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Seasonic confirms list of Haswell compatible power supplies

Seasonic confirms list of Haswell compatible power supplies

Seasonic's passive Platinum PSUs are among those compatible with Haswell.

Following concerns that some power supplies will not function properly with Intel's upcoming Haswell processors, Seasonic has joined in confirming which of its current models will work with the new chips.

The issue stems from Intel Haswell processors having a new ultra low-power state, called ZERO-load, that can cause some power supplies to fail when the CPU tries to return to a high-power state.

In response, power supply manufacturers are now starting to confirm which of its models will be compatible with Haswell CPUs - the answer is most of them, assuming they're reasonably high-end.

Corsair recently outlined the issue, saying: "Even if the sleeping CPU is the only load on the +12V rail, most power supplies can handle a load this low. The potential problem comes up when there is still a substantial load on the power supply's non-primary rails (the +3.3V and +5V). If the load on these non-primary rails are above a certain threshold (which varies by PSU), the +12V can go out of spec (voltages greater than +12.6V). If the +12V is out of spec when the motherboard comes out of the sleep state, the PSU's protection may prevent the PSU from running and will cause the power supply to "latch off". This will require the user to cycle the power on their power supply using the power switch on the back of the unit.

Seasonic is the latest manufacturer to list which of its power supplies do not suffer from this problem. They are as follows:

X Series
  • 650 W
  • 750 W
  • 850 W
  • 1050 W
  • 1250 W
Platinum
  • 660 W
  • 760 W
  • 860 W
  • 1000 W
  • 1200 W
Platinum Fanless
  • 400 W
  • 460 W
  • 520 W
M12II
  • 650 W
  • 750 W
  • 850 W
G Series
  • 360 W
  • 450 W
  • 550 W
  • 650 W


This leaves the following model's as non-certified:

M12II: 520 W, 620 W
S12II: All
M12D: All
SS: All

The full list of Seasonic power supplies can be found here.

Other manufacturers to confirm compatibility already include Enermax, OCZ and as previously mentioned Corsair.

Will you be upgrading to Haswell? Does it look like you'll need to invest in a new power supply? Let us know in the forum.

6 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Tyrmot 14th May 2013, 17:11 Quote
Haswell... nah.. not much point in replacing the 2500K yet.. maybe next gen!
RichCreedy 14th May 2013, 17:44 Quote
I've only just replaced my core 2 quad q6850 extreme processor so, I don't think I can justify another new one just yet
Phil Rhodes 14th May 2013, 18:52 Quote
Have to ask

I have a core i7 950. It seems that more recent processors are only really incrementally faster, unless I do something like get a hex core CPU (and then I could just get a hex i7).

So what would I get by upgrading?
r3loaded 14th May 2013, 20:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
Have to ask

I have a core i7 950. It seems that more recent processors are only really incrementally faster, unless I do something like get a hex core CPU (and then I could just get a hex i7).

So what would I get by upgrading?

Power efficiency (84W TDP vs 130W), native support for SATA 6Gbps/USB 3.0/PCIe 3.0, UEFI support and the fast booting goodness it brings as well as performance improvements and far more overclockability.

Not really an absolute must-have for Nehalem owners but definitely for Core 2 owners. You'll probably want to upgrade when Skylake rolls around though ;)

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2
edzieba 15th May 2013, 10:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes
Have to ask

I have a core i7 950. It seems that more recent processors are only really incrementally faster, unless I do something like get a hex core CPU (and then I could just get a hex i7).

So what would I get by upgrading?
For gaming? Almost nothing. Only in severe edge cases (e.g. Civ V) will you notice any improvement in framerates (I haven't seen a CPU showdown using frame timing, but I suspect that is so GPU dependent it'd be a wash).

For other tasks? A bit of an improvement to a massive improvement. Specifically, encoding video and rendering images. If you don't do either of these, you needn't bother upgrading, but if you do encode video (and I mean properly with x264 and a decent CRF, quicksync may be fast but the picture quality is shite) you will see improvements from upgrading.
RichCreedy 15th May 2013, 15:34 Quote
one of the reasons I upgraded my core 2 proc, was I wanted to start playing with the new hyper-v stuff, only newer procs have the required virtualisation technologies.
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