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Archive for Tim Smalley

And It's Goodbye From Me

Posted on 8th Apr 2010 at 11:57 by Tim Smalley with 50 comments

Tim Smalley
You've probably read that Richard has packed his bags to head off to Taiwan. Well, he's not the only one who is moving on, as it's also time for me to announce that I am moving onto my next challenge.

While Richard's move won't really change anything (he'll carry on writing for the site), my own move has changed things at bit-tech - I've not been around an awful lot for a while, so you're probably not going to notice anything different now because the change happened a few months back.

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One, Two, Seven - get ready for the recovery

Posted on 21st Sep 2009 at 15:32 by Tim Smalley with 7 comments

Tim Smalley
Over the past six months or so, it has become increasingly difficult to get excited about the computer hardware industry. Regular bit-tech readers have probably noticed my own output has dropped a little.

I've been focusing on the bigger picture (which included a lot of strategic work and a bit-tech site design refresh), and also turned some of my attention to new projects within Dennis that I'll be working on while I continue my role as Editor of bit-tech.

The lack of excitement is, in many respects, down to the recession - companies have been pulling down the hatches and boarding up windows while they weather the storm. There's been nothing exciting to talk about and it has been difficult to get hugely enthusiastic about the industry's future when nobody has announced a major technology breakthrough.

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When is a browser bigger than the platform it runs on?

Posted on 15th Jun 2009 at 11:52 by Tim Smalley with 16 comments

Tim Smalley
Whether or not Microsoft's decision to ship Windows 7 without a browser goes ahead, there are still other ways that it could, in theory, attempt to control the browser market with potentially underhand tactics. That, if anything, is what the EU should be looking at in its latest antitrust case against the software giant.

For instance, I've heard suggestions that Microsoft could tie OEM's Windows marketing money to Internet Explorer bundling in Europe - that's wrong if it happens and Microsoft should be punished if found guilty of such business practices.

Computing is moving into the cloud - we're moving to a model where your data will be available on any device with an Internet connection and a web browser. If you look at things in that way, the operating system is becoming less important and the browser is now more important than ever. With that in mind, it's easy to see why Opera is fighting so hard to have the EU intervene regarding Internet Explorer.

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Thank you EU Regulators, you have broken Windows 7

Posted on 12th Jun 2009 at 13:49 by Tim Smalley with 102 comments

Tim Smalley
It looks like the European Commission and Opera have got their way and Windows 7 will now ship without a browser installed in Europe.

It's fair to say that Windows 7 is now broken - Microsoft has said that its decision to ship Windows 7 without a browser installed means that it's no longer possible to upgrade from a previous version of Windows while keeping all of your settings, including your browser of choice. Instead, the European version (even the upgrade version) will require a clean install.

It's like a bad joke. It just isn't funny and is actually offensive. That the Commission think this is a good idea shows how far out of touch it is with reality in this instance.

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AMD could move all ATI GPUs to SOI at 32nm - here's why

Posted on 9th Jun 2009 at 10:58 by Tim Smalley with 7 comments

Tim Smalley
One of the most interesting discussions we had last week was with silicon manufacturing firm Global Foundries, and it talked about its future following its separation from AMD.

Naturally, we talked about process technology and where the industry is heading, and bit-tech came away with a good idea of how Global Foundries hopes to succeed where AMD couldn’t, becoming a leader in silicon manufacturing technology.

Ever since AMD acquired ATI, the new combined company has talked at length about its plans to integrate the GPU onto the CPU die. This decision has been greeted with polarised reactions; Nvidia argues that the integrated GPUs will be ‘outdated’ while AMD and Intel, which later announced its intention to do the same, say it’s the natural progression of technology as CPUs becomes more parallel and GPUs become more general purpose.

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Will Windows 7 really cost more than Vista?

Posted on 20th May 2009 at 11:52 by Tim Smalley with 30 comments

Tim Smalley
While Darren Ward, Director of Product Management for Dell’s Business Client Product Group, has said that Microsoft is likely to charge more for Windows 7 licences than it did for both Windows Vista and Windows XP, I’m not 100 per cent convinced that it'll affect consumers in quite the same way it does OEMs.

I would be quite surprised if the price increase is as widespread as implied by Ward’s statements – many commentators seem to think he means that every version of Windows 7 will be more expensive, but I think it’s likely to affect a smaller subset of potential Windows 7 adopters.

It’s important to understand the context in which the news was reported because I think that it makes quite a difference to what Ward actually said.

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Guess who's back in the project log forum?

Posted on 2nd May 2009 at 09:54 by Tim Smalley with 3 comments

Tim Smalley
G69T, the Italian stallion behind Dark Blade, one of my favourite projects of all time, is back with another worklog on the bit-tech forums after a two year break from modding.

In his latest project, titled DBRS Project, G69T plans to make a driving station with an integrated PC chassis. G69T describes it as "a very simple project," but we'll have to wait and see what his definition of simple is.

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Overclocking the ATI Radeon HD 4770

Posted on 29th Apr 2009 at 15:40 by Tim Smalley with 12 comments

Tim Smalley
One thing we unfortunately had to cut out of our AMD ATI Radeon HD 4770 review yesterday was overclocking. Understandably, a number of our readers asked why we'd not bothered to overclock the card.

The answer is that we simply ran out of time when we made the decision to double (and triple) check all of our Far Cry 2 performance numbers when the new Radeon came out on top against the cards we'd compared it to. Although the results were theoretically possible - compared to the much-loved Radeon HD 4850, it has a higher pixel fillrate and very similar theoretical shader throughput (it's just four percent lower), we wanted to be not just doubly sure, but triply sure before publishing our conclusions.

Yesterday afternoon, I dragged myself back down into the benchmarking sweatshop that is the bit-tech and Custom PC labs to find out how well our reference card overclocked. It's worth noting that it's not the only Radeon HD 4770 we've got in house - there are a couple of partner cards already and we'll be looking at them in due course - but we've only focused on overclocking the reference card for now.

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A brief site and forum update

Posted on 23rd Apr 2009 at 13:58 by Tim Smalley with 9 comments

Tim Smalley
I'm sure many of you have noticed that there are now a couple of new forum sections in the forums for Custom PC, our sister magazine.

The editorial teams on bit-tech and Custom PC have been working close together for a few months now and we have been working hard to not only continue making bit-tech the leading destination online, but to also create the best print magazine for hardware and technology enthusiasts, modders and gamers with Custom PC.

Custom PC also has a website associated to the magazine, but it makes little sense to dilute the team's efforts by offering two very similar propositions online. Not only is bit-tech's reach much wider than custompc.co.uk, but the technology powering the site is far superior as well. As a result, Dennis is in the process of closing the Custom PC website down and moving relevant parts of the site across to bit-tech.

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Download the first batch of bit-tech & Custom PC wallpapers

Posted on 9th Apr 2009 at 13:08 by Tim Smalley with 33 comments

Tim Smalley
One of the great things about being in the Dennis headquarters is that bit-tech now has access to the photo studio and photography team, who do all of the magazine cover shoots using some quite interesting lighting tricks.

Over the coming months, the plan is to spend some of the studio time allocated to the Custom PC magazine cover shoots on creating some more artistic shots that we would've been unable to do on our own... mainly due to lack of skill and know-how, but we're learning how some of the shots were created and hope to reveal some more details for those of you who frequent our photography forum.

In light of this, we have created the first set of wallpapers based on some of the photos that have been used on the Custom PC cover in the last few months, as well as the new photo we created for our monthly hardware buyer's guide.

Click on to download the wallpapers!

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Bit-tech Modding Update - July 2014 in association with Corsair

Bit-tech Modding Update - July 2014 in association with Corsair

We take a look at a few of the best projects to be completed this month
Mod of the Month June 2014 in association with Corsair

Mod of the Month June 2014 in association with Corsair

We've got six of the best mods and scratchbuilds for you to drool over

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