bit-tech.net

NZXT launches CAM monitoring software

NZXT launches CAM monitoring software

NZXT's CAM software, a free download for Windows, offers cloud-based storage of system monitoring metrics - and will include iOS and Android support in the near future.

NZXT, best known for its cases and cooling products, is branching out into the software realm with the launch of CAM, a PC health monitoring package.

Released as a free download for all, even those without NZXT parts in their rigs, CAM is a Windows-only package which the company promises offers useful real-time monitoring of everything from system temperatures to disk space and system load. Each statistic is mirrored on NZXT's remote servers, and the company promises to extend the CAM package in the future with iOS and Android app extensions for remote monitoring via smartphone - including per-process statistics. Another added feature of the cloud-based system is historical data, which allows tracked metrics to be viewed over anything up to a year after monitoring.

As well as monitoring, the software promises real-time alerts for everything from dangerous temperature spikes in the CPU or GPU to a fan failure, sudden drop in hard drive space or even a faulty CMOS battery. These will, when the companion apps are released, include push notifications to mobile devices - although it's not yet clear whether you'll be able to do something about the problem, such as shutting the computer down safely, from the smartphone apps.

While the real-time monitoring capabilities are little more than is already available built-in to Windows, the cloud-based storage for historical analysis could prove a real winner - providing nobody raises any privacy concerns about the software sharing system specifications and details of running applications with NZXT. The software is available for free download at the official website, or if you still need some convincing you can watch the company's launch video below.

4 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Farsan 21st May 2014, 23:44 Quote
I will download and use it as soon as they launche the android app...
I like the concept... let see
Umbra 22nd May 2014, 01:17 Quote
It's free so you can't really complain but, "cloud-based storage for historical analysis could prove a real winner" really, I must have missed why that option would be so popular for the home user, just seems like another solution for a problem most people don't have?

I gave CAM a try and it's OK but relatively basic compared to HWiNFO which is also free and there is also a good desktop gadget for HWiNFO.
Gareth Halfacree 22nd May 2014, 10:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Umbra
It's free so you can't really complain but, "cloud-based storage for historical analysis could prove a real winner" really, I must have missed why that option would be so popular for the home user, just seems like another solution for a problem most people don't have?
I can think of plenty of reasons why that'd be handy. Let's start with trend analysis: if I was having trouble with my rig last summer, I can have a look at how hot it got - and what programs I was running at the time - to see if I need to upgrade the cooling for this summer. Troubleshooting: if my system crashes and restarts, there's no guarantee I'll have access to historical data stored locally; if it's on remote servers, I can be looking at it on a different system while I'm waiting for my PC to reboot, see what was running and why it might have fallen over. Then there's load analysis: when it comes time to upgrade, I can use the historical data to see if I really need to splash out on a Core i7 and 1KW PSU, or if my usage indicates I'd be better off saving my cash and buying something lower-end - or vice-versa.

Remote monitoring: it's not just for enterprise users.
Umbra 22nd May 2014, 12:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
I can think of plenty of reasons why that'd be handy. Let's start with trend analysis: if I was having trouble with my rig last summer, I can have a look at how hot it got - and what programs I was running at the time - to see if I need to upgrade the cooling for this summer. Troubleshooting: if my system crashes and restarts, there's no guarantee I'll have access to historical data stored locally; if it's on remote servers, I can be looking at it on a different system while I'm waiting for my PC to reboot, see what was running and why it might have fallen over. Then there's load analysis: when it comes time to upgrade, I can use the historical data to see if I really need to splash out on a Core i7 and 1KW PSU, or if my usage indicates I'd be better off saving my cash and buying something lower-end - or vice-versa.

Remote monitoring: it's not just for enterprise users.

Thanks Gareth, I hoped my "I must have missed why that option would be so popular" would get a response and your reasoning makes sense but I'm not sure that many people will actually use it to the extent you describe.

Most of us that build our own PC's know our gear inside out so when we get a problem we probably have an idea what's at fault, but if a user doesn't know where to start then I'm not sure attempting to analyze a load of historical data would help them sort out the problem and when it comes to upgrading, some sensible, restrained people might base their reasons on load analysis but for most of us it's more a case of "I must have it!"
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums