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SlySoft: Blu-ray fully cracked

SlySoft: Blu-ray fully cracked

The BD+ DRM technology used on commercial Blu-ray discs has been well and truly broken by SlySoft's AnyDVD software.

The ongoing war between the pro- and anti-DRM crowds continues with the news that SlySoft has released a new version of its AnyDVD HD duplication software capable of breaking the protection on “all commercial Blu-ray releases.

According to BetaNews, the Antigua-based company has created a new version – 6.5.0.3 – of its software which makes light work of the much-vaunted BD+ protection built into commercially produced Blu-ray films. This latest version, described in traditionally tactful terms by the company as “incredible magic,” allows on-the-fly duplication of commercial Blu-ray discs without the need for an HDCP-compliant display device.

This isn't the first time that the company has claimed a breakthrough against the Macrovision-owned BD+ technology: we reported back in March that SlySoft had completed the work of cracking the protection technology. With BD+, however, that's never the end of the story: Macrovision's innovative DRM system allows for the underlying codes to be changed on a whim – meaning that it only takes a single update from the company to render SlySoft's work moot.

SlySoft, which takes advantage of lax copyright and intellectual property laws in Antigua to sell its software commercially via the Internet, is increasingly aware of this shortcoming: while previous versions of AnyDVD have come with a policy of free lifetime updates, the company is planning to offer an annual update scheme instead from January next year in order to cover the costs of attacking a continually-shifting target.

Despite the increased difficulties in breaking BD+ compared to the CSS system used by DVDs, it's clear that the content protection companies are on the losing side of this continuing battle.

Do you applaud SlySoft's efforts to show big business that efforts at DRM are ultimately futile, or is the company just attempting to make a quick buck at the expense of the IP holders? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

28 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
outlawaol 31st December 2008, 09:54 Quote
It dosnt surprise me at all. After all, anything that can be engineered can be reversed engineered. Although with BD media costing upwards of the movies themselves, I dont see the point in making an on the fly duplicate. Your better off just buying it again. But I guess in the sense of 'media pc' this can be useful. After all, who wants to actually change discs out when you can have your entire library on a few TB's?
notatoad 31st December 2008, 10:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by the article
With BD+, however, that's never the end of the story: Macrovision's innovative DRM system allows for the underlying codes to be changed on a whim – meaning that it only takes a single update from the company to render SlySoft's work moot.

as i understand it, bd+ stores the decryption algorithm on the disc, but it only runs in a specific virtual machine on the bd+ compatible player. what slysoft has done is emulate the VM, so that even if macrovision decides to require a different decryption algorithm, the software can just read the new algorithm off the disk and start using it. the software should continue to work even after an update to the bd+ drm.
Nature 31st December 2008, 10:30 Quote
macromergerfundlepants


and then some!
capnPedro 31st December 2008, 11:09 Quote
AnyDVD is worth the purchase price purely for the fact it lets you skip past those anti-piracy messages ("You wouldn't shoot a policeman. You wouldn't go to the toilet in the policeman's hat. You wouldn't mail the hat to his widow" etc.) and even skip the pointless "Do you really want to play the film you put in?" menus.

Oh and making your PC region free is a bonus too.

I've been completely satisfied with AnyDVD on my HTPC for a couple of years now. It really is a great program, with some obviously talented programmers.
azrael- 31st December 2008, 12:14 Quote
AnyDVD (HD) is a great little piece of software. Even though I buy my DVDs (mostly when they're on sale) I bought the program because I applaud Slysoft's efforts to rid us of the tyranny of DRM. I can only urge everyone to buy a license too.
D3s3rt_F0x 31st December 2008, 13:08 Quote
Viva la resistance
ashchap 31st December 2008, 13:47 Quote
Has anyone pirated AnyDVD? And if so, have they basked in the irony?
Mister_Tad 31st December 2008, 13:54 Quote
Great, now I'm going to need significantly more HDD space on my media server :(

Actually, having done the maths, I'll stick to disc swapping for now.
WildThing 31st December 2008, 13:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ashchap
Has anyone pirated AnyDVD? And if so, have they basked in the irony?

Lol!!! I'm sure they have.
WhiskeyAlpha 31st December 2008, 14:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister_Tad
Great, now I'm going to need significantly more HDD space on my media server :(

Actually, having done the maths, I'll stick to disc swapping for now.

Whilst I can totally understand the reasoning behind sticking blu-ray disks on an HTPC/media server and being able to stream it to any machine in the house, as Tad points out, at 50GB a pop you'll need some serious amount of HDD space to be able to include all but your very few favourites. A 1TB HDD might only support 20 dual layer blu-ray movies, and financially, it doesn't make sense (about £4 to store each one).

Even a moderate DVD collection can begin to quickly overwhelm your storage when you are doing 1:1 copies.

Bring on the cheap, supersize HDDs please!
Redbeaver 31st December 2008, 14:53 Quote
great piece of software, AnyDVD. just great.
salesman 31st December 2008, 17:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiskeyAlpha
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister_Tad
Great, now I'm going to need significantly more HDD space on my media server :(

Actually, having done the maths, I'll stick to disc swapping for now.

Whilst I can totally understand the reasoning behind sticking blu-ray disks on an HTPC/media server and being able to stream it to any machine in the house, as Tad points out, at 50GB a pop you'll need some serious amount of HDD space to be able to include all but your very few favourites. A 1TB HDD might only support 20 dual layer blu-ray movies, and financially, it doesn't make sense (about £4 to store each one).

Even a moderate DVD collection can begin to quickly overwhelm your storage when you are doing 1:1 copies.

Bring on the cheap, supersize HDDs please!


There's a lot of BD that are not duel layer and furthermore the size of the video file is smaller still. Today's generation BD don't have video files at 50gigs. http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/AHABFECTNE15I/ref=cm_cr_pr_auth_rev?ie=UTF8&sort_by=MostRecentReview This is the most useful review I've found for BD check it out.
kylew 31st December 2008, 18:12 Quote
While some BDs are 50GB, well it's actually 44GB, I'm guessing that most people who take the time to rip their BDs to their computers won't mind re-encoding the ripped files to compress the file size down.

You can get some really good quality BD rips that weigh in at about 8GB, and when using some efficient codecs for the compression, you can end up with a video that's indistinguishable from the original source, well almost anyway.
serial_ 31st December 2008, 18:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ashchap
Has anyone pirated AnyDVD? And if so, have they basked in the irony?

<.<
>.>

no, never...


SlySoft is forever and always my huggable, lovable, cuddlable snuggy-bear. With gigabit ethernet and a massive file server in the bedroom closet, this is a one-way ticket to media heaven.

Now that i'm done lauding the praises of slysoft, I must recommend that you not only use it, but pirate it, then rip a hard-copy pirate version of some film still in theaters.

It's like flushing all the toilets in an office building at the same time: simply magical.
DXR_13KE 31st December 2008, 20:25 Quote
it was going to be cracked sooner or later...
The_Gimpy 31st December 2008, 20:37 Quote
It's still probably cheaper to buy hd space then to buy blank blu ray discs. For the time being anyways.
HourBeforeDawn 31st December 2008, 21:15 Quote
I hate HDCP, really there is no point to it other then to punish people, I have a DoubleSight 30" DS-305W LCD and I cant watch Blu-Ray on it because its not HDCP, so pisses me off so I have to rip my movies onto my system just to watch it. ~_~
Major 31st December 2008, 23:00 Quote
Normal BR rips off the net are around 4-5GB.
Ending Credits 31st December 2008, 23:22 Quote
Quote:
"You wouldn't shoot a policeman. You wouldn't go to the toilet in the policeman's hat. You wouldn't mail the hat to his widow"

Where's that from again?
HourBeforeDawn 31st December 2008, 23:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Major
Normal BR rips off the net are around 4-5GB.

are you confusing DVD? The smallest Blu-Ray rip where it was just the movie no other content in ite original format was like 14gb, the ones online are probably compressed which defeats the point of blu-ray and hi-def
Notional 1st January 2009, 03:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ending Credits
Quote:
"You wouldn't shoot a policeman. You wouldn't go to the toilet in the policeman's hat. You wouldn't mail the hat to his widow"

Where's that from again?
The IT Crowd:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d82Lq2rVB_4

Thank God for Slysoft. Why would any company punish their paying costumers? It's beyond me.
Bursar 1st January 2009, 12:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Notional
Thank God for Slysoft. Why would any company punish their paying costumers? It's beyond me.
All cosplayers should be punished!
Ren 1st January 2009, 23:42 Quote
Is there really a need for other video software? WMP is enought for me :P
jamesthebard 2nd January 2009, 04:23 Quote
Slysoft is the reason people can actually use their media the way they want to. We don't 'rent' these discs, we buy them (unless your infringing) and we'd like to do what we please with them so we don't have to buy them yet again. AnyDVD HD is an awesome program and I wish them the best of luck at whatever challenges BD+ throws at 'em again.

As far as the rips are concerned, they are huge when uncompressed. Most of the rips you see on the net are scaled down to 720p which will save a bit of space. Also, depends on the codec that was used to encode the video on the disk.

I'm in the process of ripping the BD's I have to a media server, and I'm hitting anything around 2GB to 3.5GB at 720p with Dolby Digital 5.1 at 448Kbps. Even at 4GB to 5GB a shot, storage is real cheap and gives you a way to keep those BD's in a closet. I think I've seen a few 1080p's around at around 8-9GB as well. I haven't taken a look at any of them though as far as quality goes.

As far as another software player, I never was a fan of WMP. Too big and not really worth it IMHO. VLC/Media Player Classic tend to work better for me on my computer for videos but YMMV.
boiled_elephant 2nd January 2009, 07:58 Quote
On a slight tangent, my God Of War DVD has a compulsory, unskippable Mars Bar advert. That's ****ing appalling. I didn't mind when it was the legal "plz don't steel this film kthx!" messages, but an unskippable American confectionery advert on a DVD is too much like being told to bend over and think of England. I'm officially clinging to the Anti-DRM Bandwagon.
Sterkenburg 3rd April 2009, 16:22 Quote
The only reason I have any problem with DVDs, and the only reason I've ripped every DVD I've bought (other than convenience), is because of unskippable ads. Prices haven't come down any, but they keep packing more and more ads (usually for their own products at least) at the beginning... and when I put a disc in the player, it's because I want to WATCH it, not watch it in half an hour. If I ever upgrade to BD, I'll probably do it via a BD drive for my PC and a copy of SlySoft, not a player.
Kris 16th June 2009, 08:42 Quote
So true... the inq is really correct with their "trademarked" slogan "piracy: the better choice(tm)" - all DRM-s will be cracked, and those that were planning to pirate smth, will do so anyway, and those that didn't plan on it are the ones that suffer, because the 'merchandice' that they've bought is less usable than what you can download from the net.
Or imagine donoading some movie you've never heard of, wanting to see it before shelling out wads of cash for a blu-ray copy, only to realise that after you've bought it, you still can't use it how you want. Like buying a car, with which you are only allowed to use the first three gears.
gavomatic57 16th June 2009, 09:23 Quote
Not interested in like-for-like copies, just want a 1280x720 copy for my laptop or an even smaller copy for my PSP that isn't infected with DRM.
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