bit-tech.net

RealNetworks launches DVD ripper

RealNetworks launches DVD ripper

RealNetworks will be hoping its new RealDVD package will appease the industry with its DRM restrictions.

A new DVD ripping application has been released from an unexpected quarter – RealNetworks.

According to a report on Wired.com, the company – best known for its video streaming software – revealed a DVD ripping package at the DEMOfall Conference in San Deigo yesterday. The interesting part? The software is, the company claims, complete legal.

As you would imagine, a 'legal' DVD ripping package comes with a whole host of hidden extras to ensure its legitimacy – in this case, it's in the form of a DRM wrapper. Unlike free packages, the videos created by the software – called RealDVD – will only run in a special player application bundled with the ripper. So, no streaming to your Xbox or PS3 in the living room then.

To prevent sharing-style naughtiness, the digital copies are further restricted to play on a maximum of five unique computers – all of which must have a copy of the RealDVD package installed, at a cost of $30 (£15) each.

While the digital rights management included with the package is likely to placate the film industry, the company might still land in legal hot water: the DVD Copy Control Association is currently appealing a case against a video server company which claimed that the licence included with retail DVDs don't include a restriction that the disc itself is physically present during playback – opening the doors to technologies such as RealDVD. Should the courts accept the appeal and reverse the decision, it's quite likely that RealNetworks could find itself on the other side of the law – despite its best efforts to maintain some level of usefulness alongside the DRM restrictions.

Would you purchase a DVD ripping toolkit that was fully legitimate but came with restrictions, or would you prefer to keep on using free solutions and rely on the defence of 'fair use'? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

17 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Delphium 9th September 2008, 13:00 Quote
Quote:
Unlike free packages, the videos created by the software – called RealDVD – will only run in a special player application bundled with the ripper. So, no streaming to your Xbox or PS3 in the living room then.

To prevent sharing-style naughtiness, the digital copies are further restricted to play on a maximum of five unique computers – all of which must have a copy of the RealDVD package installed, at a cost of $30 (£15) each.


Riiiiight, so anyone else think this will be a complete flop then!?
I am certainly not sold by this product.

I personally can not stand any of the RealNetworks software, mostly due to poor gui and bloatyness and formats that are not comatible with anything other than RealNetworks own software.

On the bright side, I got a giggle from this feeble attempt
ChaosDefinesOrder 9th September 2008, 13:30 Quote
Buffering...
mclean007 9th September 2008, 14:01 Quote
So you can pay to legally download this software to allow you to rip your DVDs with a stack of sh***y DRM, or you can legally download DVDDecrypter for free and legally rip your DVDs with no DRM and then legally encode them with your choice of codec, again with no DRM. Tough call.

By analogy - imagine someone made a CD ripper that cost £15 and you could only rip to a copy protected format at 64 kbps, that you could then only play using that ripper on that computer or up to 4 others (each of which also had to have a £15 copy of the ripper on it). Or you could use EAC / Windows Media Player / heck even iTunes and rip to your choice of unprotected format at quality of your choice. I bet that software would fly off the shelves at PC World.
wuyanxu 9th September 2008, 14:03 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delphium

I personally can not stand any of the RealNetworks software, mostly due to poor gui and bloatyness

same, RealAlternative FTW :)

this one will be a flop, sure, it's a legal way of doing it, but just like DRM discussion, it saves so much space and so much easier if you just rip into 700MB Xvid or 1400MB m-HD x264.

i even take it as far as down converting some not so good films to iPhone format for long term storage.
DXR_13KE 9th September 2008, 14:34 Quote
FAIL!
mclean007 9th September 2008, 15:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by wuyanxu
i even take it as far as down converting some not so good films to iPhone format for long term storage.
Seriously? But HDD space is absurdly cheap nowadays - why not keep the original vob rips, or at least full res high bit-rate xvid / h264?

I archive my movies as straight rips (main movie only, no extras, no subs, no additional sound tracks etc.), then encode as required.
Firehed 9th September 2008, 15:17 Quote
I'll be sticking with Handbrake, thank you very much.

Still, I don't see how this could be legal, at least within the US. The "illegal" part about ripping a DVD is breaking the CSS encryption on it, not that possible fair use issue. Unless this software not only outputs a css-encrypted file but retains the original encryption (which I think is impossible unless you're just ripping the video_ts directory outright), it still violates that damned DMCA.
Delphium 9th September 2008, 15:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firehed
Still, I don't see how this could be legal, at least within the US. The "illegal" part about ripping a DVD is breaking the CSS encryption on it, not that possible fair use issue. Unless this software not only outputs a css-encrypted file but retains the original encryption (which I think is impossible unless you're just ripping the video_ts directory outright), it still violates that damned DMCA.

Haha yer this is true, so id be interested in how they do this... yet im sure we are unlikely to find out as no one will buy it hrhr.

Handbrake be made of much WIN.
wuyanxu 9th September 2008, 16:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mclean007
Seriously? But HDD space is absurdly cheap nowadays - why not keep the original vob rips, or at least full res high bit-rate xvid / h264?

I archive my movies as straight rips (main movie only, no extras, no subs, no additional sound tracks etc.), then encode as required.
because a single DVD doesn't quite fit 6 750MB films, so if i down-convert a not-so-good one, it'd fit them perfectly.

it's all about most effecient backup :) (and idling quad core wanting to be used)
Sleepstreamer 9th September 2008, 16:37 Quote
Completely useless IMO
koola 9th September 2008, 21:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delphium
On the bright side, I got a giggle from this feeble attempt

hehe, same here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delphium
Handbrake be made of much WIN.

Even more WIN once the BluRay build is released :D
DriftCarl 9th September 2008, 22:31 Quote
so spending time installing the software, learning how to use it, spending a logn time ripping a dvd and then burning it back to another dvd and only being able to play on machines with the package?

its just so much less effort to just download themovie.avi
NiHiLiST 10th September 2008, 07:45 Quote
Come on guys, this is RealNetworks, what did you expect?!
cyrilthefish 10th September 2008, 07:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by NiHiLiST
Come on guys, this is RealNetworks, what did you expect?!
True, i gave up any hopes of them making any software worth installing back in 1998
plagio 10th September 2008, 09:07 Quote
Quote:
As you would imagine, a 'legal' DVD ripping package comes with a whole host of hidden extras to ensure its legitimacy

That's realNetwork all right
Herbicide 10th September 2008, 12:26 Quote
Quote:
the DVD Copy Control Association
Sony, Universal, various parts of the AOL collective and probably the MPAA and their little dog too.

How many ***Associations do they need?
[USRF]Obiwan 10th September 2008, 13:02 Quote
RealNetwork


Bwuuuoooohahhahahaahaahahahaha

yeah right!
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums