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YouTube to filter out pirated video by September

YouTube to filter out pirated video by September

A Google lawyer told a US District Court on Friday that YouTube hopes to launch a new piracy prevention system in September.

A Google lawyer told the US District Court for the Southern District of New York on Friday that YouTube hopes to launch a new piracy prevention system in September that’s designed to stop copyright videos appearing on the site.

Phillip Beck, who represented YouTube and parent company Google, said that the video sharing site plans to generate a library of digital video fingerprints that would be used to check clips being uploaded for copyrighted material – a process that would take a matter of minutes.

After numerous class action lawsuits against the video sharing site, Google and YouTube have repeatedly promised to implement better copyright protections, but the two are yet to deliver on those promises.

This new technology, which is claimed to be as sophisticated as the FBI’s fingerprint technology, should “hopefully eliminate such disputes in the future,” said Beck. He then added that the Internet giant believes the technology goes to greater lengths in preventing copyright infringement than the law requires.

The lawsuits against YouTube were combined for trial purposes and lawyers representing the copyright owners suing the video sharing site said that they would welcome any improvement that prevents copyright infringement. However, they think YouTube should have acted much sooner than it is.

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15 Comments

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Almightyrastus 29th July 2007, 14:06 Quote
Great....... this means that Youtube will only be host to poorly done phone cam clips of irritating little girls who think they can dance and wannabes who are under the delusion they can sing, either that or video bloggers who bore us with their dreary lives and pointless opinions.
Phil Rhodes 29th July 2007, 14:23 Quote
Quite.

I believe this period will probably be remembered as the time a major commercial bloc has ever looked at a market screaming for its wares and said "Eh... no thanks."

Phil
Lazarus Dark 29th July 2007, 14:29 Quote
Quote:
lawyers representing the copyright owners suing the video sharing site said that they would welcome any improvement that prevents copyright infringement.
Not likely. If in fact all "copyright infringement" was stopped, lawyers and companies who make their money from lawsuits would not be happy. Lawsuits are big buisiness. I doubt any of these companies really want what they say they want. They want money and these lawsuits make more money than their actual products.
Particle Man 29th July 2007, 14:42 Quote
I just wish the American Justice system would say enough is enough and quit allowing these kinda of lawsuits. It's really getting old, there's no way to stop it.

I saw an article recently showing evidence that, since the RIAA started filing lawsuits agianst people for downloading music, the number of people downloading has actually increased. And by a rather large margin.
Breach 29th July 2007, 15:07 Quote
I dont see why they bother, it will be circumvented with ease as any kind of DRM or other copy protection. I think it is time the video and music markets get with the times and come up with something new that doesn't involve suing their own customers.
francisl1420 29th July 2007, 15:26 Quote
As soon as they stop one site hosting pirated stuff, it'll pop up two other sites.
completemadness 29th July 2007, 17:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by francisl1420
As soon as they stop one site hosting pirated stuff, it'll pop up two other sites.
QFT - people will always find a way around this stuff, if its not another site, probably just a way to get round the blocking system in you tube (perhaps a watermark on the film would break it ?)
Amon 29th July 2007, 18:58 Quote
Bummer. They started cracking down on all the Best Motoring videos... those DVDs are expensive to import!
FooSai 29th July 2007, 19:17 Quote
Wonder what effect this will have on things like remix clips. I don't have a problem with them pulling down full movies and TV shows, but there are plenty of videos where copyrighted material has been used for backing music, small segments of video. Will this new system pull things like that off?
Phil Rhodes 29th July 2007, 19:23 Quote
If they start doing image recognition on all the files, then that could actually be quite difficult to circumvent. It would also be massively expensive (in terms of processor and storage) to implement.

Phil
Joeymac 29th July 2007, 23:41 Quote
What kind of image recognition could they implement though? Are they going to look for all famous people's faces and then check if they are in the clips??
I don't see they could do much more than analyse the source of the video.. camera phones and DV video will have a different look and "digital signature" from film.. but with everyone transcoding everything and TV mostly done in DV nowadays....is any of that going to possibly work?
How are they going to do it?
DXR_13KE 30th July 2007, 00:40 Quote
bye bye AMVs, snips of movies and decent videos.... this will be the demise of youtube....
proxess 30th July 2007, 01:47 Quote
"We control what videos you watch. We control where you navigate. We control what shows up on your screen. We control you!" Welcome to the land of the free!
Havok154 30th July 2007, 04:45 Quote
I can't wait till the day the entertainment industry goes bankrupt and they wonder where they went wrong.
Phil Rhodes 31st July 2007, 00:28 Quote
All they can do is keep clips of material they want to protect, and do some very, very fuzzy pattern matching on it.

Which is going to cost a fortune.

Phil
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