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Features

Features

Both joysticks have throttle control, and despite its size, the FLY 5 comes out on top here thanks to its dual throttle capability. These can lock from the side if you're just dealing with one engine, but are a real boon if you're partial to piloting twin-engine aircraft (especially if one engine happens to catch fire).

Cyborg FLY 5 vs Thrustmaster T-Flight Hotas X  Features Cyborg FLY 5 vs Thrustmaster T-Flight Hotas X  Features
Click to enlarge - the Cyborg FLY 5

At the rear of the T-Flight Hotas X's throttle section is yet another axis lever that's useful for controlling ground brakes or even the rudder if you loathe the twist-action. The T-Flight Hotas X has the advantage here as you can actually lock the twist action completely via a screw on the stick. With the FLY 5, you're stuck with it unfortunately.

Cyborg FLY 5 vs Thrustmaster T-Flight Hotas X  Features Cyborg FLY 5 vs Thrustmaster T-Flight Hotas X  Features
Click to enlarge - the Thrustmaster T-Flight Hotas X
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The T-Flight Hotas X is can be partially dismantled - just as well as it's a big lump to try and hide away in a cupboard. The throttle section detaches from the rest of the joystick, but isn't completely separable. The FLY 5 has more than a few tricks up its sleeve here.

Cyborg FLY 5 vs Thrustmaster T-Flight Hotas X  Features Cyborg FLY 5 vs Thrustmaster T-Flight Hotas X  Features
Click to enlarge - the Cyborg FLY 5

Firstly, it actually comes dismantled in a tiny box about a quarter of the size of that the T-Flight Hotas X comes in. The stick itself is detachable and the base swings open into a tri-pronged support. It's perfect for storing away in a tight space or taking to your mate's house or LAN party. Despite such a critical component lacking the rigidity of a single moulded piece, the stick is wobble-free, thanks to a hefty locking ring securing the two together.