The Independent on Sunday reports that pressure is mounting on the Health Protection Agency to launch a formal investigation into the use of Wi-Fi technologies and any adverse effects they could pose to users, especially in schools.

Sir William Stewart, chairman of the HPA, is calling for pupils in schools to be monitored for any ill effects from Wi-fi networks which "emit radiation and are being installed in classrooms across the nation."

Some scientists fear that Wi-Fi can cause cancer and premature senility -- some provincial governments across Europe already ban or limit the use of it in the classroom. Stowe School has reportedly partially removed Wi-Fi after a teacher became ill.

The pressure also comes from PAT, the Professional Association of Teachers, who are writing to the government to demand an official inquiry into what the Department of Education and Skills calls a "magical" system.

Yes, the Department of Education believes that Wi-Fi is 'magic'. Sensationalists across the country expect Bill Gates will soon be burned at the stake for techno-heresy.

A rational observer might also wonder at the proposed methods of the inquiry into what The Independent on Sunday calls 'electronic smog'. Observing schools with Wi-Fi systems in place and seeing how many sickdays children take doesn't seem exactly idiot-proof.

That said, an objective and scientific investigation into Wi-Fi may be a good idea given the limited information currently available on the topic. While investigators are at it, why not look at other massively available technologies that also transmit wirelessly like mobile phones or the Nintendo DS?

Cautious about Wi-Fi? Won't use a wireless mouse in case your hand drops off? Come to the forums and let us know!

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