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Nokia tests 173Mb/s mobile broadband

Nokia tests 173Mb/s mobile broadband

Nokia is hoping that the new tech will allow you to ditch those wires once and for all.

Nokia has announced results from a real-world test of a new fourth-generation mobile broadband technology, dubbed Long-Term Evolution or LTE. The tests saw the service reaching speeds of 173Mb/s in realistic scenarios.

The prototype base station for the LTE radio system was installed at the top of the Heinrich Hertz Institute building in Berlin, a location known to cause mobile users problems due to interference. Testing the technology with multiple simultaneous users Nokia was still able to reach 173Mb/s, and the mobile phone giant is touting that as a realistic approximation for actual user-end throughput when the service eventually goes live.

LTE was also tested for range, with equipment installed on cars travelling up to 1KM away from the base station able to use the broadband service without a problem.

The main appeal of the technology from the point of view of the networks looking to implement 4G technology is that the LTE system doesn't require new equipment beyond the base station itself. Matthais Reiss, head of the LTE Business Program at Nokia, said in a public statement that "we now have evidence that future LTE networks can run on existing base station sites and mobile operators can build LTE networks without requiring new antenna sites."

The actual figures Nokia is currently using in their marketing for the technology are 100Mb/s downstream and 50Mb/s upstream, with the trial showing that this should be expected (exceeded, even) in normal usage scenarios. These speeds compare favourably with the closest competitor, WiMAX, which runs at 70Mb/s downstream and 70Mb/s upstream in best-case scenarios.

Is this level of connection something which floats your boat or are you still struggling to think of a mobile application which could possibly make use of such bandwidth? Let us know via the forums.

18 Comments

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Delphium 31st December 2007, 13:52 Quote
Sweeeeet now to drop my BT line that is there for nothing more than the ADSL, sounds perfect for laptop use
DeX 31st December 2007, 14:38 Quote
Hang on, how is it they are able to get 173Mbit/s wirelessly when they can only get 100Mbit/s through a fibre optic cable? If mobile internet saves us the cost of a £15bn fibre infrastructure then I'm all for it. Something makes me suspect though that Nokia are not predicting this network's use by home broadband users.
samkiller42 31st December 2007, 14:46 Quote
Optics can send more than 100mb down it, well, it did when i looked at it at college.
This is definatley impressive speeds. I WANT!!

SAm
Delphium 31st December 2007, 15:02 Quote
Indeed Optics usually run at 1/10/40gbps speeds.
However 100mbit is a danm nice speed, and without the need for FTTH it looks promising.
Dev25 31st December 2007, 16:29 Quote
Come on High speed boradband in the Uk Catch up to the BB speeds of like japan etc (Doubt they will but you can always dream)
chrisb2e9 31st December 2007, 16:48 Quote
cant wait for this to come to canada in 30 years or so. the fastest i can get where i live is still a whopping 3mbit.
DeX 31st December 2007, 17:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by samkiller42
Optics can send more than 100mb down it, well, it did when i looked at it at college.
This is definatley impressive speeds. I WANT!!

SAm

Yes of course but I'm talking about home broadband. When you divide 40Gbps between millions of users then you're not left with very much. I'm saying I'd be surprised if Nokia are expecting a speed of 173Mbps when thousands of users are on a single base station or when there are millions of users on the system nationwide. I guess we'll just have to wait and see what kind of performance we get in the 'real' real world.
p3n 31st December 2007, 18:53 Quote
All well and good but the latency/security issues will keep me from ever using such a connection to the internet, also 1km is all that far, especially moving at 30 mph
MiNiMaL_FuSS 31st December 2007, 19:22 Quote
still cant get more than 2mb in a hell of alot of the country due to distance form the nearest exchange....
DXR_13KE 31st December 2007, 20:11 Quote
this is going to be very expensive....
outlawaol 1st January 2008, 00:27 Quote
Well, lets see.. I pay 15 cents to send a text msg, or to receive one.

So....
an average txt msg is about 84 bytes
I can send 12 msg's per KB
I can also send up to 12,288 msg's per MB
Or I can send 12,582,912 per GB

Lets see... if they use the same fee's as a txt msg, they will be rich! Exactly $1843.20 Per MB. One more reason nickle and dimeing everyone is such a huge thing with these cell carries. Imagine that a cell company charges you per MB for content you dont even control (Like your own MP3's, movies, ect) Then also charging you to actually buy them from them ONLY for your phone. Need I go on?
rhuitron 1st January 2008, 11:01 Quote
Well.
I am very impressed by this and will look forward to it.

But unfortunately, I live in some foothills of Northern California, And nobody (Providers) even have 3g towers up here.
It really blows.
Once I get to the metropolitan area about 20 miles away, I can get on it with my N75. But we are so freaking behind it is not even funny.
Like i say, I cant even get more than 350 kbps where I am at. ***********hold on***********

Yup, I did a speedtest.net test, and for some odd-ass reason I appear to be in Miami Florida, and get only 300kbps dwn and 100 up. :(

So I hope guys enjoy it over there, Because I dont see it coming over here anytime soon.
Hell, the last cellphone to come out from Cingular was the Nokia N75.
liratheal 1st January 2008, 11:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dev25
Come on High speed boradband in the Uk Catch up to the BB speeds of like japan etc (Doubt they will but you can always dream)

Us here in the UK are going to be waiting a long time before we catch up to the likes of Korea/Japan etc.

Korea especially have the space under ground to lay masses of fibre, we as we have trouble keeping our drains unblocked.

I doubt, short of massive spending on order from OFCOM or something similar, UK is ever going to reach the same standard as some countries.

We're good at getting stiffed over things we should be able to do/have.
Cupboard 1st January 2008, 13:22 Quote
I don't think there government is going to be investing much in fiber in the next few years, most of their spare cash is going into the Olympics (they are even cutting arts councils funding etc for that, its ridiculous)
Skill3d 1st January 2008, 21:56 Quote
will this boil my eggs faster than using a pan?
hawky84 2nd January 2008, 14:22 Quote
Well I'm currently getting 170Kbps at best through my Virgin ADSL connection which is suppose to be up to 8Mbps, I get kicked out of so many CSS games 'cause of my ping rate that I gave up playing! Doesn't look like cable of fibre is coming to my road anytime soon so I hope WiMAX or LTE come out soon, anything is better than what I have at the moment. Although I still think this is a fair few years off as I was looking at 806.11a back in 2005 at Uni and they are on 806.11e now and still not even out of small localized testing.

Nokia should win the battle if LTE can work on the current infrastructure, I mean appart from being able to get to market faster than WiMAX they wont have to deal with the parents screaming about "not another wireless mast transmitting killer rays, think of the children think of the children!!!"
tibtib123 19th June 2009, 14:44 Quote
I definitely think that in a few years <a style="text-decoration: none; font-weight: normal; color: rgb(34, 34, 34);"http://www.three.co.uk/Mobile_Broadband" target="_blank">mobile broadband</a> will take over as the main form of internet connection around the world - with Wi Max seemingly taking over Africa it cant be long before we have a decent system here?
knuck 19th June 2009, 14:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisb2e9
cant wait for this to come to canada in 30 years or so. the fastest i can get where i live is still a whopping 3mbit.

a camp in northern alberta doesn't count :D (are you even still there :) )

It's true however that our ISPs here suck
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