bit-tech.net

Wireless power 'superlens' extends range significantly

Wireless power 'superlens' extends range significantly

The wireless power superlens

A team of engineers from Duke University has demonstrated a new technology that greatly extends the range and efficiency of wireless power transfer.

The so-called 'superlens' uses a grid of copper coils that act in unison to focus the magnetic field created by each onto a single point. The intensity of the magnetic field follows a cone-like pattern with the point of the cone representing the highest level of induction.

The new method allows for wireless power transfer to not only have a greater range but also be more efficient, with existing solutions for range extension relying on large coils or higher power output.

Although the current prototype is large and has a fixed focus Yaroslav Urzhumov, assistant research professor of electrical and computer engineering at Duke University, says the technology could be refined for use in much smaller devices and that it could use a variable focus. With these refinements he hopes the technology could be used to, for instance, charge mobile devices as they move around in a room.

“The true functionality that consumers want and expect from a useful wireless power system is the ability to charge a device wherever it is – not simply to charge it without a cable,” said Urzhumov.

“Previous commercial products like the PowerMat™ have not become a standard solution exactly for that reason; they lock the user to a certain area or region where transmission works, which, in effect, puts invisible strings on the device and hence on the user. It is those strings - not just the wires - that we want to get rid of.”

Link: Duke University

11 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
hyperion 15th January 2014, 23:07 Quote
This is really interesting because if this technology was implemented everywhere then gadgets would simply operate like they were permanently plugged in and batteries would be like auxiliary units that would only come into use when in nature. If it's powerful enough maybe they could lay the technology down on the streets and electric city cars could operate without the current autonomy limitations of fuel cells/batteries, and even lose the weight of those batteries entirely.

Does it have any effect on animals, like frying your brain or anything?
desertstalker 16th January 2014, 07:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperion

Does it have any effect on animals, like frying your brain or anything?

At the power intensity needed to do more than slowly charge a phone, probably.
Corky42 16th January 2014, 09:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertstalker
At the power intensity needed to do more than slowly charge a phone, probably.

Not sure where people get this idea, wireless power doesn't send electrical current through the air. Maybe they should have called it electromagnetic power as that is what most wireless power uses, an electromagnetic field cause the coil in the receiving device to generate voltage.

At worst you may find your keys or other metallic things sticking to the charging unit.
crudbreeder 16th January 2014, 09:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertstalker
At the power intensity needed to do more than slowly charge a phone, probably.

Not sure where people get this idea, wireless power doesn't send electrical current through the air. Maybe they should have called it electromagnetic power as that is what most wireless power uses, an electromagnetic field cause the coil in the receiving device to generate voltage.

At worst you may find your keys or other metallic things sticking to the charging unit.

But the electromagnetic field is what fries your brain, just like a microwave oven.
RichCreedy 16th January 2014, 09:39 Quote
electromagnetic field is just a magnetic field produced by a few electrons moving through a wire, it is no different than a magnetic field produced by a magnet other than it moves. a much larger magnetic field is produced by the earths metal core.

as for the microwave, that works by radiation which vibrates water molecules to heat things. this radiation is produced by a magnetron
Corky42 16th January 2014, 09:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by crudbreeder
But the electromagnetic field is what fries your brain, just like a microwave oven.
You don't get you brain fried when you go in a MRI and that uses a much more powerful magnetic field, you seem to be confusing magnetic fields with radio waves.
ModSquid 16th January 2014, 10:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Quote:
Originally Posted by crudbreeder
But the electromagnetic field is what fries your brain, just like a microwave oven.
You don't get you brain fried when you go in a MRI and that uses a much more powerful magnetic field, you seem to be confusing magnetic fields with radio waves.

But can you catch it from toilet seats?
Alecto 17th January 2014, 21:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ModSquid
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Quote:
Originally Posted by crudbreeder
But the electromagnetic field is what fries your brain, just like a microwave oven.
You don't get you brain fried when you go in a MRI and that uses a much more powerful magnetic field, you seem to be confusing magnetic fields with radio waves.

But can you catch it from toilet seats?

Exclusively.
Bonedoctor 18th January 2014, 10:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Quote:
Originally Posted by crudbreeder
But the electromagnetic field is what fries your brain, just like a microwave oven.
You don't get you brain fried when you go in a MRI and that uses a much more powerful magnetic field, you seem to be confusing magnetic fields with radio waves.

No, but it does heat things up, especially any metal implants
Corky42 18th January 2014, 11:03 Quote
Like i said a MRI is much more powerful, around 5,000 to 30,000 gauss.
If we get to the stage of needing LN2 to cool the electromagnets in an inductive charging loop we will have more to worry about than heating up metal implants.
siliconfanatic 19th January 2014, 19:14 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Like i said a MRI is much more powerful, around 5,000 to 30,000 gauss.
If we get to the stage of needing LN2 to cool the electromagnets in an inductive charging loop we will have more to worry about than heating up metal implants.
Such as batteries exploding like a miniature nuke from being overcharged by unheard of proportions?
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums