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Intel signs research pact with Tyndall

Intel signs research pact with Tyndall

Intel's agreement with the Tyndall National Institute gives it access to junctionless transistor technology.

*** UPDATE 1.10.2010 ***

The Tyndall National Institute has got in touch with bit-tech to correct a rather serious misunderstanding that arose when we reported the $1.5 million deal between the Insitute and Intel, during which we claimed that it offered Intel exclusive exploitation rights to Tyndall's innovative junctionless transistor technology.

The full version of the updated story can be found here.

*** END UPDATE ***


Intel has signed a deal with the Tyndall National Institute at the University of Cork that will help the company implement junctionless transistors in its chips.

The junctionless transistor tech, which was developed at Tyndall University by a team of researchers led by Professor Jean-Pierre Colinge, could be implemented by Intel once it reaches the 20nm manufacturing process. It will provide the company with a significant technical advantage over its rivals and simplify the production of small-process, high-speed processors.

The agreement will also see the pair working on next-generation materials for use in processor manufacturing, new and innovative discrete devices, and Intel's favourite topic of the day, photonics - with Tyndall's researchers helping to develop on-chip optical interconnects; Intel believes this is the key to unlocking the power of future high-speed chips once electrical interconnects start to become tricky at smaller process sizes.

Intel's director of components research, Mike Mayberry, sees the deal, which gives Intel exclusive rights to the commercial exploitation of Tyndall's research in exchange for a $1.5 million investment over a three-year period, told press that "we at Intel are excited to enter into this advanced research agreement with Tyndall and look forward to a productive collaboration with the team here."

Tyndall's chief executive officer, Professor Whatmore, said that he believes "this collaborative research program with Intel provides direct industry and market guidance to our research programs, helping to ensure that what we deliver is manufacturable, relevant and of benefit to society", while enabling the university to "advance our technologies to the marketplace much more rapidly than we could possibly do on our own."

It isn't the first time that Intel and Tyndall have worked together, but the new deal marks the biggest agreement so far. It's also only the second such agreement that has taken place between Intel and an independent research house in Europe, the first being with the IMEC Research Institute in Belgium.

Is Intel's agreement a good thing for the industry, or would you have liked to see one of the smaller players get this deal to boost their R&D? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

16 Comments

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mi1ez 23rd September 2010, 11:14 Quote
could be interesting. hope the university does well out of the deal rather than being held back by the exclusivity.
mclean007 23rd September 2010, 11:18 Quote
$1.5m isn't even a rounding error on Intel's chicken feed bill - for exclusivity on something as potentially revolutionary as this it sounds like they have bagged the bargain of the century!
tad2008 23rd September 2010, 11:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mclean007
$1.5m isn't even a rounding error on Intel's chicken feed bill - for exclusivity on something as potentially revolutionary as this it sounds like they have bagged the bargain of the century!

+1
McSteel 23rd September 2010, 11:53 Quote
"TECHNOLOGY STOLEN." (with a heavy Russian accent), said the harsh but very feminine voice in my head, when I saw the "$1.5 million" figure. *******s.
Jezcentral 23rd September 2010, 11:59 Quote
True, but as this is only a 3 year deal, expect the price of extending it to go up massively. The timing is good too, with the 3 years taking us up to the 20nm process.
javaman 23rd September 2010, 13:28 Quote
Research like this needs funded but I do worry about other companies and if this will tighten intels strangle over the market in the future. Maybe by then we'll have moved to GPU computing and not need manufacturing shrinks so much but architecture will be key.
BRAWL 23rd September 2010, 13:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by McSteel
"TECHNOLOGY STOLEN." (with a heavy Russian accent), said the harsh but very feminine voice in my head, when I saw the "$1.5 million" figure. *******s.

Haha priceless....

Jeez, they're gonna get ripped to bits for that. Intel could make that money back ten-fold (plus some you think?) within two years if this goes their way!
kempez 23rd September 2010, 14:35 Quote
Intel's CEO meets with Tyndall:

Intel Mike Mayberry: "We'd love to work with you on this"
Tyndall's Professor Whatmore: "Sure thing, but we need funding or..."
Intel Mike Mayberry: "'Ang on a sec, I've got some change in my pocket. Yeah here we go. $1.5m OK?"
Tyndall's Professor Whatmore: "Oh yes of course, if you don't think that's too much"
Intel Mike Mayberry: *looking shiftily at the prof* "Um...sure...too....much...umm....no that's fine"
Intel Mike Mayberry (aside to a lawyer): "Get him to sign the damn contract quick before he looks up our R&D budget and remembers which universe he's in"
SaNdCrAwLeR 23rd September 2010, 15:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by kempez
Intel's CEO meets with Tyndall:

Intel Mike Mayberry: "We'd love to work with you on this"
Tyndall's Professor Whatmore: "Sure thing, but we need funding or..."
Intel Mike Mayberry: "'Ang on a sec, I've got some change in my pocket. Yeah here we go. $1.5m OK?"
Tyndall's Professor Whatmore: "Oh yes of course, if you don't think that's too much"
Intel Mike Mayberry: *looking shiftily at the prof* "Um...sure...too....much...umm....no that's fine"
Intel Mike Mayberry (aside to a lawyer): "Get him to sign the damn contract quick before he looks up our R&D budget and remembers which universe he's in"

I'm betting this is totally what happened! haha! :D
but seriously... $1.5m would be very welcome at my uni too :P
Turbotab 23rd September 2010, 17:45 Quote
I bet they sealed the deal with some of their wonderful paper CPU upgrades.
aron311 23rd September 2010, 19:21 Quote
Absolute MUGS, why not hand everything over in return for Intel paying a royalty for each CPU that uses this tech?

$1.5m is like pissing in the Atlantic! This is INTEL!
Oggyb 23rd September 2010, 19:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by aron311
Absolute MUGS, why not hand everything over in return for Intel paying a royalty for each CPU that uses this tech?

$1.5m is like pissing in the Atlantic! This is INTEL!

Yes, a royalty-generating licence on the technology would net the university a considerable ongoing income, much more useful for research.
frontline 23rd September 2010, 20:09 Quote
It might give " exclusive rights to the commercial exploitation of Tyndall's research ", however is there anything to stop one or more of Tyndall's research team taking their intellectual property/research experience elsewhere, before the research is complete?
JaredC01 23rd September 2010, 21:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by frontline
It might give " exclusive rights to the commercial exploitation of Tyndall's research ", however is there anything to stop one or more of Tyndall's research team taking their intellectual property/research experience elsewhere, before the research is complete?

Once again, this is Intel... Their lawyers get paid more to make sure things like that don't happen than they gave to Tyndall!
StephenK 24th September 2010, 01:11 Quote
I'll be down that way next week (at a phd defence) shall I bring a copy of the comments with me? Would be good for the lols :)
CAPSLOCK 24th September 2010, 08:45 Quote
I read the title as "Intel signs research pact with Tyrell" for some reason.

Replicant mentats? Might be able to run Crysis.
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