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Adobe releases patches for critical Flash, AIR vulnerabilities

Adobe releases patches for critical Flash, AIR vulnerabilities

The latest patches for Adobe's Flash and AIR packages fix some serious vulnerabilities - so it's a good idea to install them as soon as possible, we'd say.

Adobe has released a critical patch for its Flash and AIR applications, following the discovery of yet more serious security vulnerabilities in the software.

Affecting users of Windows, Macintosh, Linux, Chrome OS and Android, the flaws include four memory corruption vulnerabilities, an integer overflow vulnerability, and a cross-domain information leakage issue. The result is a storm of flaws which can turn a system's security into Swiss cheese.

In its notification regarding the updates, Adobe admitted to the seriousness of the issues. 'These updates address vulnerabilities that could case a crash,' the company explained, 'and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.'

That latter, of course, is the key: while system crashes are irritating, the flaws in Flash and AIR mean that an attacker could potentially load a malicious file into a website and automatically execute arbitrary code on visiting systems - potentially taking full control of the targets with very little effort.

The updates come just one week after Adobe patched another flaw in Flash following the discovery that the flaw was being exploited in the wild to attack systems, albeit in what the company described as a 'limited' manner - a claim security vendor Symantec disputes, having blocked a claimed 1,300 attacks using the vulnerability since the 10th of August.

The patches for Android are of special interest: the company recently removed its Adobe Flash Player application from the Google Play store, after deciding to cease development on the platform. As a result, new devices are unable to install the software - but any device with an existing installation will still receive the update, Adobe has confirmed.

The updates area available to download from Adobe now, and we'd certainly recommend that you do so if you value your system's security.

11 Comments

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rollo 22nd August 2012, 12:00 Quote
the winner for the most patched program on earth

Adobe Flash
mi1ez 22nd August 2012, 12:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by rollo
the winner for the most patched program on earth

Adobe Flash
The winner of the most patches still needed...
lp rob1 22nd August 2012, 12:10 Quote
Can we just leave Flash to die and move on to HTML5? Youtube has converted, but most other sites - like Flash game sites - still only use Flash. Adobe themselves are practically forcing people to stop using Flash themselves - dropping Linux support, removing the Flash app for Android etc. It seems that even Adobe want to get rid of this aging technology!
PingCrosby 22nd August 2012, 13:48 Quote
'four memory corruption vulnerabilities, an integer overflow vulnerability, and a cross-domain information leakage issue'..... I only went to the GP for a check-up and this is exactly what he diagnosed me with as well
dyzophoria 22nd August 2012, 15:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by lp rob1
Can we just leave Flash to die and move on to HTML5? Youtube has converted, but most other sites - like Flash game sites - still only use Flash. Adobe themselves are practically forcing people to stop using Flash themselves - dropping Linux support, removing the Flash app for Android etc. It seems that even Adobe want to get rid of this aging technology!

im guessing adobe knows this as well, they know flash is aging, until then they cannot do much but try to update it since a lot still uses it. ie6 cough* cough*
GoodBytes 22nd August 2012, 16:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by lp rob1
Can we just leave Flash to die and move on to HTML5? Youtube has converted, but most other sites - like Flash game sites - still only use Flash. Adobe themselves are practically forcing people to stop using Flash themselves - dropping Linux support, removing the Flash app for Android etc. It seems that even Adobe want to get rid of this aging technology!

When HTML5 will works properly, then you can suggest that. So far it doesn't, and crashes web browsers. Since YouTube implement HTML5 program, they can't visit youTube anymore as it crashes sometimes. Where they use Opera, Chrome or Firefox. I keep telling people to go to youtube.com/html5, and click to opt out, so that it uses Flash. And youtube isn't this exception. About all web sites that uses HTML5 videos creates headaches. HTML5 is extremely far from ready.
MrJay 22nd August 2012, 16:21 Quote
Just finished imaging 600 odd windows 7 machines over 3 sites. 3rd year in a row Adobe have waited until we have just about finished with the yearly image before deciding its massively broken : (
dicobalt 23rd August 2012, 08:42 Quote
Anyone else notice that Win8 refuses to update Flash for IE? The Adobe Flash download webpage tells me to enable compatibility view lists in IE (which already are enabled) but Windows Update doesn't install a new Flash like it is supposed to. If you manually download the Active X version of Flash it won't install in Win8. I wish I could say it was a software glitch only on my one PC but this happens in my desktop's virtual machines as well as on my laptop. So right now there is no way to manually update IE's Flash on Win8...
Kacela 23rd August 2012, 12:25 Quote
This is a good thing, as it will only accelerate the development and acceptance of HTML5. I love developing in Flex/Air/Flash, but it's time to move on.
Jhodas 23rd August 2012, 13:29 Quote
That is a horrific list of vulnerabilities...
Griffter 24th August 2012, 10:25 Quote
3rd paragraph - "vulnerabilities that could case a crash", should it not be "cause a crash" :-)
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