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Galileo sat-nav contest gets underway

Galileo sat-nav contest gets underway

The Galileo satellite network offers GPS-like capabilities - and this contest promises £10,000 for novel uses thereof.

An industry group is attempting to drum up interest in the European Galileo satellite positioning system with a contest featuring £435,000 in prizes.

As reported over on V3.co.uk, the 2010 European Satellite Navigation Competition looks to kick-start commercial exploitation of the Galileo system and has a large prize pot to get businesses interested.

For UK businesses, a winning idea will see them net £10,000 plus aid in developing their proposal into a European patent - allowing them a head-start in exploiting the new satellite position system across the European Community. Winners from each country participating in the contest will also be entered for the Galileo Masters Prize, which promises an additional £17,000 to the business with the best idea.

The Galileo system was designed as a complementary global positioning satellite network to be used in addition to the current GPS network developed and maintained by the United States - but, importantly, to be out of the control of the US. By implementing a European-controlled series of satellites, not only can the overall accuracy and reliability of satellite navigation systems be improved, but in the event that the US - for whatever reason - shuts the GPS network down, the Galileo system will continue to operate.

Although the contest is mainly open to businesses with a commercially viable idea, there's nothing to stop individuals with a bright notion as to how the Galileo system can be best put to use from entering too: if you're interested in a stab at the prize money, details are available over on the official website.

Do you think that the Galileo system is important for Europe, or should we be saving the money and just using the US GPS system instead? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

7 Comments

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Leitchy 26th April 2010, 12:59 Quote
GPS Implant to track our dearly beloveds that uses the Galileo system. £10,000 please!
Xir 26th April 2010, 15:21 Quote
It's a GPS-Clone...and they're looking for a patentable application that hasn't been thought of before. GOOD LUCK!
yanglu 26th April 2010, 15:38 Quote
Galileo should be more accurate than GPS. I think they're designing it to work alongside GPS and the Russian GLONASS satellites. Hopefully that should mean better GPS reception across the world.
Farfalho 27th April 2010, 20:49 Quote
I'm up with the Gareth. The fact that Galileo is an European space product will mean more accuracy in the data received from the GPS units and to not be dependent on US
Sloth 27th April 2010, 23:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yanglu
Galileo should be more accurate than GPS. I think they're designing it to work alongside GPS and the Russian GLONASS satellites. Hopefully that should mean better GPS reception across the world.
Indeed it should, and should really benefit everyone in the end. Understandable to maintain independence from the US GPS system, though it would be nice to see an international effort under one system. Soon we'll be seeing GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, COMPASS, and all the smaller regional ones all operated by separate countries. Granted, they all work together and there's plenty of regulation, it just seems odd that a global navigation system is being left in the hands of individual parties.
Combatus 28th April 2010, 11:36 Quote
The extra redundancy is very welcome, especially for mission critical applications. Even though the US removed selective availability years ago, there was still a need for Differential GPS for accuracy and fail safe reasons and being able to use signals from two or more systems can only be a good thing, not just for accuracy but for reliability and dependability too. The first hardware to be able to receive signals from both GPS and Galileo will sell like hot cakes.
Farfalho 29th April 2010, 13:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Combatus
The extra redundancy is very welcome, especially for mission critical applications. Even though the US removed selective availability years ago, there was still a need for Differential GPS for accuracy and fail safe reasons and being able to use signals from two or more systems can only be a good thing, not just for accuracy but for reliability and dependability too. The first hardware to be able to receive signals from both GPS and Galileo will sell like hot cakes.

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