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SilverStone Raven RV02 Case Review

Internals

The PSU is installed vertically at the back of the case, where it’s provided with a panel of vent holes for a fan intake. As with the other intakes, this vented section has an easily removed dust filter – you don’t even need to open the case to remove and clean it.

The vents and dust filter allow your power supply to take in clean air, which is exhausted through the top without hindering the thermals in the chassis. The motherboard’s unusual orientation, and the fact that the PSU is mounted vertically at the back, make building a PC in the RV02 unlike cabling any other case.

Fortunately, SilverStone has added a good number of cable management cut-outs, nooks and crannies to facilitate the process. The cavity behind the motherboard is ample too, with plenty of room for excess wires.

SilverStone Raven RV02 Case Review PSU mount, dust filters and building a PC SilverStone Raven RV02 Case Review PSU mount, dust filters and building a PC
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The RV02 has been pieced together by fitting matte black plastic over a steel frame, all of which is finished in matte black. The steel isn’t the thickest we’ve seen – the structure twists and bends a little under stress, so if you’re after a case to mod into your own crime-busting Batmobile, this isn’t the one.

SilverStone Raven RV02 Case Review PSU mount, dust filters and building a PC SilverStone Raven RV02 Case Review PSU mount, dust filters and building a PC
Click to enlarge

The side panel window of our RV02 (look for the RV02B-W model) is much bigger than that of the RV01, affording a better view of the interior. The Perspex sheet is screwed over the side panel, rather than being stuck under it, which is a quality touch. While the RV02 is longer than most cases at 650mm, the sleek edges go a long way to covering this up.

To avoid the problem of cables sticking out of the top of the case, SilverStone has recessed the expansion brackets and PSU, and made a removable roof panel that fits over the lot. There’s plenty of room for your bulky kettle lead and DVI connectors, while the roof panel hides the cables and routes them out through the rear. The panel is largely wire mesh, allowing air to escape through the top.