bit-tech.net

The RIAA has lost touch with reality

The RIAA has lost touch with reality

Has the RIAA completely and utterly lost the plot?

When we thought that the recording industry’s fate couldn’t get any worse, the RIAA drops another bombshell that goes to show that it really has lost touch with reality.

CNet’s Don Reisinger managed to get in contact with Cara Duckworth, a representative for the RIAA, and asked ten straight questions to give the organisation a chance to clear the bad blood. Sadly for music fans, the answers that came back could prove even more damning than the crusade the RIAA has been on for the past couple of years.

Duckworth said that its latest round of action against students, which includes 407 pre-litigation settlement letters sent to 18 universities in the US, was “by no means our first choice, but a necessary step we had to take.

But given that the only alternative that the RIAA has offered up was to actively invest resources “in the education of students of all ages on the value of music and the importance of copyrights,” there isn’t a lot of evidence to suggest that the bullying tactics it has employed in recent times aren’t its favourite deterrent.

When Reisinger asked Duckworth why the RIAA was going after an easy target, the response tells you everything you need to know about the RIAA’s current vision. “College students have reached a stage in life when their music habits are crystallised, and their appreciation for intellectual property has not yet reached its full development,” said Duckworth.

Out of everything that Duckworth said, this is probably the standout statement that shows why the recording industry has really lost touch with its customer base – it really is a sorry state of affairs. Duckworth later stated that college students “used to be some of music’s biggest fans, unfortunately that is no longer the case.” That couldn’t be farther from the truth and Duckworth is essentially saying that students that illegally download music aren’t fans of music – insulting the intelligence of one of the recording industry’s biggest customer bases isn’t going to close the flood gates.

Later in the interview, Duckworth did say that the RIAA wants to take action against those that are facilitating mass piracy, but the organisation is still working with the US Government to encourage countries to bring their copyright laws in line with those in the United States. In the meantime, it seems like the organisation is quite happy to continue going after the easy target, which the RIAA believes is working – even though independent studies suggest otherwise. A recent study from NPD says that only 50 percent of Mac users paid for their music in the third quarter of 2007, while 84 percent of PC users chose not to pay for music in the same quarter.

There’s much, much more to read on CNet’s The Digital Home blog – don’t forget to drop into the forums to share your thoughts with us.

21 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
iwog 15th January 2008, 13:59 Quote
I thought we had figured this out already? But its always nice to have it confirmed.
seanap 15th January 2008, 13:59 Quote
There's only one word to sum this up...

Wow.

This is just outrageous. I'm going to go off and listen to music I'm not a fan of now...
mmorgue 15th January 2008, 14:01 Quote
Why bother anymore. The RIAA has sealed it's fate by sticking to outdated consumer models. They'll never beat the system with their heavy handed, "sue-them-all" approach.

They know their primary means of revenue gathering [CD] is coming to an end. And until they come up with a solution that the *consumer* wants, not what the RIAA wants, then the RIAA will never win.
Xtrafresh 15th January 2008, 14:25 Quote
Online content selling should have been through the roof by now. The only reason that sharing networks got as big as they did is that nobody else is offering decent content online.

I'd pay a few bucks to download a movie in fact, i do that every time i order one through my on-demand service or rent out a video.
I'd pay up to 10-15 euros to download a good game. Cut out all the need for distributors etc etc and that IS a profitable amount, no matter what anyone else says.
Milions pay a dollar a song already at iTunes.

Downloading as a customer model can work great.

RIAA is dieing a slow, violent and painful death, and these are some of their latest convulsions. Sooner or later, the pockets of the industry are empty, and RIAA will not be funded anymore.
I find these things rather amusing. The stronger they try not to talk with customers and work on actual solutions, the less guilty i have to feel about getting free content :D
DXR_13KE 15th January 2008, 14:49 Quote
I think the RIAA are talking about Mars or something, maybe Uranus......
TTmodder 15th January 2008, 15:37 Quote
Can i have some of the drugs the RIAA guys are on???





No seriusly can i???
TreeDude 15th January 2008, 15:45 Quote
The downloading of games is getting more and more popular (just look at Steam). Music got hung up on DRM, but it is getting better now with more and more companies going DRM-free (iTunes is the big player that needs to switch).

I wonder what will happen when the RIAA's pockets are empty...
coniferous 15th January 2008, 16:02 Quote
Quote:
the RIAA wants to take action against those that are facilitating mass piracy, but the organisation is still working with the US Government to encourage countries to bring their copyright laws in line with those in the United States.

HA! HAHAHA!


RIAW - Recording Industry Association of The WORLD.

Yeah, good luck with that. Its pretty freeking cocky to be saying that you know better then the rest of the countrys in the world.
Seriously, thats the stupidest thing that I've ever heard.
TTmodder 15th January 2008, 16:03 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TreeDude

I wonder what will happen when the RIAA's pockets are empty...

http://www.2spare.com/_media/imgs/articles/a145_h12.jpg

:)
Wicz 15th January 2008, 18:06 Quote
Yes it's quite clear that the many millions of students all over the world who are actively downloading music illegally, actually aren't fans of it.....?

What a complete and utter Duckworth :)
pendragon 15th January 2008, 18:26 Quote
my bullsh*t detector is going off.. that's normal, right?
TreeDude 15th January 2008, 18:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wicz
Yes it's quite clear that the many millions of students all over the world who are actively downloading music illegally, actually aren't fans of it.....?

What a complete and utter Duckworth :)

I'd say yes and no. People may download an album of an artist they are not sure if they like because they have only heard 1 song. The rest of the album could be complete crap. I personally always buy the albums from artists I love. There are other that I listen to that are ok, or maybe are so popular they really don't need my album sale. I listen to some music that never hits the radio, so I'd rather buy their album than someone that is on the radio every 8 seconds.

But I'll be honest if it were not for the sharing of music (on the internet or even a friend tossing a copy of a CD my way) there are many artists I would not know about. My favorite band (Jimmy Eat World) I found out about when a friend gave me a copy of one of their CDs and told me to take a listen. I have been hooked ever since. It is things like that that the RIAA don't understand.

If no one shared music than the little guys would be no where and we would only have the radio to find new music. That would suck big time (because the radio pretty much sucks, there are a few exceptions though).
sheepdog 15th January 2008, 20:07 Quote
Lets look at what the music industry has done for US.

In the 50's and before it was musicians controlling things. Big business came in, and it all became about money.
Since then they constantly gambled, dumped money and spent more. Sort of like the stock market, they hedge their bets and then run a streak into the ground.
Throw enough stuff at fans, you will eventually find a hit.

The death of record stores.
They wanted to mass market to Walmart, well, record stores especially mom and pop stores understood their customers wants and needs and would help you locate what you were looking for. Do you honestly think Walmart does? Do you think Walmart will carry or order that extra rare import of my favorite band, how about a shirt? Will the employee know that I like Pink Floyd and be able to recomend me something similar? Will the typical WalMart employee even know who Pink Floyd is? Would they care. Nope. Just they would rather just stock more Brittany Spears. Not to mention many people do not want to go near Walmart.

It only gets worse from there.


They cannot control themselves.
Vanilla Ice.. Top of the world overplayed.
Backstreet Boys.. Top of the world, overplayed.
Before them, they did the same to the Gibb brothers. They can hardly get airplay except strictly disco stations and clubs.
There are tons and tons more of cases like this.
Any major act that they could promote out the yang they did until the artist was loathed by the public.

They constantly miss understand the demographics.
Perfect example, grunge. They never saw it coming. How did they fix it, they went to Seattle and signed every decent band.
Emo. Again, totally missed it, in fact they ignored it so much, the independent artists and labels created their own (which is another problem for them, anyone can distribute these days).
Rap, same scenario, they never saw it coming. In fact, instead of investing in rap and grunge, they instead ran glam rock into the ground or tried to get rap stations off the air.

Then they wonder why fans are ticked.
They screw over hard working artists, and fans now know about it. Remember TLC, at their peak year each member made $50k dollars while at the top of the charts.
They refuse to deliver content how users want it.
Expect you to buy a separate copy for any place you want to listen.
They sue the fans.

Now they cannot understand the internet. DUH! They cannot even understand their own industry, how do you expect them to understand something as complex as world wide users, laws, and internet distribution.
Cadillac Ferd 15th January 2008, 20:59 Quote
I really do not understand how an organization big, wielding that much influence can have absolutely no clue about pretty much anything.
zoom314 15th January 2008, 21:03 Quote
I made My own MP3 CD of files from CDs I legally bought Years ago for use in My Car, I'd rather do that then risk damaging the old store bought CDs themselves, Of course the RIAA doesn't understand that and They also don't make any Music today that I'm interested in buying, At least the Movies on DVD that I buy are interesting. The music? nothiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiggg!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
salesman 16th January 2008, 06:55 Quote
RIAA is just the tip of the iceberg thats being pushed by fat cats (or dogs if you're a cat person) to do there dirty work, i mean come on they are like lawyers for mobsters somebody in a suit that has clean hands with a name like Duckworth... or should i said Quackworth. Does this rep even listen to music? I'd like to know his listening habits. He needs to turn up his stereo loud enough to blow the (insert explicit here) out his ears. WAKEUP PEOPLE!!!!!!!!!!
outlawaol 16th January 2008, 08:01 Quote
Wow.. crazy sob's.

Perhaps we should be sure the coipious ammounts of data we are inadvertitly spamming into outer space is also being listened to with proper paying methods, ET better be sure he has CC ready.....
hawky84 16th January 2008, 15:02 Quote
isn't that that point of downloading a song for free... to see if you like it, then decide whether or not it is worth purchasing?
naokaji 16th January 2008, 15:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by hawky84
isn't that that point of downloading a song for free... to see if you like it, then decide whether or not it is worth purchasing?

no, the point in downloading is giving the riaa an everlasting erec**on when making up the latest damage claims about stuff noone would buy anyway even if the internet wouldnt exist.

/sarcasm off

riaa loosing touch with reality? i dont know how they can loose what they never had.
Major 16th January 2008, 15:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by hawky84
isn't that that point of downloading a song for free... to see if you like it, then decide whether or not it is worth purchasing?

Whole point in downloading music illegally is to not pay £10 for an Album, if you can get it for free, why pay for it?
OleJ 17th January 2008, 05:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Major
Quote:
Originally Posted by hawky84
isn't that that point of downloading a song for free... to see if you like it, then decide whether or not it is worth purchasing?

Whole point in downloading music illegally is to not pay £10 for an Album, if you can get it for free, why pay for it?

Bah! Humbug! For years I've been wanting the musicians I like to have a site where I could go buy their albums in a digital format and pay directly to them.
Whether going to a record store or walmart it is really hard to find the stuff that I listen to and ever since the RIAA sued their first customer I've been appalled by their business.
So yeah everybody wants music. And everybody wants to support the artists they like. But NOBODY wants to support music in the shape of an industry.
The RIAA probably knows this and they are just trying to survive as long as possible using current models instead of putting their real world assets to good use.
RIAA == failure
Music is not a product and with the internet and the digital age enabling worldwide digital copies on the internet cloud technology has cemented this fact.
As a digital copy is not a physical product the incentive to pay for it is hard to find. The love for the music is the incentive for the fan to tribute the artist. This makes a delicate connection between music lover and artist and if you put an evil corporation renowned for suing people who love music and screwing over artists into the equation then it falls apart.

It's sad for those who can't see that Love =I= Capital
Luckily for them you can always go buy a wife from Russia or Thailand or go down to the red light district where "Loving"==Capital where they by the way pay directly to the artist.

/Out
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums