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Get a job at Asus UK

Get a job at Asus UK

Turn your hobby into a career.

The UK office of Asus, the world's largest motherboard manufacturer, is looking for a full-time Product Marketing Specialist to join its team.

The Product Marketing Specialist will assist the Marketing and PR Manager in the day-to-day administration of all marketing functions. The role is ideally suited to a recent graduate with a relevant degree. This is a replacement role, and the level of responsibility will undoubtedly increase within a year.

Responsibilities

  • Submitting marketing expenditure applications online (overall plan will be provided)
  • Liaising with sales dept and advertisers on media plans, advertising and invoicing
  • Analysis of advertising reports for improvement
  • Liaising with designers on creation of adverts (print/online)
  • Managing point of sale materials for resellers
  • Analysis of priority media for review/PR
  • Organising events and preparation of all materials/demo equipment
  • Managing events schedule and ensuring all parties informed of responsibilities/requirements
  • Preparation of event reports for HQ discussion

Skills/Qualifications

  • Excellent interpersonal skills
  • Extremely well-organised and proactive
  • Full UK driving licence

Essential Soft Skills

  • The successful individual will be confident and able to engage across all levels and all functions
  • Strong verbal, written and formal presentation skills will be required
  • A strong character able to negotiate effectively
  • Able to perform effectively while 'juggling' a number of balls
  • Basic understanding of UK media

Desirable Skills

  • IT literacy
  • Attention to detail and good numeracy skills

The role is based in the UK office of Asus, which is in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire. The salary range is between £18,000 and £22,000 per annum.

Interested applications should email hr_uk@asus.com, and include a covering letter and CV.

Good to luck to any bit-tech readers who apply.

84 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Fod 16th November 2011, 16:23 Quote
£18k/year? since when did graduate roles start that low?
Kyndylan 16th November 2011, 16:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fod
£18k/year? since when did graduate roles start that low?

Since tens of thousands of graduates can't find any job at all...
Canon 16th November 2011, 16:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fod
£18k/year? since when did graduate roles start that low?

Ideally suited to, not limited to. It doesn't take a graduate to carry those responsibilities, that salary sounds about right to me.
faugusztin 16th November 2011, 16:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fod
£18k/year? since when did graduate roles start that low?

/me saddly looks at my 13k€/year netto sallary for programming job :D.
Hustler 16th November 2011, 16:50 Quote
"which is in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire"


Lol...unless you already live there, anyone want to tell me how your supposed to afford anywhere to live in that part of the world on £18-22K..?

I suppose you could always take a tent and sleeping bag, and set up in the company car park..setting up tents on private land is in vogue these days..:))
andrew8200m 16th November 2011, 17:06 Quote
Wages in IT industry are not ideal at the moment as the UK customer base wants cheap cheap cheap driving down profits, and ultimately down the line wages for those in the industry.
true_gamer 16th November 2011, 17:13 Quote
It's never right, considering I earn 2.5x that for driving a Tanker....But then I do have allot of responsibility!
[PUNK] crompers 16th November 2011, 17:36 Quote
Just took a job for 14k 40 hour week , graduated this summer. I'm happy, its a job, one the lads on my course works 60 hours a week delivering pizzas for dominos and makes less money. Welcome to 2011
Fused 16th November 2011, 17:53 Quote
For a non London based graduate job that doesnt sound so bad given todays climate. As someone pointed out above they may take a non graduate. Average starting salary to me seemed to be about £25k for graduates during my degree but I think its skewed alot by those who jobs are based in London or those in the finance sector.

I am pretty sure you could live off that salary fairly ok. Might be a bit tight depending on how you live your lifestyle but a job is better than no job
DriftCarl 16th November 2011, 18:00 Quote
Just because you have a degree, doesnt automatically give you the right to a 40k a year job.
Had 3 people at work start within the last 6 months, 2 of them have a computer related degree, the other was an enthusiastic youngster just finished his A levels. 6 months later the one without a degree is by far better at his job than the other 2, just such a damn shame that the other 2 are being paid more because of their "degree". University is sooo overrated.
true_gamer 16th November 2011, 18:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fused
job is better than no job

How do you work that out? Seems to me that allot of people know how to play the system, and live off US, the TAX payers.

Knowing how to play the system can result in you living in a large house, with a income of £30K PA in benefits.

And it's also these people that don't have to worry when they get old and get put in a nursing home, Because US as the TAX payer, will pay for it, As well as their funeral when they pass.

So US who pay the taxes get screwed over all the time. When we get old, we would have to sell our house to pay for the nursing home. Use are savings to pay for our funeral (Otherwise it will be left to the kids).

So no job is better than a job if you know how to play the system!
Yslen 16th November 2011, 18:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by true_gamer
It's never right, considering I earn 2.5x that for driving a Tanker....But then I do have allot of responsibility!

Yowza. Screw physics, where do I train for that job? :D
XXAOSICXX 16th November 2011, 18:12 Quote
Bit Tech saying thanks to ASUS for spending a fortune in advertising on the site...

...since when did Bit Tech start running job ads for people?

"Turn your hobby into a career." <- yeah, sure, if your hobby is devising marketing plans :S

What a load of rubbish.
Canon 16th November 2011, 18:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by true_gamer
How do you work that out? Seems to me that allot of people know how to play the system, and live off US, the TAX payers.

Knowing how to play the system can result in you living in a large house, with a income of £30K PA in benefits.

And it's also these people that don't have to worry when they get old and get put in a nursing home, Because US as the TAX payer, will pay for it, As well as their funeral when they pass.

So US who pay the taxes get screwed over all the time. When we get old, we would have to sell our house to pay for the nursing home. Use are savings to pay for our funeral (Otherwise it will be left to the kids).

So no job is better than a job if you know how to play the system!

That's why some of us go to work and accept wages that barely keep us. Because we have a morale fibre left in our bodies.

There aren't as many benefit cheats out there as The Sun or The Daily Mirror would have you believe, definitely not so in contrast to those that need them to avoid homelessness and serious illness or even in severe cases starvation, yes it happens at home too because some people can't even work out the system the way it is supposed to be.

It is wrong though, very wrong. But you try catching them, sifting through hundred of thousands of 'possible' cheats costs money, and guess where that money would come from?
true_gamer 16th November 2011, 18:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yslen
Yowza. Screw physics, where do I train for that job? :D

Well to start you would need to take your LGV Class 2(Rigid's), then your LGV Class 1(Artic's), A Full ADR course for In Tanks. (13 Exam papers). A Drivers CPC course (New Government bullshit Scheme to give you a NVQ level 3...). Then You would need further training on the refinery's to prove you are a sensible and competent person. Then trained up to use the tankers. (PTO, Connecting, Disconnecting, Earthing, Fittings etc). Oh and you would need at least 2yrs experience in driving a LGV(HGV) before they would even consider you driving a Dangerous Goods Vehicle....So in reality its no different, than doing a degree, although, if the **** hits the fan, your either be prosecuted, or Dead!

(So glad there wasn't a Tanker in that M5 Crash. Cause that so called fireball, would have been tiny compared to a tanker exploding!).
maverik-sg1 16th November 2011, 18:28 Quote
You know some graduates think all of a sudden they are worth a mint becuase they can 'draw a pie chart' welcome to the real world my friends - get a job!!

Also look at the bigger picture, my cousin started with global company straight out of uni on a measely £15k a year, 10yrs on, shes now a VP of sales and marketing for the Asia Pacific region for that global giant earning a mint.

My point is that everyone has to start somewhere, the job is what you make it and the potential to grow by working within a globally recognised market leader is where ambitious people start at the bottom and through hard work and success, they progress through the ranks......... it's not rocket science, but this should be recognised as one such opportunity to start a career.
warejon9 16th November 2011, 18:29 Quote
I'm an undergraduate, and most of the graduate scheme jobs in my sector (Biosciences) are around 20k per year.

People saying university is overated, well it depends, if you go to a bad uni, do a bad course and expect to earn anything yea your an idiot. However a lot of good graduates do come out of decent universities. Also there is a lot of good research that comes from universities too.
PabloFunky 16th November 2011, 18:36 Quote
Totally with Canon.

As i have morals and am not prepared to join the come to uk claim benefits and let what tax payers are left to pay them.

As i decided to save a little money im entitled to Zero benefits If i pissed it up the wall and spent the lot etc etc then could claim allsorts. (work that logic out from the uk system).

I have been working a minimum wage job(although qualified) for 2 years now as a job is a job.
Having too generally walk 4 hours a day 2 hours there and 2 hours back as the fares would eat too much into my wages.

But i dont want violins this is the way it is now.

So that Asus one dont look too bad atal to me.

The big plus for me though is im allowed wood for my pc build
Somer_Himpson 16th November 2011, 18:56 Quote
18-22K...go kiss a duck Asus!
Carrie 16th November 2011, 19:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by true_gamer
Well to start you would need to take your LGV Class 2(Rigid's), then your LGV Class 1(Artic's), A Full ADR course for In Tanks. (13 Exam papers). A Drivers CPC course (New Government bullshit Scheme to give you a NVQ level 3...). Then You would need further training on the refinery's to prove you are a sensible and competent person. Then trained up to use the tankers. (PTO, Connecting, Disconnecting, Earthing, Fittings etc). Oh and you would need at least 2yrs experience in driving a LGV(HGV) before they would even consider you driving a Dangerous Goods Vehicle....So in reality its no different, than doing a degree, although, if the **** hits the fan, your either be prosecuted, or Dead!

(So glad there wasn't a Tanker in that M5 Crash. Cause that so called fireball, would have been tiny compared to a tanker exploding!).

So after much learning, experience and years that warrants you £45k a year. Isn't this ASUS job an opportunity for someone, graduate or otherwise, just that too? An opportunity to learn and gain experience and in time to potentially elevate themselves to your lofty salary level?
veato 16th November 2011, 19:07 Quote
""Able to perform effectively while 'juggling' a number of balls""

Sounds like a job for the wife
true_gamer 16th November 2011, 19:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrie
So after much learning, experience and years that warrants you £45k a year. Isn't this ASUS an opportunity for someone, graduate or otherwise, just that too? An opportunity to learn and gain experience?


Yep, I totally agree, no different to my partner, who started from the bottom, and is now the Head veterinary Nurse/Practice Manager of a Vets earning more than me...
PabloFunky 16th November 2011, 19:26 Quote
I earn around £40k a year.

Sadly what i earn and what i get paid are two totaly separate things.
true_gamer 16th November 2011, 19:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by PabloFunky
I earn around £40k a year.

Sadly what i earn and what i get paid are two totaly separate things.

Tell me about it! £300 taxed last week, that's a weeks wage to most.
Panos 16th November 2011, 19:38 Quote
Pablo I am with you.
On £40K pa atm, and I feel I was better two years ago on different company earning £30K.
Ex wife, mortgage, and the Chancellor are getting huge cut of that, wondering if worth working 38 hours per week + 22 hours commuting.

Seems better to go back to Greece, grace sheep (in the family land), gather the olives and the almonds and go fishing. I own my house there so no mortgage either.
andrew8200m 16th November 2011, 19:40 Quote
This has met with a fair amount of negativity hasn't it... I would love a job that has many a path to follow! Not saying mine doesn't have a path as it does but what I mean is many many jobs do not.

I'll do it for a company car, at the top of that pay scale and to work "from home" with bupa, dental and flexible hours :p
yodasarmpit 16th November 2011, 19:49 Quote
£18k for a grad seems reasonable, no business knowledge and still learning.
After a few years and understanding of the business, get a placement/full time position on the salary suitable for that new role.
MrDomRocks 16th November 2011, 19:52 Quote
I left school with nothing, a levels that didnt matter and gcse's that where unusuable after four years as they expire you know.

I started my full time ocupation at nineteen. I worked from the ground up, training on the job day release at college to get an nvq. I have people with degrees look down thier noses at me. And work around students all day that talk about getting 40k a year once they graduate.

No doubt they think they are the dogs b locks. I earn good money seeing as I'm only 25. I worked hard and do an honest days work. I get my hands dirty and live in the real world.

This job isn't just about being a graduate with a degree. As stated before it's hard work and dedication. I know I deserve what I earn and the perks because I worked for them.

I'd apply for this job but it'd mean a pay cut. I don't mind the driving if it came with a vehicle as Hemel Hempstead isn't an easy drive and fueling a car isn't cheap.
Ljs 16th November 2011, 20:00 Quote
18k for a graduate is reasonable, some get more, some get less. Considering this will probably go to a Business Studies graduate, it is more than reasonable.

Some people seem to think they have inflated value for some reason.
Noob? 16th November 2011, 20:16 Quote
Good luck to those who apply for the role!
Omnituens 16th November 2011, 20:18 Quote
I hate my job, loved my last one. Sadly, QA roles are temp roles :(
Sloth 16th November 2011, 20:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yodasarmpit
£18k for a grad seems reasonable, no business knowledge and still learning.
After a few years and understanding of the business, get a placement/full time position on the salary suitable for that new role.
£18k and a a spot working for Asus? I'd be all over that if it was in the US and I wanted to work in that field! It sounds like a great job for getting your foot in the door.
Quote:
This is a replacement role, and the level of responsibility will undoubtedly increase within a year
That's what'd get me excited right there. Go in as a recent graduate, work your year to learn the business (or learn what having a job is like for some people) and after that year move up to the full responsibilities (and likely pay).
cool_dude 16th November 2011, 20:23 Quote
£18k for a placement year = yes.

£18k for a graduate = no

Although i suppose it depends what type of degree you've done, if it was an easy 4 hour a week 1 assignment per semester then snap it up thats all you're worth.

On the other hand, if it was an intense degree (astrophysics, engineering, mathematics etc) then no way.

my opinion of course.
Ljs 16th November 2011, 20:31 Quote
A lot of you seem worryingly out of touch with the real world...
RedFlames 16th November 2011, 20:47 Quote
would love to do something like that [hell any job atm] but no driving license + it being down south rules me out...

wages wise... i'm a graduate, i'd take 18k a year... whether i could live on it without tax credits and whatnot is another matter...

can't even get a minimum wage phone-drone type job atm

and to all those saying 'there's jobs, you're just not trying/have too high standards'... quietly bugger off... not been sat on the dole for the past year because i enjoy it...
Petrol head 16th November 2011, 20:50 Quote
I would love an opportunity to work for Asus. Once in, other options become available. Shame I earn over £24k on a call centre as a mechanical engineer. Some times a few letters after your name helps (CAE AMIMI).
erratum1 16th November 2011, 20:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrie
So after much learning, experience and years that warrants you £45k a year. Isn't this ASUS job an opportunity for someone, graduate or otherwise, just that too? An opportunity to learn and gain experience and in time to potentially elevate themselves to your lofty salary level?

Very true this position gets your foot in the door, and then.....with Asus on your CV who knows !!
Canon 16th November 2011, 20:56 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedFlames


and to all those saying 'there's jobs, you're just not trying/have too high standards'... quietly bugger off... not been sat on the dole for the past year because i enjoy it...

It's enraging huh? I once had to stick up for a poor bloke, his friend told him he was just being lazy and needed to go and get onto a course or some sort of further education to better his chances of employment.

What most people, those sorts that don't live in the real world don't realize is that when you are claiming those benefits these days you ARE NOT ALLOWED to do ANYTHING that would prevent you from looking for work, and they decide how that is defined.

For example, you have little or no qualifications, no experience, nobody will hire you, you have a course you think would give you a step into an area with plenty of jobs available, unless it is a course they have recommended (WHICH THEY ONLY CATER UP TO A VRQ NOW!) then you cannot do it for more than a certain number of hours a week.

From my short experience, a lot of stories and many friends who have worked the other side of the desk, they push you into a corner and can often make it more difficult to find work.
cgthomas 16th November 2011, 22:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrew8200m
Wages in IT industry are not ideal at the moment as the UK customer base wants cheap cheap cheap driving down profits, and ultimately down the line wages for those in the industry.

I beg to differ, this kind of salary is only suitable for a junior (graduate). The job spec seems to be looking for someone more experienced.
-VK- 16th November 2011, 22:09 Quote
A foot in the door to an exciting industry, with one of the top companies within that industry and the opportunity to learn from some of the best in the field. ASUS are a great company to work for and I wish applicants luck :)
Kovoet 16th November 2011, 22:31 Quote
Damn if I was good at putting things down on paper I would jump at it.
law99 16th November 2011, 22:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgthomas
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrew8200m
Wages in IT industry are not ideal at the moment as the UK customer base wants cheap cheap cheap driving down profits, and ultimately down the line wages for those in the industry.

I beg to differ, this kind of salary is only suitable for a junior (graduate). The job spec seems to be looking for someone more experienced.

I beg to differ also, but with you. I just took on similar responsibilities for a little less with no degree. If someone with a degree got it, then yes, they could earn a little more if they have any aptitude in the areas they are looking, but the degree is worth **** if you don't.

I got my job through temping. I beat people with degrees because I am cheaper probably, but that just shows you how worthless they can be. I guess they thought I could do the job.

My brother is an IT manager and a Marketing Manager with a degree and is only on the cusp of earning the 30k.

He's doing two jobs there. Two. What should he be on with a degree also?

I'm not knocking a degree as I wish I had pursued higher education, rather than music and alcoholism, but it isn't the end of the world.
Anfield 16th November 2011, 23:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by cool_dude
£18k for a graduate = no

Due to the Education System being ****ed beyond believe in the UK going to University is really not much more than catching up what you should have learned in School.
And because almost everyone going to University is keeping a lot of young People away from Unemployment Statistics the Government has zero Interest in fixing Schools.
As a result there are People who have been to University flipping Burgers in Mc Donalds, what gets you a better job is working experience, luck and knowing the right People.
K404 16th November 2011, 23:27 Quote
3 pages of off-topic and bitching.

Dunno if anyones noticed but unemployment is at a 17-year high and inflation is at 5% along with a very uncertain Eurozone.

Now a job opportunity comes along and very few people seem to appreciate that a company is A/ taking on staff in this climate and B/ doing it in the UK when i'm very sure there are MILLIONS of English-speaking people worldwide who would do it for half the money.

Given the unemployment numbers and restrictions on company spending, it's an EMPLOYERS market.... they can be as tight on wages and as fussy about staff as they want.

Might send this link to a few newspapers. "UK population content. £18K starting salary considered too low. More details on page 5"

I don't think this job will fit with my education or interests, but i'm happy that a company is advertising..... and good luck to all those who submit applications :)
andrew8200m 17th November 2011, 00:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by K404
3 pages of off-topic and bitching.

Dunno if anyones noticed but unemployment is at a 17-year high and inflation is at 5% along with a very uncertain Eurozone.

Now a job opportunity comes along and very few people seem to appreciate that a company is A/ taking on staff in this climate and B/ doing it in the UK when i'm very sure there are MILLIONS of English-speaking people worldwide who would do it for half the money.

Given the unemployment numbers and restrictions on company spending, it's an EMPLOYERS market.... they can be as tight on wages and as fussy about staff as they want.

Might send this link to a few newspapers. "UK population content. £18K starting salary considered too low. More details on page 5"

I don't think this job will fit with my education or interests, but i'm happy that a company is advertising..... and good luck to all those who submit applications :)


I couldnt agree more! As a job goes it has prospects, it has worth! £18-22K isnt too bad, Its more than enough if you have a partner on even a minimum wage. I dont see what the issue is that people have here. Clearly most do not value the worth of a job in todays unpredictable climate.
Infiniti 17th November 2011, 00:48 Quote
damn... honestly i would love something like this.! ive trained since i was 16 as a pastry chef/baker and now at 28 cant afford to drive or own my own establishment! i do anywhere between 40-60 hours a week and only get 14k a year... it annoys me when "graduates" moan they dont get a good starting wage.. in this economic climate anything is better than nothing..
ya93sin 17th November 2011, 02:57 Quote
With any job, you'd also be looking at the opportunities to move up the hierarchy/payscale. Suddenly the job becomes very tempting if say within 12 months you could get a promotion, and with that a higher wage. As a starting salary it's not actually that bad. And as has been said, a job is a job, in the current climate getting a job is not the easiest thing, especially a decently paid one, or one in a field which really interests you.
damien c 17th November 2011, 07:31 Quote
Wow if the wages were better I would have applied for that but I am not leaving my job and taking a wage cut to work for one of the best, component companies around and it would be a large pay cut!

I think for someone who has just left College or University then it will be fine but not for me.

Now if this had come around in the 18 month's that it took me to get my current job, then yeah I would have gone for it considering I was looking anywhere and everywhere for work even cleaning street's, because at the end of the day I needed a job at that time, something's got to pay for my endless computer upgrades :)
adidan 17th November 2011, 07:53 Quote
A job isn't just about wages, it's about the job, its prospects the employer and countless other variables.

As a graduate myself, all us graduates entered the degree system knowing the state of the jobs market and the financial burden of that degree. If you entered it expecting to walk straight into one of a plethora of jobs with a salary of £40k+ then, quite frankly, you're (generally) not bright enough to really have been allowed to go on a degree in the first place.

It's a great starting opportunity with a great company,
Anneon 17th November 2011, 10:31 Quote
Asus must be pretty confident about the salary quoted as it is a buyers marked at the moment when it comes to labour.

After all if you pay peanuts you will get monkeys.
yodasarmpit 17th November 2011, 10:47 Quote
I'm starting to understand now, why unemployment in the 16 to 24 sector is so high.

To expect a starting salary much more than stated in the ad, for Grad, is a bit unrealistic. A degree means nothing in business other than demonstrating that you have the aptitude to learn and put into practice your abilities.

I've seen enough grads, with excellent academic abilities, who have absolutely no clue when it comes to the business, meeting deadlines, dealing with stakeholders, and delivering projects to a decent standard.

It's a starting position, where you will be provided with a salary and the chance to develop further. Only then will opportunities open up, hopefully within the company that has invested so much in your development, where a more palatable salary awaits.
Tibby 17th November 2011, 10:54 Quote
Eugh, but Hemel Hempstead.
Not a nice place!
Spreadie 17th November 2011, 11:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by adidan
If you entered it expecting to walk straight into one of a plethora of jobs with a salary of £40k+ then, quite frankly, you're (generally) not bright enough to really have been allowed to go on a degree in the first place.
+1

The idea that, because you've spent an extra 3 or 4 years in education, you're somehow entitled to walk into a fantastic salary (without proving your worth to an employer), is ludicrous.

I think the general view that 18-22k isn't a good salary, is because so many people are financially better off than that on benefits in the UK.

An opportunity to work for a top-flight tech company, with a very good (IMO) starting salary, should have people reaching for their CVs.
raxonb 17th November 2011, 11:44 Quote
Im still looking for my first IT job and in general don't apply for anything paying more than 16-18k because my application just won't be taken seriously as I have no experience, although I have a couple MCPs and am studying for more. And I have a 1st Class degree in Computer Systems Engineering and frankly no company has ever given a f**k about that either. I've been applying for IT jobs for 3 years now and everytime I get to the interview stage I'm told "You was great. You have this/that *praise praise praise* - but another candidate had some experience so unfortunately you didn't get the position". I can't get experience if no-one gives me that opportunity! I'll apply to this position and report back on how quickly I got rejected.
Carrie 17th November 2011, 12:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yodasarmpit
I'm starting to understand now, why unemployment in the 16 to 24 sector is so high.

To expect a starting salary much more than stated in the ad, for Grad, is a bit unrealistic. A degree means nothing in business other than demonstrating that you have the aptitude to learn and put into practice your abilities.

I've seen enough grads, with excellent academic abilities, who have absolutely no clue when it comes to the business, meeting deadlines, dealing with stakeholders, and delivering projects to a decent standard.

It's a starting position, where you will be provided with a salary and the chance to develop further. Only then will opportunities open up, hopefully within the company that has invested so much in your development, where a more palatable salary awaits.

I agree in principle with the exception of what the attainment of a degree can mean. I know people with degrees that had excellent retentive memories but no practical application abilities whatsoever.

The salary range being offered is £18k to £22k and frankly a newly qualified graduate is unlikely to have sufficient skills to walk into the job and have it down pat immediately. There is a learning curve to go through, particularly for those without experience, so why should employers pay a salary to match your ultimate potential when they're unable to benefit from it immediately?

As Yoda says, the job spec also states: This is a replacement role, and the level of responsibility will undoubtedly increase within a year. so undoubtedly with increased levels of responsibility will come increased commensuration or failing that a fuller experience to take to the next job opportunity that will pay more.

Bit-Tech have been good enough to advertise this position to all in the forum to give someone a possible opportunity to work, or work in a field they want to. Frankly I think those of you bitching about the rate and/or location are an ungrateful bunch of *****
Panos 17th November 2011, 12:28 Quote
Guys the role is sound. But even at 22K, you have to own your house in the area, or live with parents etc.
Herts isn't one of the cheapest areas to rent you know.
Carrie 17th November 2011, 12:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panos
Guys the role is sound. But even at 22K, you have to own your house in the area, or live with parents etc.
Herts isn't one of the cheapest areas to rent you know.

But it's a first or early opportunity, that's the point, and at say £20k pa, or £1,666 pm gross, it's a damn site better than job seekers allowance! So tell me, even at £75-90 pw rent is the opportunity worth the short term "hardship"?

For example only:
http://forums.bit-tech.net/picture.php?albumid=1420&pictureid=23675


Remember "I want" does not automatically mean "I get" before you've earned the right to it
Lizard 17th November 2011, 12:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panos
Guys the role is sound. But even at 22K, you have to own your house in the area, or live with parents etc.
Herts isn't one of the cheapest areas to rent you know.

There are hundreds of thousands of people earning a lot less than 18K living in around London and Hertordshire you know?
Ljs 17th November 2011, 13:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panos
Guys the role is sound. But even at 22K, you have to own your house in the area, or live with parents etc.
Herts isn't one of the cheapest areas to rent you know.

House share? Studio? The job is for a graduate, not a rockstar...

I can't believe there is so much fuss in this discussion and not for the right reasons.
adidan 17th November 2011, 17:14 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by true_gamer
Seems to me that allot of people know how to play the system, and live off US, the TAX payers.
I never understand how the system can be played, from my experience in a couple of instances where I needed benefit I found it almost impossible to get anything.

Thankfully I don't have to worry about that at the moment.

When my brother got made redundant he went into the Job Centre to try and find work and the staff were only concerned with him filling in forms to claim benefit. Thankfully that situation didn't last long either.

I think the 'playing the system' cases have been overplayed in the media, there are far more people, including people with terminal cancer, who have been turned down for incapacity benefit. They number just as many, if not more, than the ones who 'play the system'.

Anyway, that's another issue.

Back to topic. I can't believe that a good opportunity with a good employer is being slated so badly for it's wage, many people earn less than that after working for years in a job.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panos
Guys the role is sound. But even at 22K, you have to own your house in the area, or live with parents etc.
Herts isn't one of the cheapest areas to rent you know.
How can I put this, you live in a world of make believe my friend.

This is a starting opportunity, not sure why people are so narrow and short sighted not to see the prospects. I'd rather take an 18k job with Asus over a 25k job with McDonalds any day.
GuilleAcoustic 17th November 2011, 17:24 Quote
I'm earn over40K at the moment, but 5 years ago I started at 12K.

What you earn at the begining is not the most important. Opportunity can make you rise quicker.

Asus is a big company that can offer many opportunities (more money, more responsabilty, team management, working in a foreign country, etc.) and it is a great addition to a cv.

Thanks Asus for this offer.
LennyRhys 17th November 2011, 18:46 Quote
Quote:
This is a starting opportunity, not sure why people are so narrow and short sighted not to see the prospects. I'd rather take an 18k job with Asus over a 25k job with McDonalds any day.

+1

People are too money-centric when it comes to vacancies, especially given the current economic climate. A job is a future - everybody starts somewhere, be it in university or as a trainee/apprentice. Better to earn a little now than spend forever looking for the "right salary."
runadumb 17th November 2011, 19:57 Quote
This thread is making me feel rotten haha. I've been in the same job for 7 years and with only a few weeks to go until I hit 30 I have went from 25-27k five or so years ago to 21-22k. This is happening because of losing shift work and my company forever dumbing down my work (electrical engineer) to the point were I could train anyone to do my daily job in a few weeks. The only difficulty would be when something doesn't work as it should and the untrained just shrug their shoulders. My "skills" are rottening into nothing in the meantime.
I know jobs generally pay less here in N.Ireland than England but still, this seems decent, especially for a starting role. A foot on the ladder.

I now have more bills than ever and earning less doing a dumbed down version of the job from my early mid-twenties. Still, its a job and it pays for my entertainment/life.
Fizzban 17th November 2011, 20:23 Quote
Shame my written talents are..wanting..hahaha. I could do most of it happily..opps no drivers licence. poo
law99 17th November 2011, 23:56 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anneon
Asus must be pretty confident about the salary quoted as it is a buyers marked at the moment when it comes to labour.

After all if you pay peanuts you will get monkeys.

The problem with that analogy is it implies the people doing the employing are the real idiots. You don't hire someone who can't do the work. It's as simple as that.
TI99/4A 18th November 2011, 05:15 Quote
A lot of the comments so far have concentrated on the salary alone. Yes, the bills have to be paid. But for me, it is more important for a job to be enjoyable and interesting, as well as being worthwhile.

There is little worse than dragging yourself out of bed if you despise the work, no matter what the pay. It will slowly grind you down.
Blarte 18th November 2011, 08:14 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by true_gamer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrie
So after much learning, experience and years that warrants you £45k a year. Isn't this ASUS an opportunity for someone, graduate or otherwise, just that too? An opportunity to learn and gain experience?


Yep, I totally agree, no different to my partner, who started from the bottom, and is now the Head veterinary Nurse/Practice Manager of a Vets earning more than me...

Of which I have probably paid 50% of the wages this year :(
julianmartin 18th November 2011, 10:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petrol head
I would love an opportunity to work for Asus. Once in, other options become available. Shame I earn over £24k on a call centre as a mechanical engineer. Some times a few letters after your name helps (CAE AMIMI).

Say what? Are you actually an engineer? I presume AMIMI is the motor industry one, but how can you be an engineer in a call centre? No offence intended but I'm struggling to work that one out.
faugusztin 18th November 2011, 10:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by julianmartin
No offence intended but I'm struggling to work that one out.

Maybe he is doing phone support ? Like the guys at internet providers, who are responding to the more technical questions/problem reports once you get through the first line of defense, aka the FAQ call center*.

*FAQ call center = the people who pick up the phone when you call the hotline, and the ones who try the solutions according to the question list - aka "did you reboot the computer? did you reboot the router ? did you reboot the modem ? can you try again ? ok, it is not working, i am switching you to our technician" people :D
Baz 18th November 2011, 10:51 Quote
Some of you seem worryingly out of touch with the graduate and jobs market. 18-22k for a graduate position is a pretty reasonable starting wage, and with a house share is easily a liveable wage out in Hemel, which isn't as expensive as inner London. As hard as it might be to realise, not everyone is on 40k+ as a systems engineer.

Best of luck to whoever applies; great opportunity to start in the technical PR industry.
sandys 18th November 2011, 10:57 Quote
Blimey, sounds ideal to get started, my starting salary was about 8.8k, adjusted for inflation to now that's about 15k, got in the door somewhere, had huge increases since, you've gotta start somewhere and be realistic with it, with some tangible experience behind you in a good company to prove your worth your earnings potential will be a lot higher, first few years my salary went up exponentially as did my opportunities for employment.
Anneon 18th November 2011, 10:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by law99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anneon
Asus must be pretty confident about the salary quoted as it is a buyers marked at the moment when it comes to labour.

After all if you pay peanuts you will get monkeys.

The problem with that analogy is it implies the people doing the employing are the real idiots. You don't hire someone who can't do the work. It's as simple as that.

But you have to attract the right people in the first place.
Carrie 18th November 2011, 11:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anneon
But you have to attract the right people in the first place.

But you don't have to over-pay them in an employers' market
jon88888888 18th November 2011, 13:27 Quote
18-22k in the current climate at a reputable company like Asus?
Ladies and gentlemen, I have been working in the tech industry for over 10 years at a big ish player in the market , trust me on this when I tell you to snap this opportunity up asap. They will be looking for people with the right attitude.
I have had to interview all kinds of job applicants, mainly over qualified(mba's phd's everysingle microsoft qualification under the sun) and pass their mid 20s, the reason they havent found a real job yet is because they feel entitled to a 50k a year job due to the first class honours degrees. Its a sad situation to see such people working in bars till their 30s and then give up altogether. Snap up this job asap! The right attitude takes you a lot further in life than qualifications!
Farfalho 18th November 2011, 14:41 Quote
For everyone saying alot - here's to you http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/04/alot-is-better-than-you-at-everything.html.

Having a job opportunity is better than none with a monthly wage guaranteed, try working at real estate, then you will be bitching about not getting paid properly because I have.
Spoiled brats bitching for rights and don't giving a rat's ass about duties
Kovoet 18th November 2011, 14:45 Quote
I think its worth a go realising especially in retail employers are now taking more part timers than anything else as there are so many people out of work they jump at anything.

Speaking to a bus driver the other day they are also now employing part timers rather than full timers.

remember you can use this as a stepping stone to something bigger.
-VK- 18th November 2011, 15:33 Quote
So to chime in on this, the job being advertised is very similar to the job I started my career within the industry and is actually at a higher salary than I started on. Whilst I can't comment on this role in particular, or how ASUS are to work for now (I left ~10 months ago), during my time they were a supportive company, looking to nurture and grow people into a good position within the IT industry.

I happen to live in Hemel Hempstead and checking the paper yesterday, you can find a flat to rent excluding bills in a "niceish" area for around ~£650 a month - As somebody earlier posted, you can find rooms to rent for cheaper than this.

If anyone is genuinely interested and wants to ask questions please drop me a PM - happy to answer anything I can :)
Yadda 19th November 2011, 23:43 Quote
I can't believe some people are turning their nose up at this and expect to walk into a better paying job straight from university! Sure, it *can* happen but realistically, would you turn down every girl in the hope that one day Miss World asks you out? Get real!

This a great opportunity for the right person.
PabloFunky 20th November 2011, 07:51 Quote
Exactly its not a bad wage atal (mine sucks compared).

Just having a job in these times is good enough for me.

I think the older people are much more aware of the situation of the job scene ive had many jobs over the years and after finishing one had no problems walking into another.

However the last job i was redundant for 9 months or so and was thinking i had no chance.

So even being qualified and a large amount of on job experience hard working reliable never sick always on time.

These things were always enough to get me a job but now, i have to convince the employers im more suitable than the other 500 applicants before me.

Its not a good idea to asume that just because you learnt lots at school, your entitled to the job.

It seems some of these posts are assuming that theyve been given the job already and if they wanted it they could have it.

Reality check. An employer only needs to pay the minimum wage £6.08 an hour, and hes within the law, i can assure you there will be someone in this country that will be glad to take the job even for that.

Good luck to anyone that applies from here though.
metalgearhathaway 20th November 2011, 21:24 Quote
You'd want to know what the scope of pay is after the initial year where they say the role will be much more developed.

18-22 not bad for the foot in, but after that you'd want much closer or exceeding 30k if you we're considered good enough for the increased expectations they are hinting at.

The comments about minimum pay, really only apply to those jobs that require no real skill other than being willing to work in the first place. Comparing what Asus will want of the person to someone operating a barcode cash register is pointless and therefore pay is of concern.
cool_dude 20th November 2011, 22:11 Quote
At the end of the day my opinion is its not whats coming in, its whats going out (£ wise of course).

And £18k doesn't go very far, especially if you're in London by the time rent is paid and travel how much are you actually working for to actually spend on items to reward yourself for working? Its just working to live... almost.

I agree with the comments re; degree - some people do expect to launch at £40k starting and I agree whilst that'd be nice its stupid to think that.

So £18k isn't bad starting in that case, as long as its starting and theres room to progress up so on seond thought its not too bad if you're having to 'work to live' for the first few years. I suppose my comment geared toward the being "stuck on 18k for a good few years".

Imo its important for graduates to not jump at any salary, as companies will just drive the salary down further taking the p***.

Then again, its not if you have a degree - its what degree you have. There really is a lot of pointless ones out there.

Opinions ofc, forums are for discussion. :D.
LennyRhys 20th November 2011, 23:29 Quote
It does depend what degree you have and what job you qualify for, and the responsibility that goes with said job. My sister is a qualified GP with several years' experience and when she graduated after studying medicine for 5 years, her starting salary was about 40K... then again, she did work about 90 hours a week in one of the UK's biggest hospitals (gotta love the NHS).

Some jobs pay extremely well from the start, and some don't - that's just the way the cookie crumbles.

I agree with those who think 18K is low for a graduate salary - it's possible to get 16K working in a sports shop for 45 hours a week; but the graduate job is skilled and there are prospects... after selling sports goods for ten years, you'll probably still be on 16K and your CV won't look particularly flash.
Margon 23rd November 2011, 09:33 Quote
I think 18k is a pretty sweet salary for just leaving uni. I was actually earning more on a few contracts i picked up while I was at uni, than when I got a graduate placement when I left. I think when I left i got a job with a salary that was 14.1k. Last year when i moved back to brighton I breifly took a job which was 12k a year, thankfully that was only for 3 months, but I stupidly moved here without sorting out work so needed whatever I could get. If I lived in Hemel, or london rather than brighton, I would probably consider giving up my 25k salary for the better prospects this job could offer.
raxonb 24th November 2011, 12:38 Quote
Got my reply back today and.....

The position has already been filled!!
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