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Cosmos Dragon by Martin Blass

Cosmos Dragon by Martin and Stefan Blass

Foreword by: Antony Leather

Seeing Cosmos Dragon come together on our forums was quite spectacular, for me anyway. Black and green always go together well in modding and luminous green goes even better. Martin and Stefan Blass (aka thechoozen and tr1gg3r) who own bt-custompc.de clearly have some impressive skills in working with acrylic and they applied their handiwork to practically every inch of Cosmos Dragon.

The result is a mod that is so extensive it completely covers the underlying Coolermaster Cosmos S case, has a custom water cooling reservoir and even a custom water block top, not to mention custom sliding front doors and a custom side panel. Plenty of custom bits then!

What's really special though is when the lights are turned down and the machine is fired up. It's like looking at something from Lego's M:Tron series, with that luminous green acrylic doing it's job brilliantly. Martin has been kind enough to take the time to tell us a bit about how Cosmos Dragon was built, so, it's over to him.

Cosmos Dragon by Martin Blass Cosmos Dragon by Martin Blass
Click to enlarge

My brother Stefan and I run a modding shop called BT-CustomPC.de, in Cologne, Germany. We’ve both been very active case modders for more than 10 years. We started this particular project back in 2008 after having visited a games convention where we picked up a Coolermaster Cosmos S case. We’d planned to mod a Cosmos S for as long as we’d known that this case had been available.

When we first started thinking about the project, we had a massive brainstorming session where we decided what we were going to do with the case. In the end We went with a green and black colour scheme, but we thought we’d go with the flow as far as aesthetics were concerned – we made no sketches of how the case would look like when it was finished. There were no limitations.

Cosmos Dragon by Martin Blass Cosmos Dragon by Martin Blass
Click to enlarge

On thing we did know, was that it would be water-cooled though, so the first item we built was a reservoir which would be placed on top of the case. To make it we cut out around 40 single pieces of Plexiglas and glued them together. We also replaced the large mesh section on the side panel of the case (including the big fan) with a piece of Plexiglas that we cut to shape.