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Canonical due to get new CEO

Canonical due to get new CEO

Mark Shuttleworth is due to be replaced as CEO of Canonical - but promises to keep concentrating on the Ubuntu distribution.

Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical - the company behind popular Linux distribution Ubuntu - has announced that he is to step down from his role as chief executive officer from March 2010.

Shuttleworth announced the move in a press conference yesterday, claiming that the move would enable him to better focus on individual projects within the Ubuntu umbrella - including Canonical's newly-launched UbuntuOne cloud computing offering, which made its first appearance in Ubuntu 9.10 'Karmic Koala.'

In a prepared speech, Shuttleworth stated that "Ubuntu remains my primary focus," and that he is still dedicated to seeing "Ubuntu succeed as the open platform of choice for almost all use types whether on netbook, notebook, desktop, server, embedded device, or wherever people compute" - a goal which it is his "great privilege" to focus on now the CEO role is no longer his.

Shuttleworth is to be replaced at the helm by current chief operating officer Jane Silber who Shuttleworth describes as having "shared the leadership of Canonical" over the past few years.

Silber described herself as "excited about the role, energised by the opportunities in front of us, and humbled by the collection of amazing and talented individuals in Canonical and the Ubuntu community," and reassured Shuttleworth's fans that "Mark will continue to play a major role in Canonical."

Perhaps the biggest change for Canonical - and, by extension, the Ubuntu project - is that the head of the community which has built up around the increasingly popular Linux distribution is now no longer the CEO of the corporate entity behind it - something which Silber claims will be "helpful in both [the community and Canonical] achieving their joint and individual goals more quickly."

The move shouldn't affect the release of Ubuntu 10.04 'Lucid Lynx', the next long-term support release of the distribution which is due in April next year.

Are you surprised to see Canonical's founder replaced as CEO, or is it a smart move that gives him more time and freedom to exercise his not inconsiderable creative energies? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

7 Comments

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proxess 18th December 2009, 13:46 Quote
I was pretty surprised by the move, but I doubt it'll change much.
Farting Bob 18th December 2009, 19:24 Quote
Why are so many focusing on cloud computing and online services these days? It will always be a mini segment within a small niche, focusing on bringing ubuntu more into the mainstream will benefit the company more. Cloud computing makes headlines at the moment but few use it.
yakyb 18th December 2009, 20:09 Quote
i dont know i could see people using an online word processor / spreadsheet / presentation package if it is free
gnutonian 18th December 2009, 20:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yakyb
i dont know i could see people using an online word processor / spreadsheet / presentation package if it is free
There's nothing free about it. In the "cloud", you can't touch the code. Even if it comes at no cost, I can't see the advantages versus a locally stored file. People on the move can learn the miracle technique of "uploading".


Shuttleworth won't be missed (then again, sod Ubuntu). The man simply doesn't get free software and from his mailing list contributions he seems like a total dick. But the latter is just my opinion.


Right, pet peeve time, I'll put it in a small font!
Quote:
Canonical - the company behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution -
I don't use Ubuntu so I'm not an expert, but it comes without any GNU software whatsoever?! Amazing!

dicobalt 18th December 2009, 21:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farting Bob
Why are so many focusing on cloud computing and online services these days? It will always be a mini segment within a small niche, focusing on bringing ubuntu more into the mainstream will benefit the company more. Cloud computing makes headlines at the moment but few use it.

Companies like the cloud because it lets them control your information. Which means they can hold it hostage and charge absolutely silly fees. Just like cell phone providers.
confusis 19th December 2009, 08:41 Quote
Am i the only one who read that as Colonical?
Timmytomas 19th December 2009, 22:32 Quote
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