically when you use/forget them, tactics learned the hard way equating to actual changes in behaviour in later similar fights, physical statistics and appearance that change reflecting your character's past, both played and back story... the possibilities are limitless.

+1 to Molyneux for trying to push us past our own imposed limits.

(And yes, Bit Tech, I am available if you want to hire me. Seriously)
SazBard 12th February 2010, 15:34 Quote
I've long been thinking that XP is an outdated concept and agree with Peters decision to scrap it. I wish game developers would try to think outside the box instead of beating the same ole' deadhorse, especially in MMO's, XP is the cancer thats eating away at the potential fun to be had in these games.

my 2pence worth of course.
nukeman8 12th February 2010, 16:44 Quote
experience system needs to go, it encourages repeating grinding with no thought to your actions.
But just dumbing the game down some more isnt the way forward.

@StoneyMahoney, some games have tried some of what you have said and in reality it doesnt work well.
skills that decrease because you havent used them in a while? Would just force people to keep track on what skill they had use and when to make sure it wouldnt decrease, again yet another grind like experience.
Games have been during armour degradation for ages just not the graphical side of it.

I think learning real tactics and skills in a game is better then some made up ones in a game, you mentioned it in your last sentence. You would have to notice how different enemies fought in different ways and the best way with dealing with them.
And no not just Enemy A has high physical resistance use a magic based weapon, thats a poor excuse of a way making a enemy and the fight interesting.
Instead have some act more like stalkers, biding their time, tracking you for ages if necessary until its the best time to strike, ie when your low in health or already fighting something else. Im fed up of seeing all the monsters in games come blindly running at you or queuing up to get slaughtered.
CardJoe 12th February 2010, 16:51 Quote
It doesn't make a difference. From what Molyneux says Followers is just a new term for XP. You'll just grind that system because there's no real difference between:

Kill 3 monsters, get 5 XP
and
Kill 3 monsters, get 2 followers.

It's all just economies - and there's nothing wrong with that. XP, followers, levels, humanity gauges, etc, these are all valid ways of charting player progression. The problem with grinds and XP is how the system is used and allowing players to repeat little events to grind it and so on.
Tyrrax 12th February 2010, 18:00 Quote
Consider that Peter Molyneux was the guy with the idea to give us a 360 degree rotating view of falling piece of bird **** in Fable 2. There is no such thing as too stupid with him.
SMIFFYDUDE 12th February 2010, 18:06 Quote
Its funny people are mentioning pen and paper RPGs because I was playing Fabled Lands, a game book series form the '90s, just before reading this article. If it was to be made into a video game and it would pound all other RPGs into the dirt.

http://flapp.sourceforge.net
LucusLoC 12th February 2010, 18:09 Quote
@StoneyMahoney

check out the systems being developed for Dwarf fortress. they are getting pretty detailed, especial the damage model, which is actually pretty damn realistic. the leveling system also tries to stay sane, with no over all xp, but every skill having its own xp. there is still a lot wrong with it, but since it is still under development there is plenty of room to grow. i am actually going to copy your little rant over to the forums there to get some discussion going. hop on over if you would like.


link here: http://www.bay12games.com/forum/index.php?topic=49472.0
chrisb2e9 12th February 2010, 19:06 Quote
Quote:
'I don't know, sometimes it's green, sometimes it's red, sometimes it's blue'

Shouldn't these people start school before they are allowed to be interviewed?
eternum 12th February 2010, 19:56 Quote
Ugh. More from this useless man. He creates games with over-hyped features that only thinly mask the cookie-cutter boring crap beneath - and then claims that they're 'revolutionary". Fable1 didn't revolutionize jack and was about as inspired as the load I just flushed (and only mildly more entertaining). I never played Fable 2 (I know I know - don't knock it til you try it) but a quick perusal of Lionhead's site lists a dog companion as a "groundbreaking addition," and the ability to use multiple hand weapons, bows, and magic as a new combat system that the game "pioneers." Seriously?

Taking out the xp and health bars isn't going to make this game a unique and beautiful flower. It's going to be the same old crap with a big sticker that says "NEW AND INNOVATIVE" without actually being any such thing.

Fable 1 didn't revolutionize jack, Fable 2 didn't revolutionize jack, and Fable 3 won't revolutionize jack. And boy is Jack pissed about it - he wants some revolutionizing already!

And yes, this is a stupid rant, no I don't have to play it if I don't like it, blah blah blah. I get it. I just get incredibly annoyed when someone markets themselves as being innovative when they do something that has been done before or is so pointless or minor as to not be worth hyping. It's like a toddler who finally discovers how to flush the toilet and thinks he's just the cleverest boy in the whole world...
D-Cyph3r 12th February 2010, 20:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by eternum
Ugh. More from this useless man. He creates games with over-hyped features that only thinly mask the cookie-cutter boring crap beneath - and then claims that they're 'revolutionary". Fable1 didn't revolutionize jack and was about as inspired as the load I just flushed (and only mildly more entertaining). I never played Fable 2 (I know I know - don't knock it til you try it) but a quick perusal of Lionhead's site lists a dog companion as a "groundbreaking addition," and the ability to use multiple hand weapons, bows, and magic as a new combat system that the game "pioneers." Seriously?

Taking out the xp and health bars isn't going to make this game a unique and beautiful flower. It's going to be the same old crap with a big sticker that says "NEW AND INNOVATIVE" without actually being any such thing.

Fable 1 didn't revolutionize jack, Fable 2 didn't revolutionize jack, and Fable 3 won't revolutionize jack. And boy is Jack pissed about it - he wants some revolutionizing already!

And yes, this is a stupid rant, no I don't have to play it if I don't like it, blah blah blah. I get it. I just get incredibly annoyed when someone markets themselves as being innovative when they do something that has been done before or is so pointless or minor as to not be worth hyping. It's like a toddler who finally discovers how to flush the toilet and thinks he's just the cleverest boy in the whole world...


I was gonna post pretty much the exact same thing earlier, +rep for saving me the hassle. ;)
thehippoz 12th February 2010, 20:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
You've played You Have to Burn the Rope, right?

hahah the song is priceless, I can see some fat guy pressing refresh and watching videos, then back to solitaire =] you know that's what they are going to be selling in about 2 years they will make sure your character is bi-sexual too
StoneyMahoney 12th February 2010, 20:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by nukeman8
skills that decrease because you havent used them in a while?

Games have been during armour degradation for ages just not the graphical side of it.

I think learning real tactics and skills in a game is better then some made up ones in a game, you mentioned it in your last sentence.

Im fed up of seeing all the monsters in games come blindly running at you or queuing up to get slaughtered.

@nukeman8: I suppose the rate at which skills rise/fall is quite a difficult balance to strike, especially if tactical needs change substantially later in the game. Maybe needs some kind of periodic "refresher" you can use like a respec to boost a neglected skill up a bit.

My suggestion is that moves hit the same area (if not exactly the same spot) and when armour in specific areas is badly damaged then attacks to those areas have less damage reduction, with visual damage cues for the player to keep track of. I don't know if that's been done, I've been a little lax in playing new games recently. Damn this recession...

I just finished playing through Zelda Wind Waker, and it's a great example of progress by actual experience. New bits of gear means more avenues of attack, but it's up to you to explore them and figure out what's most effective.

Yeah, the Kung-Fu film stylee take-a-number-and-queue tactic or blindly charging mobs are lowest common denominator when it comes to bad guy behavior and I'm not a fan either. However, the idea of opportunists stealthily following you could be difficult to get right, smells to much of insta-death to me and that's really irritating.
javaman 12th February 2010, 23:44 Quote
good grief, next games will start mimicking real life!! >.>

Its the health bar and little numbers that helps me differentiate between the two
Sloth 13th February 2010, 00:03 Quote
Not sure if anyone here as heard of or played Mortal Online, but it has a nifty little system that steps forward a bit.

No character levels or character XP, instead you level up individual attributes. And they are specific. You can level up how fast you walk, how long you can hold your breath, how good you are with swords on horses, etc. It maintains the tried and true system of gaining experience, but mitigates it into a much more intimate system.

Also, health bars do not display numbers (at the present UI, though I believe this is intended to stay). You also don't see how much you hit for (unless you level the skill!) so attacks are either a lot less red bar on the screen, or a little less red bar. It makes difficulties of enemies impossible to judge and combat far more intuitive rather than number based, yet still provides enough information to make intelligent and informed decisions.
LordPyrinc 13th February 2010, 00:21 Quote
I prefer an XP system that is based on the skills you use. Dungeon Siege did that it a very simple way and that was kinda cool.

What I would like to see... the longer my character uses an axe for example, I should become more proficient in weilding axes and be able to user higher level axes. Substitute axe for any number of things including certain spell classes and you get my drift.
SilentDescent 13th February 2010, 19:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordPyrinc
I prefer an XP system that is based on the skills you use. Dungeon Siege did that it a very simple way and that was kinda cool.

What I would like to see... the longer my character uses an axe for example, I should become more proficient in weilding axes and be able to user higher level axes. Substitute axe for any number of things including certain spell classes and you get my drift.

Ah, but then you most likely have to deal with another stunningly illogical gaming device. The Levelled List.
Veles 13th February 2010, 20:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanMarine
If it isn't broke, don't fix it. Taking away health and XP basically kills an important feature in RPGs.

XP isn't a feature, it's a means to an end. Many people forget that all an RPG is at it's roots is an interactive story. XP and leveling up was just a way of showing progression of your character's strength. As much as I think Peter talks mainly with his behind in charge, I do think he is right, XP isn't necessary, and even more so with today's games.

Most games now have levelled enemies, when a character goes up in levels, the enemies become more powerful or are replaced with more powerful enemies to match the character's level so the player doesn't ever feel like he isn't challenged (in theory).

I'll give you three examples of recent games that do this.

Dragon Age and Mass Effect (1 & 2) use levelled enemies, the enemies stay the same but they have more health and do more damage.

Then there's Oblivion, in this, the enemies level with you to a certain point, then are replaced with a more powerful enemy. For example, a wolf would level up with you, but when you reach a certain point, the wolves are replaced with mountain lions.

The thing with these games is they're non linear RPGs, in Dragon Age they couldn't make the Magi Tower have high level enemies while Orzimmar has low level ones because that would completely defy the point of the non-linearity. Yeah, you could go to the Magi Tower, but you'd die, that's no different than having those Anima walls in Assassins Creed.

So what really is the point in the levelling up system in these games? It doesn't really do anything, whoopty do, I levelled up....and very little has changed, you might have a new ability or two but you don't need a XP system to do that. The fights are still roughly the same difficulty, so really the levelling system no longer achieves it's original purpose and it's just something that people put in RPGs because that's what you have in RPGs.

Take away XP and you also take away things like unnecessary grinding which is just really something put in there to pad out a game.
Techno-Dann 13th February 2010, 20:50 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by StoneyMahoney
With this reliance on these over-simplified stats, RPGs have crippled themselves and, despite decades of development, haven't come anywhere near fulfilling their full potential.

Therein lies the problem with Fable 3 - the cure to oversimplification isn't further simplification! Face it - a lot of RPG players are nerds. The hardcore RPG crowd likes doing complicated mental arithmetic, likes planning three dungeons and a boss fight ahead, and definitely does not like a game that says "It's OK, I'll do all the hard stuff for you. All you need to do is follow the glowy trail and push buttons when I tell you to."
Quote:
Molyneux thought the idea of experience points hardcore gamers was outdated.
Fix'd
GiantStickMan 14th February 2010, 10:16 Quote
I guess you can draw two conclusions here, either the average gamer is an idiot, or the system was not properly explained leaving people struggling to understand it. By the sounds of it, it's the former, but I haven't played Fable 2 yet so I can't really comment.
buggerlugz 14th February 2010, 10:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by CardJoe
Awesome little game, that.

I was a bit disapointed I didn't get awarded any XP for killing him though........ ;)
Star*Dagger 16th February 2010, 06:10 Quote
I'm hardcore and will only play games that will allow me to kill other hardcore people, right now that is Star Trek Online, which B-T needs to review in the next week to retain any semblance of being a gaming review publication.
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