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Gigabyte Sumo 4112 Case Review

Gigabtye Sumo 4112

Manufacturer: Gigabyte
UK Price (as reviewed): £100 MSRP
US Price (as reviewed): $169.00 (ex. Tax)

While Gigabyte might not be the first name that springs to mind when thinking of PC chassis manufacturers, the Taiwanese company actually has a remarkably good reputation for solid and dependable cases, with previous offerings like the iSolo and 3D Aurora lines.

The latest offering, the Sumo 4112, is very much in the same mould as these predecessors and looks to offer solid build quality and layout with at least one nifty unique feature to its name.

The exterior panelling of the case is black painted steel, with the internal chassis shipped in unfinished grey. This makes the Sumo, like it’s name sake, extremely solid and heavy, with the panelling benefiting from folded edges to strengthen them. While this means it’ll be a bugger to haul off to a LAN party, steel cases are able to weather the abuse of use well. In the case of the Sumo, external build quality is excellent, with the panels fitting snugly and securely.

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Not all of the case’s exterior is steel though, with the Sumo’s front fascia made up of two very thick anodised aluminium plates. These plates create a gorgeously curved and smooth fascia, that makes a welcome change from the vent-festooned cases we so often see.

While the lower aluminium panel is fixed in place and plays host to the red LED-lit ventilation opening for the case’s single front 120mm fan, the upper panel acts as a door to the Sumo’s drive bays. Opening the door reveals a fantastic inclusion in the form of a 2.5in hard disk caddy and mount pre-installed into the top 5.25in drive bay.

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Above the front door, mounted into the roof of the case, is the front panel; unfortunately it’s not so well thought out as the case’s door and removable 2.5in drive bay. The sunken power button easily gets stuck when pressed, and all the ports are flush with the steel roof panel rather than being recessed or angled for easier access. Still, this does all mean that the case retains a clean look.

Looking to the left side panel we find a design very similar to that of the Gigabyte 3D Aurora, with a large meshed area allowing airflow into the case, with a chunky lockable side panel catch. In a nice touch, Gigabyte also includes a Perspex panel with the case, allowing you to swap out the black mesh for a case window if you want to show off all that shiny hardware inside. The window opening isn’t ideally cut though, and as well as your hardware, you’ll also be getting a nice view of the case’s plain-grey metal drive bays.

Rounding off the Sumo’s exterior are four very sturdy, swing-out case feet, ensuring the that the heavy weight Sumo won’t be prone to toppling over.