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Microsoft reissues Windows 8.1 Update 1 via WSUS

Microsoft reissues Windows 8.1 Update 1 via WSUS

Microsoft has resolved the issue with rolling Windows 8.1 Update 1 out via WSUS and appeased customers with a new 120-day grace period, but home users are still facing the 13th of May deadline.

Microsoft has reissued its Windows 8.1 Update 1 patch for Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) users, having resolved a flaw that would prevent client systems from installing future updates.

A mandatory install for all Windows 8.1 users - those without Update 1 will be blocked from downloading security and bug-fix updates starting with next month's Patch Tuesday on the 13th of May - the update has been the source of more than a little heartache for Microsoft's customers. As well as the flaw that saw it pulled from WSUS shortly after release, users have reported numerous issues installing the patch and further flaws once the software is installed.

The cause of the WSUS flaw has been isolated, at least, and Microsoft has officially rereleased the update for corporate customers. 'This means that you can now easily deploy these updates to the computers or servers you manage,' explained Microsoft's Brendan LeBlanc in the company's announcement. 'For computers and servers that have already installed these updates, note that Windows Update will re-offer them but it will only install the portion of the update that addresses the fix. Other portions of the update which users have already downloaded and installed will not be downloaded or installed a second time.'

Having perhaps recognised that the rollout of the first major update to Windows 8.1, and a mandatory one at that, hasn't gone smoothly, LeBlanc also announced a new grace period to win over corporate customers. 'We’ve decided to extend the timeframe for enterprise customers to deploy these new product updates from 30 to 120 days,' LeBlanc explained. 'In order to receive future updates, all customers managing updates using WSUS, Windows Intune, or System Center Configuration Manager have until August 12th to apply the new updates. For those that decide to defer installation, separate security updates will be published during the 120-day window.'

For home users, however, the extended deadline does not apply: anyone outside a WSUS-controlled corporate network who has not installed Windows 8.1 Update 1 by the 13th of May will not be able to download updates until Update 1 is installed.

43 Comments

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SchizoFrog 17th April 2014, 13:54 Quote
They can keep it. I just bought a new laptop for my parents that had Windows 8, so I went through the process of installing all the updates (as you can't install 8.1 until 8 is updated) and then installed 8.1. All seemed to be well and not a single problem... UNTIL... I tried to install Office at which point I was told that I had to be an administrator. The account was an admin as it was the only account, not only that but the UAC settings had been turned off (something I always do while setting up a computer). I tried every suggested answer I could find via Google and nothing seemed to make a difference. 4 hours later enough was enough and now Windows 7 Ultimate is happily running.
Buzzons 17th April 2014, 14:50 Quote
You turned off UAC? Did you right click the office installer -> run as admin?
GoodBytes 17th April 2014, 15:40 Quote
It's because you disabled UAC. No is admin in Windows 8.
Disabling UAC won't make you true admin, it will drop you down to a lower account.
UAC is part of Windows security system, and can't be disabled.

To me it seams that you did not give Windows 8 a chance, and you already wanted to put Windows 7 in the first place, and you were just trying to find an excuse. So, now your parents are stuck with WIn7 due to your close mind set. This is exactly the same behavior with people going "XP for life", because of UAC system. It is a system to provide a serious level of protection which so far has not been by-passed since it's introduction in Vista (good work Microsoft), and you decide that your parent should have none of that, and should run as true admin all the time.

Switch to Linux based OS, and tell how everyone you like running as root.
Alecto 17th April 2014, 16:23 Quote
Ah, choices, choices:

Install the Update and risk your system becoming completely useless (as many users have reported)

or

forgo the update until M$ gets of their dumb lazy a$$ and fixes it and also waive any security updates

And all this on the very day the new *ubuntu LTS is coming out? Should be interesting :-)
Corky42 17th April 2014, 16:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
It's because you disabled UAC. No is admin in Windows 8.
Disabling UAC won't make you true admin, it will drop you down to a lower account.
UAC is part of Windows security system, and can't be disabled.

To me it seams that you did not give Windows 8 a chance, and you already wanted to put Windows 7 in the first place, and you were just trying to find an excuse. So, now your parents are stuck with WIn7 due to your close mind set. This is exactly the same behavior with people going "XP for life", because of UAC system. It is a system to provide a serious level of protection which so far has not been by-passed since it's introduction in Vista (good work Microsoft), and you decide that your parent should have none of that, and should run as true admin all the time.

That's odd because i thought UAC had been hacked way back in 2007.
http://news.techworld.com/security/8873/two-step-uac-hack-published/
Quote:
Robert Paveza, a web application developer with marketing firm Terralever, has published a paper (PDF) demonstrating a two-stage attack which he says allows malicious code to infect Vista systems even from accounts running under the limited privileges afforded by UAC.
In fact Microsoft have said, Microsoft: UAC not a security feature.
http://news.techworld.com/security/8031/microsoft-uac-not-a-security-feature/
Quote:
For those who thought the User Account Control (UAC) feature introduced in Windows Vista was intended to set security boundaries, Microsoft has made a clarification: it isn't.
Cthippo 17th April 2014, 16:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
To me it seams that you did not give Windows 8 a chance

If you can't get something minimally working in 4 hours, then there is a problem.
GoodBytes 17th April 2014, 17:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alecto

Install the Update and risk your system becoming completely useless (as many users have reported)

or

forgo the update until M$ gets of their dumb lazy a$$ and fixes it and also waive any security updates

And all this on the very day the new *ubuntu LTS is coming out? Should be interesting :-)
If you use a registry cleaner at some point in time, you will probably have a problem.
If not, it will most likely work just fine, especially if Windows is fully updated, and drivers are the latest.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
That's odd because i thought UAC had been hacked way back in 2007.
http://news.techworld.com/security/8873/two-step-uac-hack-published/
B.S. You need to grant it admin in the first place.
Me too, I can run "hackLinux" executable, under root, and go "Oh! Look! Linux is not secure at all!"
Quote:

In fact Microsoft have said, Microsoft: UAC not a security feature.
http://news.techworld.com/security/8031/microsoft-uac-not-a-security-feature/
Of course it isn't. It won't start detecting malware. UAC is not an anti-malware or anti-virus solution, much like Linux account model is not a security feature either.
wolfticket 17th April 2014, 17:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cthippo
If you can't get something minimally working in 4 hours, then there is a problem.
To be fair, it sounds like it was the initial unnecessary (and arguably misguided) step of of turning off UAC control in Windows 8 that was the caused 4 hours worth of the problems and ultimately giving up.
It is not something that is recommended or necessary to do.

Anyway,

I'm not surprised Microsoft are giving corporate users more breathing room. 30 days always seemed somewhat ambitious to me, with or without hitches.
It wouldn't shock me if they extended the period to other users once they see adoption rates. It is a fairly big and potentially off putting download, depending on your connection speed.
Corky42 17th April 2014, 18:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
B.S. You need to grant it admin in the first place.
Me too, I can run "hackLinux" executable, under root, and go "Oh! Look! Linux is not secure at all!"
No you don't. http://news.techworld.com/security/8873/two-step-uac-hack-published/
Quote:
"For instance, if users believe they are downloading a 'Pac-Man' clone, such a game could be run while the malicious software did its work in the background," Paveza wrote. "It is important to note that, realistically, once the proxy infection tool has been run on the target machine, the target is effectively infected."

Meanwhile, the program could create an "executable stub" pointing to a target program that runs at a higher level. The stub would be stored in a place such as the Start menu where the user would click on it thinking to run the original, legitimate higher-level program
So unless you are classing piggy backing on a higher level process to gain elevated privileges, a means of attack used by the majority of naughty programs. If you class that as the user granting a program admin rights then your definition of granting admin rights is very different than mine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Of course it isn't. It won't start detecting malware. UAC is not an anti-malware or anti-virus solution, much like Linux account model is not a security feature either.
Sorry but didnt you not say "UAC is part of Windows security system, and can't be disabled." Ohh wait yea, you did right here.
Nexxo 17th April 2014, 18:30 Quote
The moral of the story is: if you are going to be all l33t h4xx0rz ninja and disable standard OS features, know what you are actually doing.
GoodBytes 17th April 2014, 18:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
No you don't. http://news.techworld.com/security/8873/two-step-uac-hack-published/

So unless you are classing piggy backing on a higher level process to gain elevated privileges, a means of attack used by the majority of naughty programs. If you class that as the user granting a program admin rights then your definition of granting admin rights is very different than mine.

Ok Corky you are being an idiot.
If you are going to download a PacMan clone which requires Admin to run, for some reason, and ALLOW it, and it decides to execute another program PART OF IT, which infects your computer. The ENTIRE package: PacMan clone, is a malware.

You know this perfectly, but you decide to ignore it, just to bash on something to be "hip" and "cool".
Quote:

Sorry but didnt you not say "UAC is part of Windows security system, and can't be disabled." Ohh wait yea, you did right here.
Yea. Its not a security feature, but it is a security system.
Your point being?
Corky42 17th April 2014, 19:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Ok Corky you are being an idiot.
If you are going to download a PacMan clone which requires Admin to run, for some reason, and ALLOW it, and it decides to execute another program PART OF IT, which infects your computer. The ENTIRE package: PacMan clone, is a malware.

You know this perfectly, but you decide to ignore it, just to bash on something to be "hip" and "cool".

Seriously is there a need to insult people
At no point has the user granted admin rights to run the program, all they have done is click yes to the normal UAC prompt that pops up when ever you run almost any program. The program then could create an "executable stub" pointing to a target program that runs at a higher level.

And if you want further proof that your original statement of "UAC is part of Windows security system, and can't be disabled." is incorrect allow me to enlighten you. http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9218916/Malware_turns_off_Windows_UAC_warns_Microsoft

Malware turns off Windows' UAC, warns Microsoft.
Quote:
UAC has not been problem-free on the technical side, either. Months before Windows 7's debut, a pair of researchers revealed a bug in the feature that hackers could use to piggyback on preapproved Microsoft code to trick Windows 7 into granting malware full access rights.
Or how about tricking the user into running a program they believe they can trust, like the command prompt.
http://codeempire.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/hacking-social-engineering-using-uac.html
Quote:
However Microsoft while developing UAC, and perform bug checks they forgot to notice Windows Command Preprocessor, functionality which defeats the purpose of Command Prompt.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Yea. Its not a security feature, but it is a security system.
Your point being?
So not only do you have to result to insults, you also want to quibble about semantics.
Pathetic.
GoodBytes 17th April 2014, 19:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42

At no point has the user granted admin rights to run the program, all they have done is click yes to the normal UAC prompt that pops up when ever you run almost any program. The program then could create an "executable stub" pointing to a target program that runs at a higher level.
Application don't show UAC prompt. I don't know where you get that most application do. Do you have any proof of this? I'll take a recording on your computer as good enough, because I know this is 100% false.

Granting the application elevation right, by allowing the application at the UAC prompt, means that you give is Admin rights.

Quote:
And if you want further proof that your original statement of "UAC is part of Windows security system, and can't be disabled." is incorrect allow me to enlighten you. http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9218916/Malware_turns_off_Windows_UAC_warns_Microsoft
Already compromised system. NEXT!
Quote:

Or how about tricking the user into running a program they believe they can trust, like the command prompt.
http://codeempire.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/hacking-social-engineering-using-uac.html
Not my problem. Use common sense. Download and run thing from trusted site.
If you want to run image.jpg.exe, that is not my problem, nor Windows.
The same way, as if a person does not know how to use Linux, and follow false post or article on the internet that says to format the computer or install a malware software, for something else. Windows and Linux and any OS, can just do so much against protecting the user unintended action. Windows RT is an example of how to fix that. But you see, it doesn't do to well with people. calling it enclosed environment. Well... what do you want.

If you don't know what you are doing, seek advice, else learn from your mistakes.
Quote:

So not only do you have to result to insults, you also want to quibble about semantics.
Pathetic.
Where did I insult you?
Nexxo 17th April 2014, 20:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
At no point has the user granted admin rights to run the program, all they have done is click yes to the normal UAC prompt that pops up when ever you run almost any program.

Wait, what?!? :)

UAC pops up only when a program wants to make changes to your computer. It says so in the little window. That is not a normal scenario; that is a please-sit-up-and-take-notice scenario. Do you wish to let it, user? You clicked yes? Ow, big mistake!

There is no known failsafe against PEBCAK.
SchizoFrog 17th April 2014, 21:26 Quote
OK, let me clarify...

In Windows 7 when I go to install programs I get the UAC pop up asking if I am sure. I turn it down to the bottom setting to stop those pop ups while installing the very same programs I always install from my own saved installations when I do a clean install.
With Office in 7, I mount my disc image, run and install no problems. However, when I came to Windows 8 and installed the same software I got the window pop up so I once again turned it down to the bottom setting and carried on as normal, only this time when I mounted the disc image and ran it I was told I had to be an Admin, and so the 4 hour session began during which I also tried resetting UAC back to it's default setting and still to no avail. I could not, no matter what I did get Office to install.
So back to 7 I went, turned UAC down once again, installed all my software no problems and then turn UAC back up to default. So in spite of all the comments above hinting that I did something in error, I do not believe so.
Corky42 18th April 2014, 07:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Application don't show UAC prompt. I don't know where you get that most application do. Do you have any proof of this? I'll take a recording on your computer as good enough, because I know this is 100% false.
If it's 100% false please explain this.
http://www.contattonews.it/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/firefox-elimina-il-dialogo-per-user-account-control-uac-da-windows.png
Or this.
http://www.bleepstatic.com/tutorials/windows-8/restore-start-menu/uac-prompt.png
Or how about one of Microsoft's own programs prompting the user ?
http://www.ed.ac.uk/polopoly_fs/1.119714!/fileManager/uac.png
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Granting the application elevation right, by allowing the application at the UAC prompt, means that you give is Admin rights.
So you would suggest every developer, indie game publisher, everyone who makes freeware, open source projects, and all not for profit company's pay Microsoft upward of £100 per year.
Where do you suggest they get the money to pay for Authenticode Certificates ? just so the user doesn't get a UAC prompt, that may i point out you denied happened in your previous sentence.
One moment you are saying "Application don't show UAC prompt." then in your next breath you say "allowing the application at the UAC prompt" Either the application is or it isn't prompting the user, please make your mind up.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Already compromised system. NEXT!
Well that doesn't negate the fact that you claimed..
"UAC is part of Windows security system, and can't be disabled."
The link i provided clearly states, Malware turns off Windows' UAC, warns Microsoft.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Not my problem. Use common sense. Download and run thing from trusted site.
If you want to run image.jpg.exe, that is not my problem, nor Windows.
The same way, as if a person does not know how to use Linux, and follow false post or article on the internet that says to format the computer or install a malware software, for something else. Windows and Linux and any OS, can just do so much against protecting the user unintended action. Windows RT is an example of how to fix that. But you see, it doesn't do to well with people. calling it enclosed environment. Well... what do you want.
What you mean like trusted sources such as Microsoft them selves, or Mozilla, and countless other developers who have to pay for Authenticode certification, and then have to sit twiddling their thumbs until one is issued.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Where did I insult you?
Right here...
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Ok Corky you are being an idiot.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/idiot
Quote:
1.Informal. an utterly foolish or senseless person: If you think you can wear that outfit to a job interview and get hired, you're an idiot!
2.Psychology . (no longer in technical use; considered offensive) a person of the lowest order in a former and discarded classification of mental retardation, having a mental age of less than three years old and an intelligence quotient under 25.
If you can't get your point across without throwing insults and being offensive, maybe you need to learn some manners or possibly think twice before posting next time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Wait, what?!? :)

UAC pops up only when a program wants to make changes to your computer. It says so in the little window. That is not a normal scenario; that is a please-sit-up-and-take-notice scenario. Do you wish to let it, user? You clicked yes? Ow, big mistake!

There is no known failsafe against PEBCAK.
So you suggest that no one ever make changes to their computer, never installs software, never runs notepad, should they just sit there and look at it ?
ffjason 18th April 2014, 09:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cthippo
If you can't get something minimally working in 4 hours, then there is a problem.

I'm sorry but your 4 hours of "not working" came from you changing a setting to a non-recommended level.

So you are the one preventing Windows 8 from working.... congratulations.
Nexxo 18th April 2014, 10:30 Quote
Quote:
Those are not applications; they are programs that aim to make changes to your computer. See the difference?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
So you would suggest every developer, indie game publisher, everyone who makes freeware, open source projects, and all not for profit company's pay Microsoft upward of £100 per year.
Where do you suggest they get the money to pay for Authenticode Certificates ? just so the user doesn't get a UAC prompt, that may i point out you denied happened in your previous sentence.
One moment you are saying "Application don't show UAC prompt." then in your next breath you say "allowing the application at the UAC prompt" Either the application is or it isn't prompting the user, please make your mind up.
Now who is arguing semantics! Applications that perform a function (like Word, like games, like PhotoShop) do not invoke UAC because they don't make changes to the OS. Programs that do make such changes invoke UAC.

And indie programs can still run without Authenticode; users just have to make the conscious decision to let them --and accept the risks involved. It's the price you pay for an open OS. If they don't feel confident enough to do that, they better stick inside the walled garden.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Well that doesn't negate the fact that you claimed..
"UAC is part of Windows security system, and can't be disabled."
The link i provided clearly states, Malware turns off Windows' UAC, warns Microsoft.
Only if you allow it UAC in the first place.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
What you mean like trusted sources such as Microsoft them selves, or Mozilla, and countless other developers who have to pay for Authenticode certification, and then have to sit twiddling their thumbs until one is issued.
Not at all. Their programs can still run --user just has to click "Allow" on UAC --and accept the risk.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
So you suggest that no one ever make changes to their computer, never installs software, never runs notepad, should they just sit there and look at it ?

Sure they can. They just should know what they're doing and accept the risk that they might not.

In my life I have blown up one C64, screwed up my OS several times, fried one CPU, electrocuted myself three times, had my PC infected once. Miraculously I have not yet drowned it in coolant. But you know, I'm a modder. I'm careful and I accept the risk.

Be careful. Be very, very careful. This ride is not for the weak.

--the Game Cat, in Vurt by Jeff Noon
Gareth Halfacree 18th April 2014, 10:50 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Those are not applications; they are programs that aim to make changes to your computer. See the difference?
Application: a program or piece of software designed to fulfil a particular purpose. Program: a series of coded software instructions to control the operation of a computer or other machine. A program designed to install some software, as in the above UAC dialogue, is an application - a program or piece of software designed to fulfil a particular purpose, to whit the installation of more software.

Now, as it happens, I agree that UAC shouldn't trigger unless an application - word chosen carefully there - actually attempts to make changes to the system that require administrative privileges; that doesn't make applications that do suddenly not be applications any more, though.

See also: "security feature" versus "security system." A security system built into Windows is a security feature of Windows; attempts to draw a line between the two phrases is disingenuous.
Nexxo 18th April 2014, 11:00 Quote
I knew this was going to happen (because hey, this is Bit-Tech! :p). I was trying to explain the difference between an application that does something on the computer, and an application that does something to the computer.

It is simple: let an application do something to your computer = accept the risk. Don't feel confident to? Don't let it mess with your computer. If you do allow it, it's on your own head.
Gareth Halfacree 18th April 2014, 11:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
I was trying to explain the difference between an application that does something on the computer, and an application that does something to the computer.
And that sentence is a much better way of doing that than confusing the matter by trying to claim that not all applications are programs or vice-versa!
Nexxo 18th April 2014, 11:15 Quote
Whoa, I'm not. All applications are programs, but not all programs are applications. Now I agree that you can argue that an installer or, say, registry cleaner is an application that makes changes to your PC.
Gareth Halfacree 18th April 2014, 11:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Whoa, I'm not.
Yes, you did. You perhaps didn't mean to, but you did. Your post began:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Those are not applications; they are programs that aim to make changes to your computer.
(My emphasis.)

That was my complaint with your post: every single one of those UAC dialogues refers to an application asking permissions to make changes to the operating system. Thus "those are not applications" is, in fact, untrue.
Corky42 18th April 2014, 12:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Those are not applications; they are programs that aim to make changes to your computer. See the difference?
Between an application and a program ? not really, but i do see the difference between software that does or doesn't want to make changes to the computer. But seeing as something like notepad.exe would cause a UAC prompt I'm not sure judging what does or doesn't make changes to the computer works.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Now who is arguing semantics! Applications that perform a function (like Word, like games, like PhotoShop) do not invoke UAC because they don't make changes to the OS. Programs that do make such changes invoke UAC.
You mean like Notepad.exe ? or Calc.exe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
And indie programs can still run without Authenticode; users just have to make the conscious decision to let them --and accept the risks involved. It's the price you pay for an open OS. If they don't feel confident enough to do that, they better stick inside the walled garden.
And that brings us back around to the details i posted to refute GoodBytes original claim that UAC "is a system to provide a serious level of protection which so far has not been by-passed since it's introduction in Vista (good work Microsoft)" And i still refute the claim that UAC can't be disabled or by-passed.
GoodBytes 18th April 2014, 12:40 Quote
Notepad and calc does not prompt UAC, even when UAC is set at the highest level.
I am still waiting for that video...
Quote:

And that brings us back around to the details i posted to refute GoodBytes original claim that UAC "is a system to provide a serious level of protection which so far has not been by-passed since it's introduction in Vista (good work Microsoft)" And i still refute the claim that UAC can't be disabled or by-passed.
That is just something you choose to not believe, despite the facts
SchizoFrog 18th April 2014, 12:54 Quote
I find it funny but not surprising that such an argument, with so much finger pointing has ensued and yet there has been not a single suggested solution to my original problem. That Office would not install once I updated to 8.1 due to it's statement that I needed to be an Admin.
GoodBytes 18th April 2014, 13:02 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
I find it funny but not surprising that such an argument, with so much finger pointing has ensued and yet there has been not a single suggested solution to my original problem. That Office would not install once I updated to 8.1 due to it's statement that I needed to be an Admin.

Turn on UAC, restart, and run the setup.
And you said that you switched to Win7. So does it mater?
Corky42 18th April 2014, 13:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Notepad and calc does not prompt UAC, even when UAC is set at the highest level.
I am still waiting for that video...


That is just something you choose to not believe, despite the facts
Then explain...
http://www.optimiz3.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/notepad-uac-warning.png
And
http://www.neowin.net/forum/uploads/monthly_02_2011/post-14624-0-16337000-1297267944.jpg

And if you think I'm going to make a video just because you refuse to believe that UAC can be disabled or by-passed, you are going to have a long wait as I'm not inclined to go to the bother for someone who shows such a lack of manners.

Perhaps if you weren't so offensive and rude to people, telling them they are idiots, and how they "were just trying to find an excuse" and "your parents are stuck with WIn7 due to your close mind set." you may find people react more positively to your demands.

If you want further proof have a browse through Microsoft's patching history for every time they mention elevated privileges, because every single one of those security flaws could have bypassed UAC.
GoodBytes 18th April 2014, 13:40 Quote
Those are pictures you got from the internet. Not your system.
There is a content behind it. For example, the notepad one could be instructions to write a files in a Windows system folder. So to that, one way, is to run Notepad as elevated credentials. The calc one, was probably the user showing the UAC dialog box how it looks like, and just happened to to pick this program.

I have not insulted you, nor called you an idiot.
SchizoFrog 18th April 2014, 14:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
I find it funny but not surprising that such an argument, with so much finger pointing has ensued and yet there has been not a single suggested solution to my original problem. That Office would not install once I updated to 8.1 due to it's statement that I needed to be an Admin.

Turn on UAC, restart, and run the setup.
And you said that you switched to Win7. So does it mater?

Done, didn't make a difference, next suggestion please or is that the sum total of your attempts at being helpful?. As for it mattering, of course it matters. There is a serious problem to be resolved for future reference.
Nexxo 18th April 2014, 14:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Yes, you did. You perhaps didn't mean to, but you did.

Didn't mean to. I stand corrected. :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
You mean like Notepad.exe ? or Calc.exe
Does that happen on your PC? Because it never happened on my Vista or Win8 install.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
And that brings us back around to the details i posted to refute GoodBytes original claim that UAC "is a system to provide a serious level of protection which so far has not been by-passed since it's introduction in Vista (good work Microsoft)" And i still refute the claim that UAC can't be disabled or by-passed.

It can't without user consent.

But that doesn't help schizofrog.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
Done, didn't make a difference, next suggestion please or is that the sum total of your attempts at being helpful?. As for it mattering, of course it matters. There is a serious problem to be resolved for future reference.

You're right. Let's try the following:

Open command prompt in Admin mode. Type: net user administrator /active: yes

See if that helps.

Alternatively, something may have screwed with the permissions of the Start Menu folder.

go to:

C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu

right click Programs folder, go to properties, go to the security tab, click edit

click the "Everyone' group, check full control. make sure the boxes are all populated with checkmarks, hit apply, then OK, then OK

now open the Programs folder

if the folder "Microsoft Office 2013" does not exist, then create one;

open "Microsoft Office 2013" directory

inside of it, create "Office 2013 Tools"

now try to install office again as Admin.
Corky42 18th April 2014, 14:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Those are pictures you got from the internet. Not your system.
There is a content behind it. For example, the notepad one could be instructions to write a files in a Windows system folder. So to that, one way, is to run Notepad as elevated credentials. The calc one, was probably the user showing the UAC dialog box how it looks like, and just happened to to pick this program.

I have not insulted you, nor called you an idiot.

Selective memory much ? Let me refresh it for you...
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodBytes
Ok Corky you are being an idiot.
If that is not calling someone an idiot IDK what is.

And you have still failed to address all the other means of by-passing UAC or disabling it, such as all the security patches Microsoft have issued that address what you are claiming has never been done. And all the other articles i provided giving details on how it is possible to by-pass or disable UAC.
SchizoFrog 18th April 2014, 15:12 Quote
Thanks Nexxo, I shall make a note of those suggestions and try them out at some point soon. Oh, and it is Office 2007 by the way. :)

Ultimately though, I don't see why I should have to play around with cmd prompt and other complicated methods just to install software made and authorised by Microsoft themselves.
SchizoFrog 18th April 2014, 15:13 Quote
P.S. Bit-Tech, I still don't like being bounced in to the forums each time I comment. :(
Nexxo 18th April 2014, 17:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
Thanks Nexxo, I shall make a note of those suggestions and try them out at some point soon. Oh, and it is Office 2007 by the way. :)

Ultimately though, I don't see why I should have to play around with cmd prompt and other complicated methods just to install software made and authorised by Microsoft themselves.

It's certainly not what is supposed to happen. Most of the time I have an effortless install, but I too have occasionally run into problems. C'est la vie d'ordinateur... :)
leexgx 19th April 2014, 04:31 Quote
really what was the point of doing a war in this topic (cant imagine how many pages there are on the forum view)

and to clear things up
turning off UAC makes all programs run as admin with no prompt for admin its up to the program to call for admin but if UAC is off then the app is all ready running as admin level all ready (unless the account is a standard account), also system level changes the app must understand it needs admin so if it does not call for admin to make UAC trigger then you get the normal fail to save changes bla bla message if the app is very old, if UAC is off the program was all ready started with full admin rights so it can do whatever it once

calc or notepad should not be showing yellow on a certified program(unless its been modified)

-------------------------------------------------------------

somewhere in the upgrade to windows 8.1 something broke

next time when you do the upgrade to windows 8.1 you Only need to install 2 windows updates to make the upgrade show in the app store (currently its KB2871389 and KB2917499 but that may change > http://windows.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows-8/why-can-t-find-update-store )

personally its faster to install start menu classic and let the customer deal with windows 8 updates unless they have a i3 cpu maybe i do the updates (i just advise them to do the updates,if they ignore the upgrade nag box its not my issue) this is what i do now as loading windows 7 on a windows 8 laptop i found to be annoying (as they make sure they use parts that windows 7 has No drivers for on windows update any way)

you can install windows 7 and be done with it or load a "copy" of windows 8.1 (or windows 8.1 update 1.... once a slipstreamed version come out) and make windows activated, it can be installed under same time as windows 7 install

i do hate MS for NOT letting you install a fresh free copy of windows 8.1 on a OEM laptop that has a windows 8 OEM BIOS KEY, you have to install windows 8 then upgrade it to windows 8.1 and then install windows update 1 how stupid, (takes about 7-3 hours depending if its a shity amd E type bobcat cpu that some users are getting or if its a intel i3 cpu,, the E type cpus HATE .NET)

windows 7 i just use a slipstreamed disk(use the Key on the system) that has most of the updates till 0-3 months ago so i only have to install 5-15 updates i can have a system fully ready in under 1 hour (from blank pc no OS)

if MS keeps up with this i can see us all running macs so the UI stays consistant, windows 7 was an improvement and listened to there user base and was a massive improvement all windows had to do was do what they did under the hud on the currant mess on win8 and slap windows 8 on it (official version would be 6.2 or 6.3) they would of been sold lots and every one would of been happy (they could of added an app store or optionally the metro app interface)

windows 8 is like ok we will screw over 80% of are user base and make drastic UI change that makes 2 UI's in one OS, with the main one that most users basic features been removed (start menu and other things) and then Screw over corp customers with mandatory updates, i would dread to use windows 8 in a corp set up the cost to re train there monkeys to do Very basic tasks (how to get back to desktop when your stuck on a green screen) would cost them a lot of money compared to just moving to windows 7
Corky42 19th April 2014, 08:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by leexgx
really what was the point of doing a war in this topic (cant imagine how many pages there are on the forum view)

Because this is Bit-Tech :?
And only 2.
Nexxo 19th April 2014, 13:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by leexgx
really what was the point of doing a war in this topic

*continues rant about how awful Windows 8 is...

:p
leexgx 20th April 2014, 03:16 Quote
but not dedicating it to a user who could not install office after a failed windows 8.1 upgrade

the problem with window vista was Drivers problems (and superfetch making high disk i/o and system restore/shadow copy service) with windows 8 is UI change and broke a load of stuff as well and high disk I/O usage sometimes (windows update and metro update seems to be competing making a temporary UAC launch deadlock for 2-15 mins until it finishes whatever it is doing)

i have found it very rare to find a windows 7 computer to poo on itself unless it was user inflicted or hardware issue (force power off when doing windows update, has a 50/50 chance of braking something if you do that)

all i am saying is if they made windows 8 as an upgrade to windows 7 (like what they did from vista to 7) make it all flashy like apple does with their minor updates + features that the user does Not have to use (every 2-3 years), all they had to do was under the hood fixes like vista to 7 and add an Optional App store job done, you do Not just do a Drastic UI change in one pop, windows 8 is like going from well windows OS to a blackberry playbook (hidden gestures)

i am still contemplating if i should bother with windows 8.1 "+what ever update we are on now" on my new system i am going to be buying hopefully soon, but as i can deal with it and i have an SSD its not as much an issue personally to use windows 8 (once startisback or start8 or start menu classic is installed that is)
Corky42 20th April 2014, 07:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by leexgx
windows 7 i just use a slipstreamed disk(use the Key on the system) that has most of the updates till 0-3 months ago so i only have to install 5-15 updates i can have a system fully ready in under 1 hour (from blank pc no OS)
AFAIK you can still slipstream Windows 8.1 and the Update into the original Windows 8 source.
IIRC you can even download a Windows 8.1 ISO, although it takes a bit of faffing around.
Quote:
Originally Posted by leexgx
but not dedicating it to a user who could not install office after a failed windows 8.1 upgrade
Isn't that what this section of the forums is used for ?
leexgx 20th April 2014, 19:37 Quote
but if the OEM BIOS key is windows 8 you have to load windows 8 first before you can use windows 8.1 upgrade (unless you can slipstream a windows 8.1 upgrade that accepts a windows 8 Bios key not tried)

the other part was 20 posts dedicated to first post about issue (this is a main page topic)
Corky42 21st April 2014, 07:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by leexgx
but if the OEM BIOS key is windows 8 you have to load windows 8 first before you can use windows 8.1 upgrade (unless you can slipstream a windows 8.1 upgrade that accepts a windows 8 Bios key not tried)

You can use one of the generic keys Microsoft provide and then enter the Bios key when it comes to activating.
Some more details here. http://www.askvg.com/fix-windows-8-genuine-product-key-doesnt-work-for-windows-8-1-clean-installation/
leexgx 21st April 2014, 20:29 Quote
i have a play with it when i have got a day to waste on it, but nice to know
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