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Omega Desk by Daniel Fessler (Squigly)

I remember thinking that the frame came together really quickly and had high hopes that the rest of the build would go as smoothly.. but the devil was in the details.

Omega Desk by Daniel Fessler (Squigly) Omega Desk by Daniel Fessler (Squigly)
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I used 2mm aluminium plates that I had laser cut and then rolled myself at the workshop, so in total around 32kg of aluminium was used. Heavy yes but since I was planning on mounting a rather monstrous 1080 radiator to the cladding I needed the strength.

Omega Desk by Daniel Fessler (Squigly) Omega Desk by Daniel Fessler (Squigly)
Click to enlarge


It was then time to start mounting the cladding to the frame, this must have been the most time consuming and labour intensive part of the build. In total there are 240 rivnuts and bolts holding the cladding to the frame.

Omega Desk by Daniel Fessler (Squigly) Omega Desk by Daniel Fessler (Squigly)
Click to enlarge

While the cladding was going on I started noticing some "lag" in some of the panels, specifically on the legs due to the angle. Luckily having some spare aluminium plate I made up some support struts that could be mounted on the inside of the desk that gave enough tension and aligned the joints very well. Based on the fact that this build was already starting to tip the scales I wasn't too concerned about additional weight.


Omega Desk by Daniel Fessler (Squigly) Omega Desk by Daniel Fessler (Squigly)
Click to enlarge

After completing the outside cladding it was time to get the front window mounted. I had originally intended to use glass, but designing in Sketchup and real world builds often do not align 100%. I had concerns the glass may not fit so well and well..