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Samsung launches 500GB laptop drive

Samsung launches 500GB laptop drive

While this isn't a pic of the new Samsung drive, they all look pretty durn similar with the lid off.

Liked the look of the Hitachi 500GB laptop drive only to feel a crushing sense of bitter disappointment when you realised it wouldn't fit in your existing laptop? Yeah, well, Samsung's got your back.

The company has announced the new Spinpoint M6 500GB, which is a standard-height drive suitable for pretty much any laptop (BIOS support for such large drives permitting).

Other than the voluminous capacity, the specs aren't anything to get excited about: a spindle speed of 5,400RPM, 8MB of cache, and the same SATA 3.0Gb/s interface and rotational vibration sensor we saw on the Hitachi model.

One feature that isn't on the Hitachi is something Samsung describes as “Flying on Demand head technology”, which the company claims will improve data stability over varying temperature ranges.

Andy Higginbotham, director of hard drive sales and marketing at Samsung, took the opportunity of the products CES launch to have a little dig at the non-standard effort from rival Hitachi, saying “Our Spinpoint M6 500GB extends the data storage capacity for notebook PCs and readily fits within the tens of millions of notebook PCs that ship every quarter with no modification to the notebook PC chassis”.

While he didn't actually sayunlike those suckers at Hitachi”, it's a pretty clear subtext. Rather interestingly, Andy was silent as to the power usage of the new drive: could it be that the Hitachi can scrape a draw on points?

Tempted, or are you still hooked on SSD technology? Give us your thoughts over in the forums.

9 Comments

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DougEdey 7th January 2008, 11:53 Quote
Nice, now we just need to know about power drain Consumption
DXR_13KE 7th January 2008, 12:21 Quote
lots of portable porn.......
i am also interested in the power consumption of it....
wolff000 7th January 2008, 13:37 Quote
nice but spinning drive in a portable device just seems to last century. I want some ssd at a decent price already.
TGImages 7th January 2008, 14:09 Quote
SSD is where I expect to be as soon as the price is a bit more competitive... however the market for larger drives like this being used in external cases or as secondary drives will be around for quite awhile yet.
Sark.inc 7th January 2008, 14:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TGImages
SSD is where I expect to be as soon as the price is a bit more competitive... however the market for larger drives like this being used in external cases or as secondary drives will be around for quite awhile yet.

hdds will always be cheaper to make will they not?

if so they will always be around then..
sandys 7th January 2008, 14:26 Quote
probably has piss poor performance like most laptop drives :( , the solid state stuff can't come down in price quick enough if you ask me.
DXR_13KE 7th January 2008, 14:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandys
probably has piss poor performance like most laptop drives :( , the solid state stuff can't come down in price quick enough if you ask me.

with the increased density of data normal 500Gb Hds surpass the 10K raptor in terms of speed...... 500Gb on a slowish laptop hard drive may make it stupidly fast compared to earlier smaller hard drives....

anyway the future is for solid state......
TTmodder 7th January 2008, 15:20 Quote
Stop developing ordinary hdd´s .Gimme high performance long lasting cheap ssd´s NOW :(
Anakha 8th January 2008, 02:25 Quote
I still want to see standard flash modules connected in a RAID-Like system, so instead of reads and writes hitting one flash unit only in sequence, you get multiple reads/writes happening simultaneously, and massively increased bandwidth. That way you'd have the best of both worlds: 0 seek time, and high-speed data transfer, all in one package.

If you could find a system that would let you do it, you could simulate an array like that by RAID0'ing a load of USB2 memory sticks together. But XP/Vista won't let you do that and Linux is flaky at best. I've heard you can RAID anything in OSX, but I don't have a Mac to test that hypothesis.
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