bit-tech.net

Office 14 delayed until 2010

Office 14 delayed until 2010

Ballmer has let slip that the release of Office 14 will now not take place until next year - possibly to coincide with the Windows 7 launch.

A passing comment by Microsoft chief executive officer Steve Ballmer has revealed that the release of Office 14 is to be pushed back to 2010, for reasons unknown.

During a “stragegy update” conference, PC Mag's Mark Hackman noticed Ballmer letting slip that the “next big innovation milestone [...] Office 14, our next Office release, will not be this year.” The reason for the delay isn't known – but has been confirmed by BetaNews – but Ballmer did also mention that despite no fully-fledged Office release this year the company will be launching updated versions of collaboration package Sharepoint, enterprise communications system Exchange, and the web-based Office Live document storage system.

Office 14, which comes as the successor to Office 12 – no-one could accuse Microsoft of failing to accommodate superstitious consumers – was originally due in the first half of 2009. Many believe that with the software mostly completed the delay is not technical but tactical, with the company looking to launch Windows 7 and Office 14 as close together as possible – in a similar move as the launch of Windows Vista and Office 12, which were but a few weeks apart.

Another interesting titbit for those keeping an eye on office suites is that Microsoft saw the need to drop the cost of Office 12 world-wide after the success of the open-source OpenOffice.org project saw many people eschewing the expensive proprietary suite in favour of a solution both free-as-in-speech and free-as-in-beer. This lower pricing structure is expected to continue with Office 14, as the competition from both web-based systems such as Google Docs and open-source offline office suites increases.

The final bit of news to come from Ballmer's briefing is the release of a lightweight version of Windows Server dubbed Foundation Edition, which will have lower system requirements and a smaller cost to OEMs. The move comes as an attempt to revitalise the small and home office server market by encouraging manufacturers to release 'netbook'-style servers – low-cost devices which are capable of a subset of functions that would be ordinarily performed by more expensive hardware.

Do you mourn the delay of Office 14, or are you still getting to grips with the new look of the last Office release? Perhaps you're more interested in Windows Server Foundation Edition? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

17 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
TGImages 25th February 2009, 14:06 Quote
Perhaps the economic situation has something to do with this decision too. If they released in 2009, most companies simply could not afford to buy an upgrade like this and their sales would look dismal. By waiting until things turn around (assumed) in 2010 they can show better sales numbers.
tank_rider 25th February 2009, 14:11 Quote
I like the idea of a cheap low power server operating system that gets rid of a lot of the big corporate stuff that home users don't need :)
perplekks45 25th February 2009, 14:40 Quote
Wait a second... you say it might be pushed into 2010 to be launched together or a couple of weeks after 7? Does that mean 7 won't be launched before Christmas?

Oh, come on! :(
Blademrk 25th February 2009, 15:25 Quote
I was hoping 7 would be launched shortly after the Beta finishes. I don't particularly want to move back to Vista in August once the Beta ends.
Redbeaver 25th February 2009, 15:31 Quote
so is office2007 codenamed office12? i didnt kno that....
dyzophoria 25th February 2009, 15:53 Quote
hmm, wasnt office 2007 released well ahead of vista?, i quite remember it running on alot of XP computers before vista, I was quite worried before if office 2007 would run in vista without any problems,lol
_DTM2000_ 25th February 2009, 16:37 Quote
I certainly don't think MS are holding back Office 14 so they can release it at the same time as Win7. I know someone in the Win7 beta program and he says Win7 should be on the shelves before Christmas 09 and probably quite a bit before. If it's anything to do with Win7 it's more likely because they want to concentrate on getting Win7 out the door as quickly as possible so it can start earning them some money.

Every Vista user I know can't wait until Win7 comes out so they can upgrade. There are also lots of XP users like my self who are holding back upgrading until Win7 comes out. I doubt there are many people who can't wait until Office 14 comes out. So upgrades to Office 14 will be a slow trickle. Win7 will make MS far more money. And in this economic climate that's what MS will want to focus on.
SnowCat 25th February 2009, 17:05 Quote
I don't know about you guys but I really hate Office 2007. It is the most uncomfortable suite I've ever used. Luckily for me I've got a chance to try it on my friend's computer. My decision was 'monosemantic' - never ever install it on my computer and stay with 2003 :) It seems like a keeper
jsheff 25th February 2009, 17:43 Quote
"I like the idea of a cheap low power server operating system that gets rid of a lot of the big corporate stuff that home users don't need :)"

Dude, Microsoft already offer this with Windows Home Server for around £60-80. It's a stripped down Windows Server 2003 that removes features that home users simply wouldn't need from the operating system.

Either that or use Linux, it's even better priced than WHS at a grand total of £0

Not sure if they mean WHS 2.0, or a "Windows Server 2008 Home Office Edition" by "Foundation Edition"
perplekks45 25th February 2009, 17:47 Quote
Well, there might be a Beta 2 or RC1 or something before Beta 1 ends but still I was hoping to switch to 7 retail before I leave to Austria [beginning of July]. :(
capnPedro 25th February 2009, 19:46 Quote
Office 2000
Office XP
Office 2003 (SP3 is Build 11.8237 FYI, so I guess 2007 is v12)
Office 2007
Office 14

Nice consistent naming scheme right there. [Windows] 7 * 2 = 14 so I guess it makes a little sense.
cpu121 25th February 2009, 20:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by capnPedro
Office 2000
Office XP
Office 2003 (SP3 is Build 11.8237 FYI, so I guess 2007 is v12)
Office 2007
Office 14

Nice consistent naming scheme right there. [Windows] 7 * 2 = 14 so I guess it makes a little sense.
AIUI its just a codename and the final product will be released as Office 201X depending on when it comes out just as Office 11 and 12 became 2003 and 2007 respectively.
Burdman27911 25th February 2009, 22:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowCat
I don't know about you guys but I really hate Office 2007. It is the most uncomfortable suite I've ever used. Luckily for me I've got a chance to try it on my friend's computer. My decision was 'monosemantic' - never ever install it on my computer and stay with 2003 :) It seems like a keeper

That was my initial reaction as well, but now I actually like it more than 2003 after getting used to where everything is. I think the changes were for the better, but any change at all is usually not welcomed.
TomH 25th February 2009, 23:03 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheff
"I like the idea of a cheap low power server operating system that gets rid of a lot of the big corporate stuff that home users don't need :)"

Dude, Microsoft already offer this with Windows Home Server for around £60-80. It's a stripped down Windows Server 2003 that removes features that home users simply wouldn't need from the operating system.

Either that or use Linux, it's even better priced than WHS at a grand total of £0

Not sure if they mean WHS 2.0, or a "Windows Server 2008 Home Office Edition" by "Foundation Edition"
This was my initial reaction; although it was more along the lines of, "Well, that's aimed straight at the low-power Epia/Atom servers that run Linux and serve up shares, printers, etc."

However, I would imagine given that WHS has been about as successful as Vista; they'll try to incorporate it into the Windows Server line.. Which is good.. It'll make far more sense to do it that way for the 2008 version. :)

Still, I'll keep Ubuntu for my SME office needs, thanks.
The_EXorcist 26th February 2009, 00:36 Quote
Well i think i'll stick with OpenOffice either way, as i dont have much need for office anyway, so no point changing

And a cheaper version of Server would be nice, im using Windows Server 2008 Enterprise atm, didnt want to use Vista, and this got around that, very very stable OS
nicae 26th February 2009, 14:32 Quote
I wonder if the "innovation milestone" expected for Office 14 is the subscription model. I hope it isn't, for Microsoft's sake...

Anyway, a great great great alternative is running OpenOffice in Ubuntu in Windows via VMWare. I'm currently running Ubuntu64 in my XP 32bit environment at home, and it's awesome at helping to prepare for a full-scale migration up-front. I know it's not much use to run 64-bit yet, but I was curious to check it out. Anyway, thanks to the awesome software that VMWare is, I can simply delete the Ubuntu64 virtual PC in seconds and rebuild a new machine with any 32-bit Linux distro should I wish to do so. The best part: For free! :D

OpenOffice is very nice and it's macro programming environment has some nice touches itself. Not to mention it can save files for MS Office!
(I'm basically an Excel/Calc user)
perplekks45 26th February 2009, 17:32 Quote
I never really liked OO but I absolutely love MSO 2007. Once you get used to the ribbon UI it's just a joy to use... at least for me.
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums