bit-tech.net

Microsoft joins Open Compute Project

Microsoft joins Open Compute Project

Microsoft has officially joined the Open Compute Project, offering its internal server specification blueprints with claims of a 40 per cent cost reduction and 15 per cent efficiency gain over traditional designs.

Microsoft has announced that it is officially throwing its lot in with the Open Compute Project, making its cloud computing technologies available to all in order to boost efficiency.

Founded by Facebook as a means of encouraging cross-vendor support for improving the efficiency of its data centres, the Open Compute Project has already seen some major contributions from its various members. Early last year, AMD and Intel announced the Open 3.0 modular server design and a new silcon photonics interconnect respectively, publishing information on the technologies to the project's publicly-accessible GitHub page for all to view.

Now, Microsoft is joining the project, and brings an offering of its own to the table: hardware designs from its own data centres which power the Azure, Office 365 and Bing web-based services. 'The Microsoft cloud server specification essentially provides the blueprints for the data centre servers we have designed to deliver the world’s most diverse portfolio of cloud services,' claimed Microsoft's Bill Laing, corporate vice president, of the move. 'They offer dramatic improvements over traditional enterprise server designs: up to 40 per cent server cost savings, 15 per cent power efficiency gains and 50 per cent reduction in deployment and service times. We also expect this server design to contribute to our environmental sustainability efforts by reducing network cabling by 1,100 miles and metal by 10,000 tons across our base of 1 million servers.'

By publishing the plans through the Open Compute Project, Microsoft allows anyone - including its competitors - to benefit from its engineering work and improve their own infrastructure, but it's not giving away the crown jewels: the company's designs are tailored specifically for Windows Server software, meaning anyone wanting to get up and running with the high-efficiency architecture as quickly as possible will be tied in to the company's proprietary software platform.

Details of Microsoft's contributions to the project are due to be published on the official website following the conclusion of the Open Compute Summit tomorrow.

11 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Star*Dagger 28th January 2014, 18:05 Quote
Windows and the word efficiency in the same sentence that is rich.
mi1ez 28th January 2014, 21:33 Quote
Windows doesn't run in Microsoft's cloud. Well, not yet anyway.
Nexxo 28th January 2014, 22:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
Windows and the word efficiency in the same sentence that is rich.

The price you pay for backward compatibility across millions of different configurations of PC.

If you want an OS with the snug fit of a bespoke tailored suit, buy an Apple Mac.
ch424 28th January 2014, 22:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mi1ez
Windows doesn't run in Microsoft's cloud. Well, not yet anyway.

I thought you could create windows VMs on Azure?
Bauul 29th January 2014, 02:22 Quote
Microsoft's Server business is apparently doing brilliantly. I was speaking to someone who works on tracking the success of their server department and he was saying, somewhat unusually, their server software and architecture is apparently pretty world class. Makes something of a change!
dyzophoria 29th January 2014, 02:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
Windows and the word efficiency in the same sentence that is rich.

windows server is quite efficient honestly starting with the kernel revamp of 2008, a bare core server installation operates quite well, moreover with 2012, a properly built linux kernel is still better of course, but it is not way off.
dyzophoria 29th January 2014, 02:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mi1ez
Windows doesn't run in Microsoft's cloud. Well, not yet anyway.

was this suppose to be sarcasm? or the over 20 Windows Virtual Machines we have on Azure running on magic fairy dust?
Bindibadgi 29th January 2014, 03:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Star*Dagger
Windows and the word efficiency in the same sentence that is rich.

Agree with Nex on the general statement, but maybe their Office team could get some tips
Nexxo 29th January 2014, 09:03 Quote
Well, yeah, Office is a nice example of organic growth: new stuff gets bolted onto old stuff as things move along. A bit like evolution. Office could do with a total rewrite from the ground up, but chances are that will break backward file compatibility (its file structure makes no sense whatsoever) and users will start bleating again.
Bindibadgi 29th January 2014, 09:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexxo
Well, yeah, Office is a nice example of organic growth: new stuff gets bolted onto old stuff as things move along. A bit like evolution. Office could do with a total rewrite from the ground up, but chances are that will break backward file compatibility (its file structure makes no sense whatsoever) and users will start bleating again.

You only need backward compatibility for the save/open engine. They changed in 07, they can change now
Nexxo 29th January 2014, 09:56 Quote
Perhaps with Office Gemini we'll get the rewrite (in WinRT) that we're waiting for. Shouldn't be hard to make a parallel desktop GUI version based on the same code.
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums