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Google netbooks set to hit market

Google netbooks set to hit market

Google's Android and Chrome operating systems are set to hit the netbook market, but which one will emerge the victor?

Google's popular portable operating systems are set to make the leap into larger devices this year - although manufacturers are still torn as to whether Chrome or Android is the way to go.

Sitting on the Chrome OS side of the fence is Samsung, which according to Australian site Channel News has recently confirmed a netbook running Google's browser-based cloud operating system.

With a 10.1 inch LED-backlit display and around 12 hours of battery life, the N210-styled netbook, which is as yet unnamed by the company, will have a surprisingly impressive 2GB of RAM and at least 64GB of on-board storage - a huge amount of horsepower for a lightweight operating system designed to store all of its documents on Google's cloud servers.

So far the processor built in to the system isn't known, but it's thought that Samsung might be going down the ARM route to get the impressive 12 hour battery life - with rumours circulating it could even be Qualcomm's latest 1.5GHz Snapdragon chip under the hood. Sadly, we'll have to wait to find out: there's no official launch date as yet.

While Samsung might be concentrating on the netbook-oriented Chrome, other manufacturers continue to attempt to shoe-horn Google's Android - originally developed as a smartphone platform - onto ever larger devices, with the latest design coming from Hewlett Packard. According to V3.co.uk, the Compaq AirLife 100 will have a similar 10.1" screen, a Snapdragon processor, but a mere 16GB of solid-state storage on-board. Unlike the Samsung device, the AirLife 100 comes with on-board GPS.

With a 12-hour battery life to rival the Chrome OS-based device from Samsung, it'll be interesting to see which of the two devices succeeds in the market - or even if consumers can be convinced to give up Windows on their netbook.

Which do you think is the most suited to netbook use - Android or Chrome? Would you personally prefer a more desktop-oriented Linux distribution such as Ubuntu? Perhaps you're of the opinion that it's Windows or nothing? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

20 Comments

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shanky887614 15th February 2010, 11:48 Quote
andriod all the way becasue isnt google chrome just a glorified internete browser?
barndoor101 15th February 2010, 11:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanky887614
andriod all the way becasue isnt google chrome just a glorified internete browser?

you could argue that android is just a glorified smartphone OS
Dave Lister 15th February 2010, 12:04 Quote
I'd go with android, don't like the idea of cloud computing at all.
crazyceo 15th February 2010, 12:11 Quote
The real problem they will face is the consumer. They only want to buy Windows. This isn't aimed at starting a flame war.

Every netbook sold with a linux distro has not gone on to success. As soon as they release the same model but with a Windows OS it sells a hell of alot more.
NuTech 15th February 2010, 12:20 Quote
Google taking ChromeOS and Android to market is really odd, it's like they've now backed themselves into a corner. I'd prefer to see ChromeOS acting as an optional UI for Android-based netbooks.

The smart thing Apple has done is keep the visual appearance of iPhoneOS with the updated iPad version. Non-techsavvy users love this because it's not another device they have to learn to use.

Back on topic, regarding the CPU, I never knew that it could make such a big difference to battery life. I always thought the LCD screen was the biggest limiting factor.
l3v1ck 15th February 2010, 12:26 Quote
It's true, people like me want Windows on our laptops (or netbooks in this case). Not as much as on desktops, as there aren't the same driver issues, but there are a lot of games etc that will only work on Windows.
ac4155 15th February 2010, 13:21 Quote
seems like google have shot them selves in the foot with is.

This could, and more than likely will, split the sales of each OS and if they come to merge them like they said they more than likely would at some point, surly that would just create customer confusion for the people who are non-techsavvy users.
[PUNK] crompers 15th February 2010, 13:25 Quote
does android not require a touchscreen to work properly? if the interface is not made for mouse and keyboard could be disasterous
eddtox 15th February 2010, 13:25 Quote
If it doesn't run a "full-fat" OS I'm not interested. Windows or Linux for my computers, thank you very much.
UncertainGod 15th February 2010, 13:28 Quote
Android & ChromeOS will merge soon enough, I see ChromeOS becoming more of an app package for net connected Android machines.
HourBeforeDawn 15th February 2010, 18:19 Quote
Android is most likely be the successor between the two, at least until Cloud really takes off then Chrome may have the advantage since thats what its aiming towards
Fruitloaf 15th February 2010, 19:42 Quote
Super thin and light laptop with long battery life that will hopefully have a swivel touch screen running Android so it has plenty of apps. Yes please just sell me it for £300 not full fat laptop prices.
Shagbag 15th February 2010, 20:05 Quote
More choice = good for the consumer.
Open standards = good for the consumer.
javaman 15th February 2010, 20:16 Quote
the line between smart phones and laptops blurs further
crazyceo 15th February 2010, 23:13 Quote
Is this going to end up like one of those Crapple iTampax things?
B3CK 16th February 2010, 16:58 Quote
I've tried Chrome OS on my laptop, Dell 1720. And I for one would love to dual boot it along side windows. 12sec boot time from a thumb drive, and on the internet after login in less time than getting to the login screen Vs. Windows. That's just beautiful. I do prefer Chrome as my browser when I'm inside windows as a side note against Firefox.
I would not be able to just drop Windows however, or Ubuntu that I'm currently dual booting with. But to enable Chromium to boot from hitting the "Dell Media" button instead of the power button would be very useful. Unfortunately, the Chrome OS is still not ready for Main stream use due to a lack of driver support, which is a shame.
ssj12 16th February 2010, 21:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyceo
The real problem they will face is the consumer. They only want to buy Windows. This isn't aimed at starting a flame war.

Every netbook sold with a linux distro has not gone on to success. As soon as they release the same model but with a Windows OS it sells a hell of alot more.

thats because the general consumer are idiots when it comes to PCs.
ernestBurney 17th February 2010, 16:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssj12
thats because the general consumer are idiots when it comes to PCs.

95% of consumers couldnt tell you the difference between a hard drive and a cpu. FACT.
DaMightyMouse 18th February 2010, 13:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by UncertainGod
Android & ChromeOS will merge soon enough, I see ChromeOS becoming more of an app package for net connected Android machines.

I thought all smart phones are net enable?
Saivert 22nd February 2010, 22:38 Quote
ChromeOS is just silly. It's just Linux with Fullscreen chrome slapped on top of it and not much more installed. You can easily root it and install more crap and use it just like Linux. Android on the other hand is a completely different beast, requires its own apps and a special programming SDK.
They could just as easily have made a ChromeOS with Windows at the base (just put chrome as the shell instead of Windows Explorer).
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