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Tuniq Tower 120

Manufacturer: Tuniq
Price (as reviewed): £33.78 (inc. VAT)

CPU Socket Support: AMD 940 / 939 / 754 / AM2, Intel LGA775
Weight: 798g ( without fan )
Size: 131mm (W) x 108mm (H) x 153mm (D)

Tuniq (with a Q), is a company under the umbrella of Sunbeamtech. In comparison, Sunbeam is a more varied supplier of PC accessories, with the odd case and PSU too, however Tuniq only specialises in coolers, cases and is now making 1kW+ PSUs as well.

We've had requests to review the Tuniq Tower 120, with many who've already bought one giving positive feedback. But how well does it stack against the other heatsinks we've previously looked at? Read on to find out.


Tuniq Tower 120 Tuniq Tower 120

The box looks good, is easy to get into and the Tower 120 comes very securely packed in thick foam where everything has its own place. The only problem is getting everything back in in the correct place (on the off chance you need to), because there are so many little cuts for everything. But as a customer I'd rather it get to me in one place in the first place to be honest, and in that respect, Tuniq has done excellently.

Tuniq Tower 120 Tuniq Tower 120

In the box you get a slightly daunting array of mounting equipment, even back to several year old socket 478 by including a specific CPU brace plate. I suppose the heat old 90nm P4 CPUs chucked out was quite considerable and there's still a market for those wishing to quieten an old PC, but is it worth the extra cost to those who are never going to need it, considering it's not part of a universal plate?

Other than that, the chromed metal hold down (for the other side) is universal and also included for AM2(+) processors is a much simpler Zalman-esq retention clip. The manual however is, well, simply pathetic. The text is simple and suffices, but the pictures are extremely poor - the quality speaks of 'camera phone on high compression'.

Tuniq Tower 120 Tuniq Tower 120

Tuniq clearly couldn't be bothered to make a new fold out sheet to include the additional AM2 hold down either - that's just an extra piece of tissue paper thrown in. As most of you are the kind of hardcore techies that consider reading the manual a sign of masculine weakness, it's probably never going to be used anyway. However, having something to fall back on without resorting to a few hours Googling (although we show you anyway on page three, and you can always ask in the forums) is always a necessity.